Looking after learners

2019-05-21 06:01
AnchorSA conducts group and individual sessions, depending on the needs of the learner.

AnchorSA conducts group and individual sessions, depending on the needs of the learner.

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AnchorSA non-profit organisation (NPO) donated 50 care packs to girls at Belthorn Primary School in Crawford on Thursday 2 May.

The care packs with sanitary towels, washcloths, wet wipes and hand sanitisers also included pencil bags.

This Strandfontein based organisation has been in partnership with the school for almost two years. It focuses on improving the well being of the learners.

Director of the organisation Nadia Jacobs says the aim is to equip the girls from Grade 6 and Grade 7 with dignity and restorative abilities. She says this will give them confidence to feel beautiful no matter the circumstances. She says it must be noted that going to school is not just about the academics.“It is not only education that is important, but emotional wisdom is equally important,” Jacobs says.

She realised this over the 20 years that she worked as a counsellor. An opportunity to come up with a solution for the problem was presented to her by a founding member, Fazlin Wyngaard, learning support educator.

Through a team of volunteers, she works with, they investigate and once the cause of the problem has been identified for each child, they address it with the school and a parent; after which necessary interventions are pursued.

Jacobs says depending on each scenario, interventions could involve anyone from the principal, parents, social organisations such as the Child Welfare Society, to the department of social development and police.

The organisation works with various schools, with each school getting two volunteers at a time and Jacobs says the feedback has been positive.

“The success rate, with regards to this intervention strategy, has been amazing, parents feel comfortable with the knowledge that their child is safer, principals are happy that actual healing is taking place. The best part of this process is that the learner now has a safe space,” says Jacobs.

She says this coming month end the care pack programme will be at Douglas Road Primary in Wynberg.

Although she is happy with the progress of their programmes at school, Jacobs is worried about a lack of funding and help. She says they do not have a stipend for their volunteers and most of them are unemployed and they have battled to get help with drawing up a plan to be submitted to potential sponsors and appeal to anyone who can help. They also accept donations to support their cause.

They also hosted an adolescent suicide workshop at Medway Church Hall in Plumstead with Skillful Hands NPO. The workshop focused on the myths, risks and truths surrounding suicide. “Suicide and cutting have become a very real factor within our schools, but is still not recognised as a real problem,” Jacob says.

School principal Elzaar Wyngaard says the NPO helps make the school a comfortable space for the learners by providing and caring for the vulnerable children.

Wyngaard makes an example that Jacobs conducts a mother and daughter session, something that should be happening at homes. “Realistically, we know not all homes do that, and Jacobs closes that gap.”

She says the programme is in line with the life skill lessons offered at school and does not only focus on providing the packs but teaches them about their bodies as well.

V For more information about donations and programmes email anchorsa.org@gmail.com.

AnchorSA non-profit organisation (NPO) donated 50 care packs to girls at Belthorn Primary School in Crawford on Thursday 2 May.

The care packs with sanitary towels, washcloths, wet wipes and hand sanitisers also included pencil bags.

This Strandfontein based organisation has been in partnership with the school for almost two years. It focuses on improving the well being of the learners.

Director of the organisation Nadia Jacobs says the aim is to equip the girls from Grade 6 and Grade 7 with dignity and restorative abilities. She says this will give them confidence to feel beautiful no matter the circumstances. She says it must be noted that going to school is not just about the academics.“It is not only education that is important, but emotional wisdom is equally important,” Jacobs says.

She realised this over the 20 years that she worked as a counsellor. An opportunity to come up with a solution for the problem was presented to her by a founding member, Fazlin Wyngaard, learning support educator.

Through a team of volunteers, she works with, they investigate and once the cause of the problem has been identified for each child, they address it with the school and a parent; after which necessary interventions are pursued.

Jacobs says depending on each scenario, interventions could involve anyone from the principal, parents, social organisations such as the Child Welfare Society, to the department of social development and police.

