Plans pay off big time

2019-02-26 06:00
Lifeguards played an integral role in keeping bathers safe.

Lifeguards played an integral role in keeping bathers safe.

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The City of Cape Town ended the 2018/19 summer peak holiday season on a high by cutting down fatal drowning by a whopping 80% and with 10 of its beaches maintaining the Blue Flag status as quality amenities.

The City’s Identikidz project also added more good news. The project gives young beach visitors identification armbands and registers them to ensure they are able to be reunited with their parents if they get lost. The project saw more than double the number of children tagged compared to the previous year.

Mayco member for community services and health, Zahid Badroodien, said drownings dropped from 19 to 11 year on year.

“There has been a marked reduction in the number of fatal drownings, from 19 during the 2017/2018 season to 11 in the current season, and most of these can be attributed to a decrease in risky behaviour by bathers and the increased allocation of lifeguards. The City’s Recreation and Parks Department also reviewed its drowning prevention strategy early in 2018, which included school visits to raise awareness about water safety,” says Badroodien.

In addition to the deployment of the standard lifeguards, the department also appointed 13 squad leaders who were required to give supervision and guidance to the lifeguards on duty at the respective beaches.

“We also ran an awareness campaign to highlight the most common reasons for drowning,” he says. “A water safety programme was introduced at schools along the coast to increase awareness and provide other important information that may reduce potential risks when swimming. Despite our best efforts, bathers still neglect their own safety.”

Badroodien added that the highlight for the past season had been the City’s Social Development and Early Childhood Development Department’s Identikidz programme.

The programme tagged just over 100 000 children visiting City’s beaches – a 132% increase year-on-year.

Due to the success of the project this season, it was extended for an additional four days until Sunday 6 January.

A total of 535 children were reunited with their parents or caregivers.

The Blue Flag season ended on Thursday 31 January for 10 city beaches, which received the status for achieving the high standards set by the Wildlife and Environment Society of South Africa (Wessa).

The status ensures that residents and visitors are afforded enjoyable recreational spaces and are able to partake in various environmental education programmes at Blue Flag beaches.

Blue Flag is an international accreditation awarded to beaches that display excellence through meeting 33 criteria covering four categories: environmental education and information; water quality; environmental management; and safety and services.

The accreditation is awarded for one season at a time, and if conditions deteriorate at the beach, it can be withdrawn.

The Blue Flag is a monitoring tool used to assist the City in improving and enhancing services and facilities on all public beaches while maintaining the already high standards set at the beaches.

Even though the Blue Flag season has ended, the City says maintains its commitment to high standards of service delivery on beaches.

As the weather is set to remain ideal for the beach for the next few weeks, bathers are reminded to keep the rules in mind and heed the instructions of lifeguards.

“I want to thank our lifeguards for a job well done thus far and commend them for what is often a thankless job. Visitors to the beach have a role to play and I implore them to remain in the designated bathing areas at all times, swim only at beaches where lifeguards are on duty, to not drink and swim, to only swim between the flags, and for adults to supervise their children. Two-thirds of drowning incidents are related to problematic social behaviour. You are reminded not to bring alcohol to the beach because not only is it illegal, but alcohol impairs good judgement. Help us to keep you safe while you have fun,” said Badroodien.

The City of Cape Town ended the 2018/19 summer peak holiday season on a high by cutting down fatal drowning by a whopping 80% and with 10 of its beaches maintaining the Blue Flag status as quality amenities.

Blue Flag is an international accreditation awarded to beaches that display excellence through meeting 33 criteria covering four categories: environmental education and information; water quality; environmental management; and safety and services.

The City’s Identikidz project also added more good news. The project gives young beach visitors identification armbands and registers them to ensure they are able to be reunited with their parents if they get lost. The project saw more than double the number of children tagged compared to the previous year.

The programmetagged just over 100 000 children visiting City’s beaches – a 132% increase year-on-year.

Due to the success of the project this season, it was extended for an additional four days until Sunday 6 January.

A total of 535 children were reunited with their parents or caregivers.

Mayco member for community services and health, Zahid Badroodien, said drownings dropped from 19 to 11 year on year.

“There has been a marked reduction in the number of fatal drownings, from 19 during the 2017/2018 season to 11 in the current season, and most of these can be attributed to a decrease in risky behaviour by bathers and the increased allocation of lifeguards. The City’s Recreation and Parks Department also reviewed its drowning prevention strategy early in 2018, which included school visits to raise awareness about water safety,” says Badroodien.

