Penguin week brings awareness

2019-04-30 06:01
International Penguin Day was celebrated on Thursday 25 April.PHOTO: Earl Haupt

International Penguin Day was celebrated on Thursday 25 April.PHOTO: Earl Haupt

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Penguins are awesome, right?

As The Two Oceans Aquarium celebrates #PenguinWeek, and World Penguin Day (Thursday 25 April) throughout the world, there’s more to the adorable, endangered penguins than meets the eye...

From the ice-sheets of Antarctica to the shores of the Atacama Desert of South America and the tropical islands of the Galapagos, penguins have adapted to life in all the oceans of the Southern Hemisphere.

Penguin parents

Penguins are excellent parents who share the responsibilities of incubating their eggs and feeding their chicks. When the chicks are old enough, they form crèches, with a few adults always standing guard.

A panoply of penguins

Most taxonomists agree that there are between 16 and 19 species of penguins divided into six families: banded penguins, crested penguins, great penguins, brush-tailed penguins, little-diver penguins and large-diver penguins.

Prehistoric penguins

The oldest penguin fossil found is 62 million years old – its ancestors may have waddled beside the dinosaurs. Some ancient penguins grew larger than humans, and some had red camouflage.

Why the tuxedo?

Penguins’ black and white plumage helps them with thermoregulation and can be used as armour against abrasive winds. It also serves as countershading camouflage. This allows them to coordinate movements when hunting in a group.

Penguins rely on their feathers for warmth and waterproofing. Once a year old, a penguin will eat a lot to stock up on body fat. It will then spend up to three weeks on land losing all its feathers and growing new ones.

Seafood lovers

Most penguin species eat a combination of fish, squid and krill. Overfishing and climate change are forcing penguins to swim further to find food, leading to starvation and chick abandonment.

Mates for life?

Most penguin species are monogamous, with females choosing the same male every season. Penguin couples will only “break up” if one mate fails to return to the colony at the beginning of the breeding season.

Penguins are in trouble

Most penguin species are declining in numbers and most are vulnerable to extinction. For example, in the past 100 years, the African penguin population has declined from millions, to just 21 000 breeding pairs.

Pollution, food scarcity, human settlements, melting ice sheets and rising sea levels are all affecting penguin colonies. Penguins are able to form new colonies, but changes as a result of human activity are happening too quickly for them to recover.

Here’s what you can do to help save Africa’s penguins from extinction:

You can help by choosing WWF SASSI Green seafood. Sardines and anchovies are the seafood choice of African penguins. Overfishing of sardines and anchovies is contributing to the number one threat facing penguins: food scarcity.

You can help by downloading the WWF SASSI app and eating only sustainable seafood options that are green listed.

Local organisations like Sanccob and Apss help save the lives of hundreds of African penguins that are affected by disasters such as oil spills, avian diseases and entanglement. By supporting these organisations you help give penguins a second chance.

Human-caused climate change is affecting the movements of the fish that African penguins eat. This means that adults have to abandon their chicks and swim greater distances in search of food. Contribute to the fight against climate change by using less electricity at home, changing to a plant-based diet, recycling your waste and driving and flying less – the penguins need your help.

Penguins are awesome, right?

As The Two Oceans Aquarium celebrates #PenguinWeek, and World Penguin Day (Thursday 25 April) throughout the world, there’s more to the adorable, endangered penguins than meets the eye...

From the ice-sheets of Antarctica to the shores of the Atacama Desert of South America and the tropical islands of the Galapagos, penguins have adapted to life in all the oceans of the Southern Hemisphere.

Penguin parents

Penguins are excellent parents who share the responsibilities of incubating their eggs and feeding their chicks. When the chicks are old enough, they form crèches, with a few adults always standing guard.

A panoply of penguins

Most taxonomists agree that there are between 16 and 19 species of penguins divided into six families: banded penguins, crested penguins, great penguins, brush-tailed penguins, little-diver penguins and large-diver penguins.

Prehistoric penguins

The oldest penguin fossil found is 62 million years old – its ancestors may have waddled beside the dinosaurs. Some ancient penguins grew larger than humans, and some had red camouflage.

Why the tuxedo?

Penguins’ black and white plumage helps them with thermoregulation and can be used as armour against abrasive winds. It also serves as countershading camouflage. This allows them to coordinate movements when hunting in a group.

Penguins rely on their feathers for warmth and waterproofing.

Once a year old, a penguin will eat a lot to stock up on body fat. It will then spend up to three weeks on land losing all its feathers and growing new ones.

Seafood lovers

Most penguin species eat a combination of fish, squid and krill. Overfishing and climate change are forcing penguins to swim further to find food, leading to starvation and chick abandonment.

Mates for life?

Most penguin species are monogamous, with females choosing the same male every season. Penguin couples will only “break up” if one mate fails to return to the colony at the beginning of the breeding season.

Penguins are in trouble

Most penguin species are declining in numbers and most are vulnerable to extinction. For example, in the past 100 years, the African penguin population has declined from millions, to just 21 000 breeding pairs.

Pollution, food scarcity, human settlements, melting ice sheets and rising sea levels are all affecting penguin colonies.

Penguins are awesome, right?

As The Two Oceans Aquarium celebrates #PenguinWeek, and World Penguin Day (Thursday 25 April) throughout the world, there’s more to the adorable, endangered penguins than meets the eye...