The organisation works with various schools, with each school getting two volunteers at a time and Jacobs says the feedback has been positive.

“The success rate, with regards to this intervention strategy, has been amazing, parents feel comfortable with the knowledge that their child is safer, principals are happy that actual healing is taking place. The best part of this process is that the learner now has a safe space,” says Jacobs.

She says this coming month end the care pack programme will be at Douglas Road Primary in Wynberg.

Although she is happy with the progress of their programmes at school, Jacobs is worried about a lack of funding and help. She says they do not have a stipend for their volunteers and most of them are unemployed and they have battled to get help with drawing up a plan to be submitted to potential sponsors and appeal to anyone who can help. They also accept donations to support their cause. They also hosted an adolescent suicide workshop at Medway Church Hall in Plumstead with Skillful Hands NPO. The workshop focused on the myths, risks and truths surrounding suicide. “Suicide and cutting have become a very real factor within our schools, but is still not recognised as a real problem,” Jacob says.

School principal Elzaar Wyngaard says the NPO helps make the school a comfortable space for the learners by providing and caring for the vulnerable children.

Wyngaard makes an example that Jacobs conducts a mother and daughter session, something that should be happening at homes. “Realistically, we know not all homes do that, and Jacobs closes that gap.”

She says the programme is in line with the life skill lessons offered at school and does not only focus on providing the packs but teaches them about their bodies as well.

V For more information about donations and programmes email anchorsa.org@gmail.com.

AnchorSA non-profit organisation (NPO) donated 50 care packs to girls at Belthorn Primary School in Crawford on Thursday 2 May.

The care packs with sanitary towels, washcloths, wet wipes and hand sanitisers also included pencil bags.

This Strandfontein based organisation has been in partnership with the school for almost two years. It focuses on improving the well being of the learners.

Director of the organisation Nadia Jacobs says the aim is to equip the girls from Grade 6 and Grade 7 with dignity and restorative abilities. She says this will give them confidence to feel beautiful no matter the circumstances. She says it must be noted that going to school is not just about the academics.“It is not only education that is important, but emotional wisdom is equally important,” Jacobs says.

She realised this over the 20 years that she worked as a counsellor. An opportunity to come up with a solution for the problem was presented to her by a founding member, Fazlin Wyngaard, learning support educator.

Through a team of volunteers, she works with, they investigate and once the cause of the problem has been identified for each child, they address it with the school and a parent; after which necessary interventions are pursued.

Jacobs says depending on each scenario, interventions could involve anyone from the principal, parents, social organisations such as the Child Welfare Society, to the department of social development and police.

The organisation works with various schools, with each school getting two volunteers at a time and Jacobs says the feedback has been positive.

“The success rate, with regards to this intervention strategy, has been amazing, parents feel comfortable with the knowledge that their child is safer, principals are happy that actual healing is taking place. The best part of this process is that the learner now has a safe space,” says Jacobs.

She says this coming month end the care pack programme will be at Douglas Road Primary in Wynberg.

Although she is happy with the progress of their programmes at school, Jacobs is worried about a lack of funding and help. She says they do not have a stipend for their volunteers and most of them are unemployed and they have battled to get help with drawing up a plan to be submitted to potential sponsors and appeal to anyone who can help. They also accept donations to support their cause. They also hosted an adolescent suicide workshop at Medway Church Hall in Plumstead with Skillful Hands NPO. The workshop focused on the myths, risks and truths surrounding suicide. “Suicide and cutting have become a very real factor within our schools, but is still not recognised as a real problem,” Jacob says.

School principal Elzaar Wyngaard says the NPO helps make the school a comfortable space for the learners by providing and caring for the vulnerable children.

Wyngaard makes an example that Jacobs conducts a mother and daughter session, something that should be happening at homes. “Realistically, we know not all homes do that, and Jacobs closes that gap.”

She says the programme is in line with the life skill lessons offered at school and does not only focus on providing the packs but teaches them about their bodies as well.

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