Popular drummer celebrated

2018-04-17 06:01
Musician Willie van Bloemenstein’s family, from left, daughter Andrienna de Maar, wife Ingrid van Bloemenstein and daughter Renee van Bloemenstein will cherish the love he showed them while he was still alive.PHOTO: luvuyo mjekula

Musician Willie van Bloemenstein’s family, from left, daughter Andrienna de Maar, wife Ingrid van Bloemenstein and daughter Renee van Bloemenstein will cherish the love he showed them while he was still alive.PHOTO: luvuyo mjekula

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Well-known drummer and jazz maestro Willie van Bloemenstein will be remembered for his passion for music.

His family and community members alike have expressed admiration for his love of the craft.

Van Bloemenstein died aged 89 at the N1 City Hospital on Friday last week. His funeral service was held at his Kensington home on Saturday 14 April.

Van Bloemenstein was among 27 musicians featured in a book titled Jazz People of Cape Town in the early 2000s.

He performed at the Standard Bank International Jazz Festival in Grahamstown and shared the stage with the likes of Dollar Brand, Jimmy Adams, Alan Gordon and Ezra Ngcukana.

Born in District Six in 1928, Van Bloemenstein first made his name when he started playing guitar in a barber shop in Tennant Street at age 21.

After the barbers were finished cutting hair, the shop would close and Van Bloemenstein and his fellows would make music.

He never looked back, going on to be a versatile musician who played different styles of music including dance, American jazz and German music. Another accolade was Van Bloemenstein’s popularity as Cape Town’s foremost ghoema drummer.

The ghoema beat had its origin in Indonesia and was brought to Cape Town by Malay prisoners who were deported by the Dutch and formed the Cape Malay community.

Ghoema is the rhythm of carnival music and it is a basic ingredient in Cape Town jazz.

Van Bloemenstein performed on stages all over Cape Town with various well-known musicians.

His family hopes his son, Gideon, a young drummer, will carry on his father’s legacy.

His wife Ingrid (76) remembers watching her husband perform at the Waterfront. “He was very popular,” she says.

She will remember him as a loving father who was passionate not only about his music but his family too. “He loved his children and ensured he sent them to school,” she says.

His daughters, Renee van Bloemenstein and Andrienna de Maar, share their mother’s sentiments. “He was a jolly, loving and passionate father,” says Andrienna.

But Renee interjects: “But he was very strict and forgiving.”

Local resident and manager of the Kensington Home for the Aged, Reverend Charles Blows, also speaks fondly of Van Bloemenstein. “He was an absolute gentleman. He was very sincere in whatever he did,” says Blows.

He and residents of the home will miss Van Bloemenstein’s performances on Thursdays. “Music was his passion and we are going to miss him.”

Well-known drummer and jazz maestro Willie van Bloemenstein will be remembered for his passion for music.

His family and community members alike have expressed admiration for his love of the craft.

Van Bloemenstein died aged 89 at the N1 City Hospital on Friday last week. His funeral service was held at his Kensington home on Saturday 14 April.

Van Bloemenstein was among 27 musicians featured in a book titled Jazz People of Cape Town in the early 2000s.

He performed at the Standard Bank International Jazz Festival in Grahamstown and shared the stage with the likes of Dollar Brand, Jimmy Adams, Alan Gordon and Ezra Ngcukana.

Born in District Six in 1928, van Bloemenstein first made his name when he started playing guitar in a barber shop in Tennant Street aged 21.

After the barbers were finished cutting hair, the shop would close and van Bloemenstein and his fellows would make music.

He never looked back, going on to be a versatile musician who played different styles of music including dance, American jazz and German music. Another accolade was van Bloemenstein’s popularity as Cape Town’s foremost ghoema drummer.

The ghoema beat had its origin in Indonesia and was brought to Cape Town by Malay prisoners who were deported by the Dutch and formed the Cape Malay community.

Ghoema is the rhythm of carnival music and it is a basic ingredient in Cape Town jazz.

Van Bloemenstein performed on stages all over Cape Town with various well-known musicians.

His family hopes his son, Gideon, a young drummer, will carry on his father’s legacy.

His wife Ingrid (76) remembers watching her husband perform at the Waterfront. “He was very popular,” she says.

She will remember him as a loving father who was passionate not only about his music but his family too. “He loved his children and ensured he sent them to school,” she says.

His daughters, Renee van Bloemenstein and Andrienna de Maar, share their mother’s sentiments. “He was a jolly, loving and passionate father,” says Andrienna.

But Renee interjects: “But he was very strict and forgiving.”

