New date for Slave

2019-02-26 06:00
Runners make their way through the historical Bo-Kaap.

Runners make their way through the historical Bo-Kaap.

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Calling all runners, walkers, fitness enthusiasts and curious history buffs – one of South Africa’s favourite road races, the Slave Route Challenge, will be taking place on Sunday 31 March.

The Slave Route Challenge was voted road race of the year for 2018 by Western Province Athletics.

Starting in 2011 with just over 2000 runners, last year’s event attracted more than 9000 participants with host club, Brimstone Itheko Sport Athletic Club, expecting to top that in 2019 as March is a traditionally busy period for the Mother City. Runners and walkers come from all over the country and even from as far away as Reunion Island, as the unique route winds past some of Cape Town’s most prominent heritage sites and provides an opportunity to gain a different perspective on Cape Town’s rich and diverse cultural history.

From City Hall in Darling Street, the route embraces District 6, Gardens, the Company’s Garden, Wale Street, Bo-Kaap, Sea Point (Cape Town Stadium), Green Point (Fort Wynyard), the CBD, up Adderley Street into Spin Street (Slave Plaque) and then through the Castle of Good Hope to finish on the Grand Parade. One of the favourite points has to be “Koeksister Hill” in the historic Bo-Kaap, so called because as runners reach the peak of the hill, they are greeted by a bevy of residents sugaring these delectable Cape Malay confections before handing them out to delighted participants.

The Slave Route Challenge comprises four separate events. Runners can do as many as they can fit in – a half marathon and a 10km run (both timed and sanctioned by Western Province Athletics), a 10km walk and a 5km fun run. The race beneficiary this year is the Mary Harding School, which provides vital educational assistance to young people who have mild to moderate mental impairment.

Farouk Meyer, event organiser from Itheko Sports Management, who himself is a sub-three-hour marathoner with 10 Two Oceans ultra marathons under his belt, is excited about the new timing of the event, saying: “Hosting the challenge in March potentially opens the event up to a greater audience, including the hordes of international visitors who will be in the Mother City over the period. Because the challenge is as much about getting fit as it is about knowledge sharing, each participant will receive a free voucher to visit the Castle of Good Hope during the month of April as well as entry to the District 6 Museum. On top of this, everyone finishing the challenge will earn a unique medal – part of a series of collectibles.”

While Cape Town hosts a multitude of sporting events, each with their own merit, the Slave Route Challenge is possibly one that has the most meaning. At a time when South Africa faces many challenges, there is no better time to come together to have fun, celebrate our differences and remember our past, while exploring new avenues and embarking on the adventure of the future on the road that lies ahead.

Enter online at Webtickets or at a Sportsman’s Warehouse near you. The closing date is Sunday 17 March.

For more information go to www.slaveroute.co.za or call 082 066 3353.

Calling all runners, walkers, fitness enthusiasts and curious history buffs – one of South Africa’s favourite road races, the Slave Route Challenge, will be taking place on Sunday 31 March.

The Slave Route Challenge was voted road race of the year for 2018 by Western Province Athletics.

Starting in 2011 with just over 2000 runners, last year’s event attracted more than 9000 participants with host club, Brimstone Itheko Sport Athletic Club, expecting to top that in 2019 as March is a traditionally busy period for the Mother City. Runners and walkers come from all over the country and even from as far away as Reunion Island, as the unique route winds past some of Cape Town’s most prominent heritage sites and provides an opportunity to gain a different perspective on Cape Town’s rich and diverse cultural history.

From City Hall in Darling Street, the route embraces District 6, Gardens, the Company’s Garden, Wale Street, Bo-Kaap, Sea Point (Cape Town Stadium), Green Point (Fort Wynyard), the CBD, up Adderley Street into Spin Street (Slave Plaque) and then through the Castle of Good Hope to finish on the Grand Parade. One of the favourite points has to be “Koeksister Hill” in the historic Bo-Kaap, so called because as runners reach the peak of the hill, they are greeted by a bevy of residents sugaring these delectable Cape Malay confections before handing them out to delighted participants.

The Slave Route Challenge comprises four separate events. Runners can do as many as they can fit in – a half marathon and a 10km run (both timed and sanctioned by Western Province Athletics), a 10km walk and a 5km fun run. The race beneficiary this year is the Mary Harding School, which provides vital educational assistance to young people who have mild to moderate mental impairment.