In addition to the deployment of the standard lifeguards, the department also appointed 13 squad leaders who were required to give supervision and guidance to the lifeguards on duty at the respective beaches.

“We also ran an awareness campaign to highlight the most common reasons for drowning,” he says. “A water safety programme was introduced at schools along the coast to increase awareness and provide other important information that may reduce potential risks when swimming. Despite our best efforts, bathers still neglect their own safety.”

Badroodien added that the highlight for the past season had been the City’s Social Development and Early Childhood Development Department’s Identikidz programme.

The Blue Flag season ended on Thursday 31 January for 10 city beaches, which received the status for achieving the high standards set by the Wildlife and Environment Society of South Africa (Wessa).

The status ensures that residents and visitors are afforded enjoyable recreational spaces and are able to partake in various environmental education programmes at Blue Flag beaches.

The accreditation is awarded for one season at a time, and if conditions deteriorate at the beach, it can be withdrawn.

The Blue Flag is a monitoring tool used to assist the City in improving and enhancing services and facilities on all public beaches while maintaining the already high standards set at the beaches.

Even though the Blue Flag season has ended, the City says maintains its commitment to high standards of service delivery on beaches.

Badroodien thanked lifeguards.

The City of Cape Town ended the 2018/19 summer peak holiday season on a high by cutting down fatal drowning by a whopping 80% and with 10 of its beaches maintaining the Blue Flag status as quality amenities.

The City’s Identikidz project also added more good news. The project gives young beach visitors identification armbands and registers them to ensure they are able to be reunited with their parents if they get lost. The project saw more than double the number of children tagged compared to the previous year.

Mayco member for community services and health, Zahid Badroodien, said drownings dropped from 19 to 11 year on year.

“There has been a marked reduction in the number of fatal drownings, from 19 during the 2017/2018 season to 11 in the current season, and most of these can be attributed to a decrease in risky behaviour by bathers and the increased allocation of lifeguards. The City’s Recreation and Parks Department also reviewed its drowning prevention strategy early in 2018, which included school visits to raise awareness about water safety,” says Badroodien.

In addition to the deployment of the standard lifeguards, the department also appointed 13 squad leaders who were required to give supervision and guidance to the lifeguards on duty at the respective beaches.

“We also ran an awareness campaign to highlight the most common reasons for drowning,” he says. “A water safety programme was introduced at schools along the coast to increase awareness and provide other important information that may reduce potential risks when swimming. Despite our best efforts, bathers still neglect their own safety.”

Badroodien added that the highlight for the past season had been the City’s Social Development and Early Childhood Development Department’s Identikidz programme.

The programme tagged just over 100 000 children visiting City’s beaches – a 132% increase year-on-year.

Due to the success of the project this season, it was extended for an additional four days until Sunday 6 January.

A total of 535 children were reunited with their parents or caregivers.

The Blue Flag season ended on Thursday 31 January for 10 city beaches, which received the status for achieving the high standards set by the Wildlife and Environment Society of South Africa (Wessa).

The status ensures that residents and visitors are afforded enjoyable recreational spaces and are able to partake in various environmental education programmes at Blue Flag beaches.

Blue Flag is an international accreditation awarded to beaches that display excellence through meeting 33 criteria covering four categories: environmental education and information; water quality; environmental management; and safety and services.

The accreditation is awarded for one season at a time, and if conditions deteriorate at the beach, it can be withdrawn.

The Blue Flag is a monitoring tool used to assist the City in improving and enhancing services and facilities on all public beaches while maintaining the already high standards set at the beaches.

Even though the Blue Flag season has ended, the City says maintains its commitment to high standards of service delivery on beaches.

As the weather is set to remain ideal for the beach for the next few weeks, bathers are reminded to keep the rules in mind and heed the instructions of lifeguards.

“I want to thank our lifeguards for a job well done thus far and commend them for what is often a thankless job. Visitors to the beach have a role to play and I implore them to remain in the designated bathing areas at all times, swim only at beaches where lifeguards are on duty, to not drink and swim, to only swim between the flags, and for adults to supervise their children. Two-thirds of drowning incidents are related to problematic social behaviour. You are reminded not to bring alcohol to the beach because not only is it illegal, but alcohol impairs good judgement. Help us to keep you safe while you have fun,” said Badroodien.

The City of Cape Town ended the 2018/19 summer peak holiday season on a high by cutting down fatal drowning by a whopping 80% and with 10 of its beaches maintaining the Blue Flag status as quality amenities.