From the ice-sheets of Antarctica to the shores of the Atacama Desert of South America and the tropical islands of the Galapagos, penguins have adapted to life in all the oceans of the Southern Hemisphere.

Penguin parents

Penguins are excellent parents who share the responsibilities of incubating their eggs and feeding their chicks. When the chicks are old enough, they form crèches, with a few adults always standing guard.

A panoply of penguins

Most taxonomists agree that there are between 16 and 19 species of penguins divided into six families: banded penguins, crested penguins, great penguins, brush-tailed penguins, little-diver penguins and large-diver penguins.

Prehistoric penguins

The oldest penguin fossil found is 62 million years old – its ancestors may have waddled beside the dinosaurs. Some ancient penguins grew larger than humans, and some had red camouflage.

Why the tuxedo?

Penguins’ black and white plumage helps them with thermoregulation and can be used as armour against abrasive winds. It also serves as countershading camouflage. This allows them to coordinate movements when hunting in a group.

Penguins rely on their feathers for warmth and waterproofing. Once a year old, a penguin will eat a lot to stock up on body fat. It will then spend up to three weeks on land losing all its feathers and growing new ones.

Seafood lovers

Most penguin species eat a combination of fish, squid and krill. Overfishing and climate change are forcing penguins to swim further to find food, leading to starvation and chick abandonment.

Mates for life?

Most penguin species are monogamous, with females choosing the same male every season. Penguin couples will only “break up” if one mate fails to return to the colony at the beginning of the breeding season.

Penguins are in trouble

Most penguin species are declining in numbers and most are vulnerable to extinction. For example, in the past 100 years, the African penguin population has declined from millions, to just 21 000 breeding pairs.

Pollution, food scarcity, human settlements, melting ice sheets and rising sea levels are all affecting penguin colonies. Penguins are able to form new colonies, but changes as a result of human activity are happening too quickly for them to recover.

Here’s what you can do to help save Africa’s penguins from extinction:

You can help by choosing WWF SASSI Green seafood. Sardines and anchovies are the seafood choice of African penguins. Overfishing of sardines and anchovies is contributing to the number one threat facing penguins: food scarcity.

You can help by downloading the WWF SASSI app and eating only sustainable seafood options that are green listed.

Local organisations like Sanccob and Apss help save the lives of hundreds of African penguins that are affected by disasters such as oil spills, avian diseases and entanglement. By supporting these organisations you help give penguins a second chance.

Human-caused climate change is affecting the movements of the fish that African penguins eat. This means that adults have to abandon their chicks and swim greater distances in search of food. Contribute to the fight against climate change by using less electricity at home, changing to a plant-based diet, recycling your waste and driving and flying less – the penguins need your help.

Penguins are awesome, right?

As The Two Oceans Aquarium celebrates #PenguinWeek, and World Penguin Day (Thursday 25 April) throughout the world, there’s more to the adorable, endangered penguins than meets the eye...

From the ice-sheets of Antarctica to the shores of the Atacama Desert of South America and the tropical islands of the Galapagos, penguins have adapted to life in all the oceans of the Southern Hemisphere.

Penguin parents

Penguins are excellent parents who share the responsibilities of incubating their eggs and feeding their chicks. When the chicks are old enough, they form crèches, with a few adults always standing guard.

A panoply of penguins

Most taxonomists agree that there are between 16 and 19 species of penguins divided into six families: banded penguins, crested penguins, great penguins, brush-tailed penguins, little-diver penguins and large-diver penguins.

Prehistoric penguins

The oldest penguin fossil found is 62 million years old – its ancestors may have waddled beside the dinosaurs. Some ancient penguins grew larger than humans, and some had red camouflage.

Why the tuxedo?

Penguins’ black and white plumage helps them with thermoregulation and can be used as armour against abrasive winds. It also serves as countershading camouflage. This allows them to coordinate movements when hunting in a group.

Penguins rely on their feathers for warmth and waterproofing. Once a year old, a penguin will eat a lot to stock up on body fat. It will then spend up to three weeks on land losing all its feathers and growing new ones.

Seafood lovers

Most penguin species eat a combination of fish, squid and krill.

Overfishing and climate change are forcing penguins to swim further to find food, leading to starvation and chick abandonment.

Mates for life?

Most penguin species are monogamous, with females choosing the same male every season. Penguin couples will only “break up” if one mate fails to return to the colony at the beginning of the breeding season.

Penguins are in trouble

Most penguin species are declining in numbers and most are vulnerable to extinction. For example, in the past 100 years, the African penguin population has declined from millions, to just 21 000 breeding pairs.

Pollution, food scarcity, human settlements, melting ice sheets and rising sea levels are all affecting penguin colonies. Penguins are able to form new colonies, but changes as a result of human activity are happening too quickly for them to recover.

Here’s what you can do to help save Africa’s penguins from extinction:

You can help by choosing WWF SASSI Green seafood. Sardines and anchovies are the seafood choice of African penguins. Overfishing of sardines and anchovies is contributing to the number one threat facing penguins: food scarcity.

You can help by downloading the WWF SASSI app and eating only sustainable seafood options that are green listed.

Local organisations like Sanccob and Apss help save the lives of hundreds of African penguins that are affected by disasters such as oil spills, avian diseases and entanglement.

By supporting these organisations you help give penguins a second chance.

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