Farouk Meyer, event organiser from Itheko Sports Management, who himself is a sub-three-hour marathoner with 10 Two Oceans ultra marathons under his belt, is excited about the new timing of the event, saying: “Hosting the challenge in March potentially opens the event up to a greater audience, including the hordes of international visitors who will be in the Mother City over the period. Because the challenge is as much about getting fit as it is about knowledge sharing, each participant will receive a free voucher to visit the Castle of Good Hope during the month of April as well as entry to the District 6 Museum. On top of this, everyone finishing the challenge will earn a unique medal – part of a series of collectibles.”

While Cape Town hosts a multitude of sporting events, each with their own merit, the Slave Route Challenge is possibly one that has the most meaning. At a time when South Africa faces many challenges, there is no better time to come together to have fun, celebrate our differences and remember our past, while exploring new avenues and embarking on the adventure of the future on the road that lies ahead.

Enter online at Webtickets or at a Sportsman’s Warehouse near you. The closing date is Sunday 17 March.

For more information go to www.slaveroute.co.za or call 082 066 3353.

Calling all runners, walkers, fitness enthusiasts and curious history buffs – one of South Africa’s favourite road races, the Slave Route Challenge, will be taking place on Sunday 31 March.

The Slave Route Challenge was voted road race of the year for 2018 by Western Province Athletics.

Starting in 2011 with just over 2000 runners, last year’s event attracted more than 9000 participants with host club, Brimstone Itheko Sport Athletic Club, expecting to top that in 2019 as March is a traditionally busy period for the Mother City. Runners and walkers come from all over the country and even from as far away as Reunion Island, as the unique route winds past some of Cape Town’s most prominent heritage sites and provides an opportunity to gain a different perspective on Cape Town’s rich and diverse cultural history.

From City Hall in Darling Street, the route embraces District 6, Gardens, the Company’s Garden, Wale Street, Bo-Kaap, Sea Point (Cape Town Stadium), Green Point (Fort Wynyard), the CBD, up Adderley Street into Spin Street (Slave Plaque) and then through the Castle of Good Hope to finish on the Grand Parade. One of the favourite points has to be “Koeksister Hill” in the historic Bo-Kaap, so called because as runners reach the peak of the hill, they are greeted by a bevy of residents sugaring these delectable Cape Malay confections before handing them out to delighted participants.

The Slave Route Challenge comprises four separate events. Runners can do as many as they can fit in – a half marathon and a 10km run (both timed and sanctioned by Western Province Athletics), a 10km walk and a 5km fun run. The race beneficiary this year is the Mary Harding School, which provides vital educational assistance to young people who have mild to moderate mental impairment.

Farouk Meyer, event organiser from Itheko Sports Management, who himself is a sub-three-hour marathoner with 10 Two Oceans ultra marathons under his belt, is excited about the new timing of the event, saying: “Hosting the challenge in March potentially opens the event up to a greater audience, including the hordes of international visitors who will be in the Mother City over the period. Because the challenge is as much about getting fit as it is about knowledge sharing, each participant will receive a free voucher to visit the Castle of Good Hope during the month of April as well as entry to the District 6 Museum. On top of this, everyone finishing the challenge will earn a unique medal – part of a series of collectibles.”

While Cape Town hosts a multitude of sporting events, each with their own merit, the Slave Route Challenge is possibly one that has the most meaning. At a time when South Africa faces many challenges, there is no better time to come together to have fun, celebrate our differences and remember our past, while exploring new avenues and embarking on the adventure of the future on the road that lies ahead.

Enter online at Webtickets or at a Sportsman’s Warehouse near you. The closing date is Sunday 17 March. V For more information visit www.slaveroute.co.za or call 082 066 3353

Calling all runners, walkers, fitness enthusiasts and curious history buffs – one of South Africa’s favourite road races, the Slave Route Challenge, will be taking place on Sunday 31 March.

The Slave Route Challenge was voted road race of the year for 2018 by Western Province Athletics.

Starting in 2011 with just over 2000 runners, last year’s event attracted more than 9000 participants with host club, Brimstone Itheko Sport Athletic Club, expecting to top that in 2019 as March is a traditionally busy period for the Mother City. Runners and walkers come from all over the country and even from as far away as Reunion Island, as the unique route winds past some of Cape Town’s most prominent heritage sites and provides an opportunity to gain a different perspective on Cape Town’s rich and diverse cultural history.