The City’s Identikidz project also added more good news. The project gives young beach visitors identification armbands and registers them to ensure they are able to be reunited with their parents if they get lost. The project saw more than double the number of children tagged compared to the previous year.

Mayco member for community services and health, Zahid Badroodien, said drownings dropped from 19 to 11 year on year.

“There has been a marked reduction in the number of fatal drownings, from 19 during the 2017/2018 season to 11 in the current season, and most of these can be attributed to a decrease in risky behaviour by bathers and the increased allocation of lifeguards. The City’s Recreation and Parks Department also reviewed its drowning prevention strategy early in 2018, which included school visits to raise awareness about water safety,” says Badroodien.

In addition to the deployment of the standard lifeguards, the department also appointed 13 squad leaders who were required to give supervision and guidance to the lifeguards on duty at the respective beaches.

“We also ran an awareness campaign to highlight the most common reasons for drowning,” he says. “A water safety programme was introduced at schools along the coast to increase awareness and provide other important information that may reduce potential risks when swimming. Despite our best efforts, bathers still neglect their own safety.”

Badroodien added that the highlight for the past season had been the City’s Social Development and Early Childhood Development Department’s Identikidz programme.

The programme tagged just over 100 000 children visiting City’s beaches – a 132% increase year-on-year.

Due to the success of the project this season, it was extended for an additional four days until Sunday 6 January. A total of 535 children were reunited with their parents or caregivers.

The Blue Flag season ended on Thursday 31 January for 10 city beaches, which received the status for achieving the high standards set by the Wildlife and Environment Society of South Africa (Wessa). The status ensures that residents and visitors are afforded enjoyable recreational spaces and are able to partake in various environmental education programmes at Blue Flag beaches. Blue Flag is an international accreditation awarded to beaches that display excellence through meeting 33 criteria covering four categories: environmental education and information; water quality; environmental management; and safety and services.

The accreditation is awarded for one season at a time, and if conditions deteriorate at the beach, it can be withdrawn.

The Blue Flag is a monitoring tool used to assist the City in improving and enhancing services and facilities on all public beaches while maintaining the already high standards set at the beaches.

Even though the Blue Flag season has ended, the City says maintains its commitment to high standards of service delivery on beaches.

As the weather is set to remain ideal for the beach for the next few weeks, bathers are reminded to keep the rules in mind and heed the instructions of lifeguards.

“I want to thank our lifeguards for a job well done thus far and commend them for what is often a thankless job. Visitors to the beach have a role to play and I implore them to remain in the designated bathing areas at all times, swim only at beaches where lifeguards are on duty, to not drink and swim, to only swim between the flags, and for adults to supervise their children. Two-thirds of drowning incidents are related to problematic social behaviour. You are reminded not to bring alcohol to the beach because not only is it illegal, but alcohol impairs good judgement. Help us to keep you safe while you have fun,” said Badroodien.

The City of Cape Town ended the 2018/19 summer peak holiday season on a high by cutting down fatal drowning by a whopping 80% and with 10 of its beaches maintaining the Blue Flag status as quality amenities.

The City’s Identikidz project also added more good news. The project gives young beach visitors identification armbands and registers them to ensure they are able to be reunited with their parents if they get lost. The project saw more than double the number of children tagged compared to the previous year.

Mayco member for community services and health, Zahid Badroodien, said drownings dropped from 19 to 11 year on year.

“There has been a marked reduction in the number of fatal drownings, from 19 during the 2017/2018 season to 11 in the current season, and most of these can be attributed to a decrease in risky behaviour by bathers and the increased allocation of lifeguards. The City’s Recreation and Parks Department also reviewed its drowning prevention strategy early in 2018, which included school visits to raise awareness about water safety,” says Badroodien.

In addition to the deployment of the standard lifeguards, the department also appointed 13 squad leaders who were required to give supervision and guidance to the lifeguards on duty at the respective beaches.

“We also ran an awareness campaign to highlight the most common reasons for drowning,” he says. “A water safety programme was introduced at schools along the coast to increase awareness and provide other important information that may reduce potential risks when swimming. Despite our best efforts, bathers still neglect their own safety.”

Badroodien added that the highlight for the past season had been the City’s Social Development and Early Childhood Development Department’s Identikidz programme.

The programme tagged just over 100 000 children visiting City’s beaches – a 132% increase year-on-year.

Due to the success of the project this season, it was extended for an additional four days until Sunday 6 January.

A total of 535 children were reunited with their parents or caregivers.

