More cops on streets

2019-02-19 06:01
MEC for community safety, Alan Winde, certifies documents.

MEC for community safety, Alan Winde, certifies documents.

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths. It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future. A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community. “I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

In a bid to get police officers actively involved in fighting crime on the streets rather than spending time at the stations, provincial minister of community safety Alan Winde launched a week-long pilot project that saw provincial government employees volunteer as commissioners of oaths.

It is hoped that through the initiative, which came as a result of Winde’s push to get more police on active patrolling duty, police officers can focus on averting crime.

“In the Western Cape, we are 4500 police officers short. I have written to national police minister Bheki Cele numerous times to ask for more police. To date, he has ignored my requests, and the plight of our communities,” he said. “As a province, we do not have a mandate over the police, but we want to do something to help our residents who are living in fear. Our solution is to relieve police officers from their desks so that they can get back onto our streets. If our Western Cape Government staff can do the police’s desk work for them, they can go out and focus on catching criminals.”

Last week Tuesday 12 February, Winde certified documents from a Western Cape Government safety kiosk, situated outside the Cape Town Police Station.

He was assisted by graduate interns from the Chrysalis Academy, who are on a year-long paid work placement programme in the Department of Community Safety.

“Another important benefit of this initiative is that it saves residents from standing in long queues. I hate it when people are forced to take time away from work, sometimes unpaid leave, to stand in long queues. We need to be able to help our residents to get their documents certified quickly, so that they can get back to work, and their incomes aren’t affected,” said Winde.

A large number of documents for college and job applications were certified. It is believed that around 200 people can be assisted per hour. If the project is successful, it will be rolled out across the province in the near future.

A snap survey among employees in the Western Cape Department of Community Safety showed that many staff members were willing to do voluntary shifts outside of working hours, at their local police station, to help their community.

“I am extremely proud of our employees for living up to our value of being a caring organisation,” he said.

NEXT ON NEWS24X

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.

Inside News24

 
/News
Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.