From City Hall in Darling Street, the route embraces District 6, Gardens, the Company’s Garden, Wale Street, Bo-Kaap, Sea Point (Cape Town Stadium), Green Point (Fort Wynyard), the CBD, up Adderley Street into Spin Street (Slave Plaque) and then through the Castle of Good Hope to finish on the Grand Parade. One of the favourite points has to be “Koeksister Hill” in the historic Bo-Kaap, so called because as runners reach the peak of the hill, they are greeted by a bevy of residents sugaring these delectable Cape Malay confections before handing them out to delighted participants.

The Slave Route Challenge comprises four separate events. Runners can do as many as they can fit in – a half marathon and a 10km run (both timed and sanctioned by Western Province Athletics), a 10km walk and a 5km fun run. The race beneficiary this year is the Mary Harding School, which provides vital educational assistance to young people who have mild to moderate mental impairment.

Farouk Meyer, event organiser from Itheko Sports Management, who himself is a sub-three-hour marathoner with 10 Two Oceans ultra marathons under his belt, is excited about the new timing of the event, saying: “Hosting the challenge in March potentially opens the event up to a greater audience, including the hordes of international visitors who will be in the Mother City over the period. Because the challenge is as much about getting fit as it is about knowledge sharing, each participant will receive a free voucher to visit the Castle of Good Hope during the month of April as well as entry to the District 6 Museum. On top of this, everyone finishing the challenge will earn a unique medal – part of a series of collectibles.”

While Cape Town hosts a multitude of sporting events, each with their own merit, the Slave Route Challenge is possibly one that has the most meaning. At a time when South Africa faces many challenges, there is no better time to come together to have fun, celebrate our differences and remember our past, while exploring new avenues and embarking on the adventure of the future on the road that lies ahead.

Enter online at Webtickets or at a Sportsman’s Warehouse near you. The closing date is Sunday 17 March.

For more information go to www.slaveroute.co.za or call 082 066 3353.

Calling all runners, walkers, fitness enthusiasts and curious history buffs – one of South Africa’s favourite road races, the Slave Route Challenge, will be taking place on Sunday 31 March.

The Slave Route Challenge was voted road race of the year for 2018 by Western Province Athletics.

Starting in 2011 with just over 2000 runners, last year’s event attracted more than 9000 participants with host club, Brimstone Itheko Sport Athletic Club, expecting to top that in 2019 as March is a traditionally busy period for the Mother City. Runners and walkers come from all over the country and even from as far away as Reunion Island, as the unique route winds past some of Cape Town’s most prominent heritage sites and provides an opportunity to gain a different perspective on Cape Town’s rich and diverse cultural history.

From City Hall in Darling Street, the route embraces District 6, Gardens, the Company’s Garden, Wale Street, Bo-Kaap, Sea Point (Cape Town Stadium), Green Point (Fort Wynyard), the CBD, up Adderley Street into Spin Street (Slave Plaque) and then through the Castle of Good Hope to finish on the Grand Parade. One of the favourite points has to be “Koeksister Hill” in the historic Bo-Kaap, so called because as runners reach the peak of the hill, they are greeted by a bevy of residents sugaring these delectable Cape Malay confections before handing them out to delighted participants.

The Slave Route Challenge comprises four separate events. Runners can do as many as they can fit in – a half marathon and a 10km run (both timed and sanctioned by Western Province Athletics), a 10km walk and a 5km fun run. The race beneficiary this year is the Mary Harding School, which provides vital educational assistance to young people who have mild to moderate mental impairment.

Farouk Meyer, event organiser from Itheko Sports Management, who himself is a sub-three-hour marathoner with 10 Two Oceans ultra marathons under his belt, is excited about the new timing of the event, saying: “Hosting the challenge in March potentially opens the event up to a greater audience, including the hordes of international visitors who will be in the Mother City over the period. Because the challenge is as much about getting fit as it is about knowledge sharing, each participant will receive a free voucher to visit the Castle of Good Hope during the month of April as well as entry to the District 6 Museum. On top of this, everyone finishing the challenge will earn a unique medal – part of a series of collectibles.”

While Cape Town hosts a multitude of sporting events, each with their own merit, the Slave Route Challenge is possibly one that has the most meaning. At a time when South Africa faces many challenges, there is no better time to come together to have fun, celebrate our differences and remember our past, while exploring new avenues and embarking on the adventure of the future on the road that lies ahead.

Enter online at Webtickets or at a Sportsman’s Warehouse near you. The closing date is Sunday 17 March.

