No one to go dry with

2018-02-20 06:01

The Observatory community has joined hands in gearing up for Day Zero. They have established an organisation called Obs Water Warriors. The group is made up of stakeholders from all corners of the community including the neighbourhood watch, the Observatory Civic Association (OCA), Obsid, the local Water Action Committee and individuals.

One of its members, Murray Hunter, says they resorted to establishing this group to try and respond to the water crisis.

He says though the initiative is still taking shape, they are currently using a WhatsApp group as an information sharing platform. “Through these platforms neighbours can help support each other in saving water and preparing ourselves for the Day Zero scenario. One of the positive developments presented at the meeting was a plan to do a community water ‘census’ that would map street by street if there are any elderly, disabled or vulnerable people who would need help collecting water, and identify anyone on their street who would be prepared to lend a hand.”

“At the same time, some of us are part of an initiative called ‘Water Action’, which is focusing on targeting public spaces where we can help change people’s behaviour around water saving. There are very simple steps that members are taking. For example, one of the simplest and most effective water-saving measures is to reduce flushing like ‘if it’s yellow, let it mellow’.”

Hunter says they engage with business owners about ensuring they have signs up that remind people to reduce flushing and save water. They also issue out posters that can be used as reminders. “We have recently started doing regular ‘flush mobs’ where we do a posting campaign in specific locations such as shopping malls and business parks,” he says.

He says through this they hope to reach the water-saving message to the community to try get to that last 45% of people who are still struggling to save. The Obs Water Warriors are coordinating community planning on water saving as well as Day Zero planning. They hope to inspire other civic bodies from neighbouring areas to also start playing their part in preventing Day Zero.

“We know there are other communities that have similar efforts underway. We hope this can be an example that other neighbourhoods can follow, and we would be happy to meet with other civics and neighbourhood organisations to share the lessons we have learned along the way, and how they can get started in their own communities,” he says.

Tauriq Jenkins, OCA chairperson.

“The concern and input shown is overwhelmingly positive. The OCA has responded to both the water tariff proposal and the water bylaw amendment through a broad based and open process of community engagement­.”

Jenkins says they are convening meetings every week alongside various water action groups.

The Observatory community has joined hands in gearing up for Day Zero. They have established an organisation called Obs Water Warriors. The group is made up of stakeholders from all corners of the community including the neighbourhood watch, the Observatory Civic Association (OCA), Obsid, the local Water Action Committee and individuals.

One of its members, Murray Hunter, says they resorted to establishing this group to try and respond to the water crisis.

He says though the initiative is still taking shape, they are currently using a WhatsApp group as an information sharing platform. “Through these platforms neighbours can help support each other in saving water and preparing ourselves for the Day Zero scenario. One of the positive developments presented at the meeting was a plan to do a community water ‘census’ that would map street by street if there are any elderly, disabled or vulnerable people who would need help collecting water, and identify anyone on their street who would be prepared to lend a hand.”

“At the same time, some of us are part of an initiative called ‘Water Action’, which is focusing on targeting public spaces where we can help change people’s behaviour around water saving. There are very simple steps that members are taking. For example, one of the simplest and most effective water-saving measures is to reduce flushing like ‘if it’s yellow, let it mellow’.”

Hunter says they engage with business owners about ensuring they have signs up that remind people to reduce flushing and save water. They also issue out posters that can be used as reminders. “We have recently started doing regular ‘flush mobs’ where we do a posting campaign in specific locations such as shopping malls and business parks,” he says.

He says through this they hope to reach the water-saving message to the community to try get to that last 45% of people who are still struggling to save. The Obs Water Warriors are coordinating community planning on water saving as well as Day Zero planning. They hope to inspire other civic bodies from neighbouring areas to also start playing their part in preventing Day Zero.

“We know there are other communities that have similar efforts underway. We hope this can be an example that other neighbourhoods can follow, and we would be happy to meet with other civics and neighbourhood organisations to share the lessons we have learned along the way, and how they can get started in their own communities,” he says.

Tauriq Jenkins, OCA chairperson.

“The concern and input shown is overwhelmingly positive. The OCA has responded to both the water tariff proposal and the water bylaw amendment through a broad based and open process of community engagement­.”

Jenkins says they are convening meetings every week alongside various water action groups.

The Observatory community has joined hands in gearing up for Day Zero. They have established an organisation called Obs Water Warriors. The group is made up of stakeholders from all corners of the community including the neighbourhood watch, the Observatory Civic Association (OCA), Obsid, the local Water Action Committee and individuals.

One of its members, Murray Hunter, says they resorted to establishing this group to try and respond to the water crisis.

He says though the initiative is still taking shape, they are currently using a WhatsApp group as an information sharing platform. “Through these platforms neighbours can help support each other in saving water and preparing ourselves for the Day Zero scenario. One of the positive developments presented at the meeting was a plan to do a community water ‘census’ that would map street by street if there are any elderly, disabled or vulnerable people who would need help collecting water, and identify anyone on their street who would be prepared to lend a hand.”

“At the same time, some of us are part of an initiative called ‘Water Action’, which is focusing on targeting public spaces where we can help change people’s behaviour around water saving. There are very simple steps that members are taking. For example, one of the simplest and most effective water-saving measures is to reduce flushing like ‘if it’s yellow, let it mellow’.”

Hunter says they engage with business owners about ensuring they have signs up that remind people to reduce flushing and save water. They also issue out posters that can be used as reminders. “We have recently started doing regular ‘flush mobs’ where we do a posting campaign in specific locations such as shopping malls and business parks,” he says.

He says through this they hope to reach the water-saving message to the community to try get to that last 45% of people who are still struggling to save. The Obs Water Warriors are coordinating community planning on water saving as well as Day Zero planning. They hope to inspire other civic bodies from neighbouring areas to also start playing their part in preventing Day Zero.

“We know there are other communities that have similar efforts underway. We hope this can be an example that other neighbourhoods can follow, and we would be happy to meet with other civics and neighbourhood organisations to share the lessons we have learned along the way, and how they can get started in their own communities,” he says.

Tauriq Jenkins, OCA chairperson.

“The concern and input shown is overwhelmingly positive. The OCA has responded to both the water tariff proposal and the water bylaw amendment through a broad based and open process of community engagement­.”

Jenkins says they are convening meetings every week alongside various water action groups.

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