Local resident and manager of the Kensington Home for the Aged, Reverend Charles Blows, also speaks fondly of him. “He was an absolute gentleman. He was very sincere in whatever he did,” says Blows.

He and residents of the home will miss van Bloemenstein’s performances on Thursdays. “Music was his passion and we are going to miss him.”

Well-known drummer and jazz maestro Willie van Bloemenstein will be remembered for his passion for music.

His family and community members alike have expressed admiration for his love of the craft.

Van Bloemenstein died aged 89 at the N1 City Hospital on Friday last week. His funeral service was held at his Kensington home on Saturday 14 April.

Van Bloemenstein was among 27 musicians featured in a book titled Jazz People of Cape Town in the early 2000s.

He performed at the Standard Bank International Jazz Festival in Grahamstown and shared the stage with the likes of Dollar Brand, Jimmy Adams, Alan Gordon and Ezra Ngcukana.

Born in District Six in 1928, van Bloemenstein first made his name when he started playing guitar in a barber shop in Tennant Street, aged 21.

After the barbers were finished cutting hair, the shop would close and van Bloemenstein and his fellows would make music.

He never looked back, going on to be a versatile musician who played different styles of music including dance, American jazz and German music. Another accolade was van Bloemenstein’s popularity as Cape Town’s foremost ghoema drummer.

The ghoema beat had its origin in Indonesia and was brought to Cape Town by Malay prisoners who were deported by the Dutch and formed the Cape Malay community.

Ghoema is the rhythm of carnival music and it is a basic ingredient in Cape Town jazz.

Van Bloemenstein performed on stages all over Cape Town with various well-known musicians.

His family hopes his son, Gideon, a young drummer, will carry on his father’s legacy.

His wife Ingrid (76) remembers watching her husband perform at the Waterfront. “He was very popular,” she says.

She will remember him as a loving father who was passionate not only about his music but his family too. “He loved his children and ensured he sent them to school,” she says.

His daughters, Renee van Bloemenstein and Andrienna de Maar, share their mother’s sentiments. “He was a jolly, loving and passionate father,” says Andrienna.

But Renee interjects: “But he was very strict and forgiving.”

Local resident and manager of the Kensington Home for the Aged, Reverend Charles Blows, also speaks fondly of him. “He was an absolute gentleman. He was very sincere in whatever he did,” says Blows.

He and residents of the home will miss van Bloemenstein’s performances on Thursdays. “Music was his passion and we are going to miss him.”

Well-known drummer and jazz maestro Willie van Bloemenstein will be remembered for his passion for music.

His family and community members alike have expressed admiration for his love of the craft.

Van Bloemenstein died aged 89 at the N1 City Hospital on Friday last week. His funeral service was held at his Kensington home on Saturday 14 April.

Van Bloemenstein was among 27 musicians featured in a book titled Jazz People of Cape Town in the early 2000s.

He performed at the Standard Bank International Jazz Festival in Grahamstown and shared the stage with the likes of Dollar Brand, Jimmy Adams, Alan Gordon and Ezra Ngcukana.

Born in District Six in 1928, van Bloemenstein first made his name when he started playing guitar in a barber shop in Tennant Street, aged 21.

After the barbers were finished cutting hair, the shop would close and van Bloemenstein and his fellows would make music.

He never looked back, going on to be a versatile musician who played different styles of music including dance, American jazz and German music. Another accolade was van Bloemenstein’s popularity as Cape Town’s foremost ghoema drummer.

The ghoema beat had its origin in Indonesia and was brought to Cape Town by Malay prisoners who were deported by the Dutch and formed the Cape Malay community.

Ghoema is the rhythm of carnival music and it is a basic ingredient in Cape Town jazz.

Van Bloemenstein performed on stages all over Cape Town with various well-known musicians.

His family hopes his son, Gideon, a young drummer, will carry on his father’s legacy.

His wife Ingrid (76) remembers watching her husband perform at the Waterfront. “He was very popular,” she says.

She will remember him as a loving father who was passionate not only about his music but his family too. “He loved his children and ensured he sent them to school,” she says.

His daughters, Renee van Bloemenstein and Andrienna de Maar, share their mother’s sentiments. “He was a jolly, loving and passionate father,” says Andrienna.

But Renee interjects: “But he was very strict and forgiving.”

Local resident and manager of the Kensington Home for the Aged, Reverend Charles Blows, also speaks fondly of van Bloemenstein. “He was an absolute gentleman. He was very sincere in whatever he did,” says Blows.

He and residents of the home will miss van Bloemenstein’s performances on Thursdays. “Music was his passion and we are going to miss him.”

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