For more information go to www.slaveroute.co.za or call 082 066 3353.

Calling all runners, walkers, fitness enthusiasts and curious history buffs – one of South Africa’s favourite road races, the Slave Route Challenge, will be taking place on Sunday 31 March.

The Slave Route Challenge was voted road race of the year for 2018 by Western Province Athletics.

Starting in 2011 with just over 2000 runners, last year’s event attracted more than 9000 participants with host club, Brimstone Itheko Sport Athletic Club, expecting to top that in 2019 as March is a traditionally busy period for the Mother City.

Runners and walkers come from all over the country and even from as far away as Reunion Island, as the unique route winds past some of Cape Town’s most prominent heritage sites and provides an opportunity to gain a different perspective on Cape Town’s rich and diverse cultural history.

From City Hall in Darling Street, the route embraces District 6, Gardens, the Company’s Garden, Wale Street, Bo-Kaap, Sea Point (Cape Town Stadium), Green Point (Fort Wynyard), the CBD, up Adderley Street into Spin Street (Slave Plaque) and then through the Castle of Good Hope to finish on the Grand Parade. One of the favourite points has to be “Koeksister Hill” in the historic Bo-Kaap, so called because as runners reach the peak of the hill, they are greeted by a bevy of residents sugaring these delectable Cape Malay confections before handing them out to delighted participants.

The Slave Route Challenge comprises four separate events. Runners can do as many as they can fit in – a half marathon and a 10km run (both timed and sanctioned by Western Province Athletics), a 10km walk and a 5km fun run. The race beneficiary this year is the Mary Harding School, which provides vital educational assistance to young people who have mild to moderate mental impairment.

Farouk Meyer, event organiser from Itheko Sports Management, who himself is a sub-three-hour marathoner with 10 Two Oceans ultra marathons under his belt, is excited about the new timing of the event, saying: “Hosting the challenge in March potentially opens the event up to a greater audience, including the hordes of international visitors who will be in the Mother City over the period. Because the challenge is as much about getting fit as it is about knowledge sharing, each participant will receive a free voucher to visit the Castle of Good Hope during the month of April as well as entry to the District 6 Museum. On top of this, everyone finishing the challenge will earn a unique medal – part of a series of collectibles.”

While Cape Town hosts a multitude of sporting events, each with their own merit, the Slave Route Challenge is possibly one that has the most meaning. At a time when South Africa faces many challenges, there is no better time to come together to have fun, celebrate our differences and remember our past, while exploring new avenues and embarking on the adventure of the future on the road that lies ahead.

Enter online at Webtickets or at a Sportsman’s Warehouse near you.

The closing date is Sunday 17 March. V For more information visit their website on www.slaveroute.co.za or call 082 066 3353

Calling all runners, walkers, fitness enthusiasts and curious history buffs – one of South Africa’s favourite road races, the Slave Route Challenge, will be taking place on Sunday 31 March.

The Slave Route Challenge was voted road race of the year for 2018 by Western Province Athletics.

Starting in 2011 with just over 2000 runners, last year’s event attracted more than 9000 participants with host club, Brimstone Itheko Sport Athletic Club, expecting to top that in 2019 as March is a traditionally busy period for the Mother City. Runners and walkers come from all over the country and even from as far away as Reunion Island, as the unique route winds past some of Cape Town’s most prominent heritage sites and provides an opportunity to gain a different perspective on Cape Town’s rich and diverse cultural history.

From City Hall in Darling Street, the route embraces District 6, Gardens, the Company’s Garden, Wale Street, Bo-Kaap, Sea Point (Cape Town Stadium), Green Point (Fort Wynyard), the CBD, up Adderley Street into Spin Street (Slave Plaque) and then through the Castle of Good Hope to finish on the Grand Parade. One of the favourite points has to be “Koeksister Hill” in the historic Bo-Kaap, so called because as runners reach the peak of the hill, they are greeted by a bevy of residents sugaring these delectable Cape Malay confections before handing them out to delighted participants.

The Slave Route Challenge comprises four separate events. Runners can do as many as they can fit in – a half marathon and a 10km run (both timed and sanctioned by Western Province Athletics), a 10km walk and a 5km fun run. The race beneficiary this year is the Mary Harding School, which provides vital educational assistance to young people who have mild to moderate mental impairment.