The Blue Flag season ended on Thursday 31 January for 10 city beaches, which received the status for achieving the high standards set by the Wildlife and Environment Society of South Africa (Wessa).

The status ensures that residents and visitors are afforded enjoyable recreational spaces and are able to partake in various environmental education programmes at Blue Flag beaches.

Blue Flag is an international accreditation awarded to beaches that display excellence through meeting 33 criteria covering four categories: environmental education and information; water quality; environmental management; and safety and services.

The accreditation is awarded for one season at a time, and if conditions deteriorate at the beach, it can be withdrawn.

The Blue Flag is a monitoring tool used to assist the City in improving and enhancing services and facilities on all public beaches while maintaining the already high standards set at the beaches.

Even though the Blue Flag season has ended, the City says maintains its commitment to high standards of service delivery on beaches. As the weather is set to remain ideal for the beach for the next few weeks, bathers are reminded to keep the rules in mind and heed the instructions of lifeguards.

“I want to thank our lifeguards for a job well done thus far and commend them for what is often a thankless job. Visitors to the beach have a role to play and I implore them to remain in the designated bathing areas at all times, swim only at beaches where lifeguards are on duty, to not drink and swim, to only swim between the flags, and for adults to supervise their children. Two-thirds of drowning incidents are related to problematic social behaviour. You are reminded not to bring alcohol to the beach because not only is it illegal, but alcohol impairs good judgement. Help us to keep you safe while you have fun,” said Badroodien.

The City of Cape Town ended the 2018/19 summer peak holiday season on a high by cutting down fatal drowning by a whopping 80% and with 10 of its beaches maintaining the Blue Flag status as quality amenities.

The City’s Identikidz project also added more good news. The project gives young beach visitors identification armbands and registers them to ensure they are able to be reunited with their parents if they get lost. The project saw more than double the number of children tagged compared to the previous year.

Mayco member for community services and health, Zahid Badroodien, said drownings dropped from 19 to 11 year on year.

“There has been a marked reduction in the number of fatal drownings, from 19 during the 2017/2018 season to 11 in the current season, and most of these can be attributed to a decrease in risky behaviour by bathers and the increased allocation of lifeguards. The City’s Recreation and Parks Department also reviewed its drowning prevention strategy early in 2018, which included school visits to raise awareness about water safety,” says Badroodien.

In addition to the deployment of the standard lifeguards, the department also appointed 13 squad leaders who were required to give supervision and guidance to the lifeguards on duty at the respective beaches.

“We also ran an awareness campaign to highlight the most common reasons for drowning,” he says. “A water safety programme was introduced at schools along the coast to increase awareness and provide other important information that may reduce potential risks when swimming. Despite our best efforts, bathers still neglect their own safety.”

Badroodien added that the highlight for the past season had been the City’s Social Development and Early Childhood Development Department’s Identikidz programme.

The programme tagged just over 100 000 children visiting City’s beaches – a 132% increase year-on-year.Due to the success of the project this season, it was extended for an additional four days until Sunday 6 January.

A total of 535 children were reunited with their parents or caregivers.

The Blue Flag season ended on Thursday 31 January for 10 city beaches, which received the status for achieving the high standards set by the Wildlife and Environment Society of South Africa (Wessa).

The status ensures that residents and visitors are afforded enjoyable recreational spaces and are able to partake in various environmental education programmes at Blue Flag beaches.

Blue Flag is an international accreditation awarded to beaches that display excellence through meeting 33 criteria covering four categories: environmental education and information; water quality; environmental management; and safety and services.The accreditation is awarded for one season at a time, and if conditions deteriorate at the beach, it can be withdrawn.

The Blue Flag is a monitoring tool used to assist the City in improving and enhancing services and facilities on all public beaches while maintaining the already high standards set at the beaches.

Even though the Blue Flag season has ended, the City says maintains its commitment to high standards of service delivery on beaches.As the weather is set to remain ideal for the beach for the next few weeks, bathers are reminded to keep the rules in mind and heed the instructions of lifeguards.“I want to thank our lifeguards for a job well done thus far and commend them for what is often a thankless job. Visitors to the beach have a role to play and I implore them to remain in the designated bathing areas at all times, swim only at beaches where lifeguards are on duty, to not drink and swim, to only swim between the flags, and for adults to supervise their children. Two-thirds of drowning incidents are related to problematic social behaviour. You are reminded not to bring alcohol to the beach because not only is it illegal, but alcohol impairs good judgement. Help us to keep you safe while you have fun,” said Badroodien.

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