Farouk Meyer, event organiser from Itheko Sports Management, who himself is a sub-three-hour marathoner with 10 Two Oceans ultra marathons under his belt, is excited about the new timing of the event, saying: “Hosting the challenge in March potentially opens the event up to a greater audience, including the hordes of international visitors who will be in the Mother City over the period. Because the challenge is as much about getting fit as it is about knowledge sharing, each participant will receive a free voucher to visit the Castle of Good Hope during the month of April as well as entry to the District 6 Museum. On top of this, everyone finishing the challenge will earn a unique medal – part of a series of collectibles.”

While Cape Town hosts a multitude of sporting events, each with their own merit, the Slave Route Challenge is possibly one that has the most meaning. At a time when South Africa faces many challenges, there is no better time to come together to have fun, celebrate our differences and remember our past, while exploring new avenues and embarking on the adventure of the future on the road that lies ahead.

Enter online at Webtickets or at a Sportsman’s Warehouse near you. The closing date is Sunday 17 March.

For more information go to www.slaveroute.co.za or call 082 066 3353.

Calling all runners, walkers, fitness enthusiasts and curious history buffs – one of South Africa’s favourite road races, the Slave Route Challenge, will be taking place on Sunday 31 March.

The Slave Route Challenge was voted road race of the year for 2018 by Western Province Athletics.

Starting in 2011 with just over 2000 runners, last year’s event attracted more than 9000 participants with host club, Brimstone Itheko Sport Athletic Club, expecting to top that in 2019 as March is a traditionally busy period for the Mother City. Runners and walkers come from all over the country and even from as far away as Reunion Island, as the unique route winds past some of Cape Town’s most prominent heritage sites and provides an opportunity to gain a different perspective on Cape Town’s rich and diverse cultural history.

From City Hall in Darling Street, the route embraces District 6, Gardens, the Company’s Garden, Wale Street, Bo-Kaap, Sea Point (Cape Town Stadium), Green Point (Fort Wynyard), the CBD, up Adderley Street into Spin Street (Slave Plaque) and then through the Castle of Good Hope to finish on the Grand Parade. One of the favourite points has to be “Koeksister Hill” in the historic Bo-Kaap, so called because as runners reach the peak of the hill, they are greeted by a bevy of residents sugaring these delectable Cape Malay confections before handing them out to delighted participants.

The Slave Route Challenge comprises four separate events. Runners can do as many as they can fit in – a half marathon and a 10km run (both timed and sanctioned by Western Province Athletics), a 10km walk and a 5km fun run. The race beneficiary this year is the Mary Harding School, which provides vital educational assistance to young people who have mild to moderate mental impairment.

Farouk Meyer, event organiser from Itheko Sports Management, who himself is a sub-three-hour marathoner with 10 Two Oceans ultra marathons under his belt, is excited about the new timing of the event, saying: “Hosting the challenge in March potentially opens the event up to a greater audience, including the hordes of international visitors who will be in the Mother City over the period. Because the challenge is as much about getting fit as it is about knowledge sharing, each participant will receive a free voucher to visit the Castle of Good Hope during the month of April as well as entry to the District 6 Museum. On top of this, everyone finishing the challenge will earn a unique medal – part of a series of collectibles.”

While Cape Town hosts a multitude of sporting events, each with their own merit, the Slave Route Challenge is possibly one that has the most meaning. At a time when South Africa faces many challenges, there is no better time to come together to have fun, celebrate our differences and remember our past, while exploring new avenues and embarking on the adventure of the future on the road that lies ahead.

Enter online at Webtickets or at a Sportsman’s Warehouse near you. The closing date is Sunday 17 March.

For more information go to www.slaveroute.co.za or call 082 066 3353.

Calling all runners, walkers, fitness enthusiasts and curious history buffs – one of South Africa’s favourite road races, the Slave Route Challenge, will be taking place on Sunday 31 March.

The Slave Route Challenge was voted road race of the year for 2018 by Western Province Athletics.

Starting in 2011 with just over 2000 runners, last year’s event attracted more than 9000 participants with host club, Brimstone Itheko Sport Athletic Club, expecting to top that in 2019 as March is a traditionally busy period for the Mother City. Runners and walkers come from all over the country and even from as far away as Reunion Island, as the unique route winds past some of Cape Town’s most prominent heritage sites and provides an opportunity to gain a different perspective on Cape Town’s rich and diverse cultural history.

From City Hall in Darling Street, the route embraces District 6, Gardens, the Company’s Garden, Wale Street, Bo-Kaap, Sea Point (Cape Town Stadium), Green Point (Fort Wynyard), the CBD, up Adderley Street into Spin Street (Slave Plaque) and then through the Castle of Good Hope to finish on the Grand Parade. One of the favourite points has to be “Koeksister Hill” in the historic Bo-Kaap, so called because as runners reach the peak of the hill, they are greeted by a bevy of residents sugaring these delectable Cape Malay confections before handing them out to delighted participants.

The Slave Route Challenge comprises four separate events. Runners can do as many as they can fit in – a half marathon and a 10km run (both timed and sanctioned by Western Province Athletics), a 10km walk and a 5km fun run. The race beneficiary this year is the Mary Harding School, which provides vital educational assistance to young people who have mild to moderate mental impairment.

Farouk Meyer, event organiser from Itheko Sports Management, who himself is a sub-three-hour marathoner with 10 Two Oceans ultra marathons under his belt, is excited about the new timing of the event, saying: “Hosting the challenge in March potentially opens the event up to a greater audience, including the hordes of international visitors who will be in the Mother City over the period. Because the challenge is as much about getting fit as it is about knowledge sharing, each participant will receive a free voucher to visit the Castle of Good Hope during the month of April as well as entry to the District 6 Museum. On top of this, everyone finishing the challenge will earn a unique medal – part of a series of collectibles.”

While Cape Town hosts a multitude of sporting events, each with their own merit, the Slave Route Challenge is possibly one that has the most meaning. At a time when South Africa faces many challenges, there is no better time to come together to have fun, celebrate our differences and remember our past, while exploring new avenues and embarking on the adventure of the future on the road that lies ahead.

Enter online at Webtickets or at a Sportsman’s Warehouse near you. The closing date is Sunday 17 March.

For more information go to www.slaveroute.co.za or call 082 066 3353.

Calling all runners, walkers, fitness enthusiasts and curious history buffs – one of South Africa’s favourite road races, the Slave Route Challenge, will be taking place on Sunday 31 March.

The Slave Route Challenge was voted road race of the year for 2018 by Western Province Athletics.

Starting in 2011 with just over 2000 runners, last year’s event attracted more than 9000 participants with host club, Brimstone Itheko Sport Athletic Club, expecting to top that in 2019 as March is a traditionally busy period for the Mother City. Runners and walkers come from all over the country and even from as far away as Reunion Island, as the unique route winds past some of Cape Town’s most prominent heritage sites and provides an opportunity to gain a different perspective on Cape Town’s rich and diverse cultural history.

From City Hall in Darling Street, the route embraces District 6, Gardens, the Company’s Garden, Wale Street, Bo-Kaap, Sea Point (Cape Town Stadium), Green Point (Fort Wynyard), the CBD, up Adderley Street into Spin Street (Slave Plaque) and then through the Castle of Good Hope to finish on the Grand Parade. One of the favourite points has to be “Koeksister Hill” in the historic Bo-Kaap, so called because as runners reach the peak of the hill, they are greeted by a bevy of residents sugaring these delectable Cape Malay confections before handing them out to delighted participants.

The Slave Route Challenge comprises four separate events. Runners can do as many as they can fit in – a half marathon and a 10km run (both timed and sanctioned by Western Province Athletics), a 10km walk and a 5km fun run. The race beneficiary this year is the Mary Harding School, which provides vital educational assistance to young people who have mild to moderate mental impairment.

Farouk Meyer, event organiser from Itheko Sports Management, who himself is a sub-three-hour marathoner with 10 Two Oceans ultra marathons under his belt, is excited about the new timing of the event, saying: “Hosting the challenge in March potentially opens the event up to a greater audience, including the hordes of international visitors who will be in the Mother City over the period. Because the challenge is as much about getting fit as it is about knowledge sharing, each participant will receive a free voucher to visit the Castle of Good Hope during the month of April as well as entry to the District 6 Museum. On top of this, everyone finishing the challenge will earn a unique medal – part of a series of collectibles.”

While Cape Town hosts a multitude of sporting events, each with their own merit, the Slave Route Challenge is possibly one that has the most meaning. At a time when South Africa faces many challenges, there is no better time to come together to have fun, celebrate our differences and remember our past, while exploring new avenues and embarking on the adventure of the future on the road that lies ahead.

Enter online at Webtickets or at a Sportsman’s Warehouse near you. The closing date is Sunday 17 March.

For more information go to www.slaveroute.co.za or call 082 066 3353.

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