Set new record through reading

2019-01-22 06:00

With World Read Aloud Day (WRAD) being celebrated on Friday 1 February, Nal’ibali is calling on South Africans to join in the festivities.

Nal’ibali, a non-governmental organisation (NGO) which focuses on reading for enjoyment, is hoping to reach a staggering 1.5 million children on the day. This is about 500 000 more than last year’s target.

WRAD seeks to draw attention to the importance of reading aloud to children in their mother tongue. Every year, thousands of South Africans join in the celebration, for their children, their language and their future. This year Nal’ibali is asking those who are already readers to not only read the story commissioned for WRAD 2019 with their children on the day, but to reach out to their networks and encourage others to do the same and be part of South Africa’s literacy solution.­The NGO says there is huge potential to turn the country’s “literacy crisis” around so that reading becomes a powerful tool to tackle inequality and poverty.

“While education may be the most powerful weapon, reading aloud and storytelling are integral building blocks in learning,” reads a statement from the NGO

This is why Jade Jacobsohn, Nali’bali’s managing director, says: “Every year we commission a brand-new story and translate it into all 11 official SA languages. Then we encourage adults and caregivers across the country to join us in reading it aloud to children on WRAD”.

This year’s story Where Are You? was written by Ann Walton, a well known South African author and illustrator of children’s books. The story can be downloaded from the Nal’ibali website.

“We’d like to encourage South Africans to register that they will be reading aloud and to share pictures of their reading sessions online,” says Jacobsohn.She adds that most of the teaching that happens in a child’s early years is oral, and being able to recognise and understand a wide pool of words better equips them to learn and succeed in the classroom.

“The reading of a story out loud not only shows children the value of books but starts discussions, builds bonds between the reader and the audience and motivates children to learn to read and enjoy books beyond their current reading ability,” says Jacobsohn. “Last year, with the help of our network partners and the public, we managed to read to over a million children. In 2019, our aim is to beat that record and reach 1.5 million!”

In order to monitor the success of WRAD, Nal’ibali asks that all participants log their reading activities on its website: https://nalibali.org/WRAD-2019.

Apart from promoting the Where Are You? story on digital and social media platforms, Nal’ibali’s network of partners – the schools project Story Powered Schools, literacy mentors and FUNda Leader volunteers – will be reading the story aloud at reading clubs and community centres across the country. With the support of the Department of Basic of Education, thousands of school children and teachers will be joining the celebration too.

A special event will be held on the morning of 1 February, at Sandton Library, Johannesburg, with 200 children from Soweto and Alexandra. The event will be attended by this year’s campaign ambassador, children’s author and social activist Lebohang Masango, and is supported by the Department of Education and its Read to Lead campaign.

Masango will give a special multilingual reading of Where Are You? and engage the attending children and adults about the importance of reading aloud. She says: ‘Reading to your children is important because the benefits will follow them for their entire life. Not only is it great for bonding but you are also expanding their vocabulary, their knowledge, their imaginations, their ability to focus and confidently articulate their ideas out loud.

A copy of her own book, Mpumi’s Magic Beads, will be given to each child to further encourage them to keep reading.

If you would like to join the Nal’ibali’s World Read Aloud Day, visit www.nalibali.org or www.nalibali.mobi to download the official story in any of the languages.

With World Read Aloud Day (WRAD) being celebrated on Friday 1 February, Nal’ibali is calling on South Africans to join in the festivities. Nal’ibali, a non-governmental organisation (NGO) which focuses on reading for enjoyment, is hoping to reach a staggering 1.5 million children on the day. This is about 500 000 more than last year’s target.

WRAD seeks to draw attention to the importance of reading aloud to children in their mother tongue. Every year, thousands of South Africans join in the celebration, for their children, their language and their future. This year Nal’ibali is asking those who are already readers to not only read the story commissioned for WRAD 2019 with their children on the day, but to reach out to their networks and encourage others to do the same and be part of South Africa’s literacy solution.The NGO says there is huge potential to turn the country’s “literacy crisis” around so that reading becomes a powerful tool to tackle inequality and poverty. “While education may be the most powerful weapon, reading aloud and storytelling are integral building blocks in learning,” reads a statement from the NGO This is why Jade Jacobsohn, Nali’bali’s managing director, says: “Every year we commission a brand-new story and translate it into all 11 official SA languages. Then we encourage adults and caregivers across the country to join us in reading it aloud to children on WRAD”.

This year’s story Where Are You? was written by Ann Walton, a well known South African author and illustrator of children’s books. The story can be downloaded from the Nal’ibali website. “We’d like to encourage South Africans to register that they will be reading aloud and to share pictures of their reading sessions online,” says Jacobsohn.

Why read aloud?

She adds that most of the teaching that happens in a child’s early years is oral, and being able to recognise and understand a wide pool of words better equips them to learn and succeed in the classroom.“The reading of a story out loud not only shows children the value of books but starts discussions, builds bonds between the reader and the audience and motivates children to learn to read and enjoy books beyond their current reading ability,” says Jacobsohn. “Last year, with the help of our network partners and the public, we managed to read to over a million children. In 2019, our aim is to beat that record and reach 1.5 million!” In order to monitor the success of WRAD, Nal’ibali asks that all participants log their reading activities on its website: https://nalibali.org/WRAD-2019.Apart from promoting the Where Are You? story on digital and social media platforms, Nal’ibali’s network of partners – the schools project Story Powered Schools, literacy mentors and FUNda Leader volunteers – will be reading the story aloud at reading clubs and community centres across the country. With the support of the Department of Basic of Education, thousands of school children and teachers will be joining the celebration too.A special event will be held on the morning of 1 February, at Sandton Library, Johannesburg, with 200 children from Soweto and Alexandra. The event will be attended by this year’s campaign ambassador, children’s author and social activist Lebohang Masango, and is supported by the Department of Education and its Read to Lead campaign.

Masango will give a special multilingual reading of Where Are You? and engage the attending children and adults about the importance of reading aloud. She says: ‘Reading to your children is important because the benefits will follow them for their entire life. Not only is it great for bonding but you are also expanding their vocabulary, their knowledge, their imaginations, their ability to focus and confidently articulate their ideas out loud. Reading is truly the gift that keeps on giving!’A copy of her own book, Mpumi’s Magic Beads, will be given to each child to further encourage them to keep reading.

Community walk

A Nal’ibali mascot and volunteers are scheduled to take to the streets in various communities to promote WRAD while handing out story cards.If you would like to join the Nal’ibali’s World Read Aloud Day, visit www.nalibali.org or www.nalibali.mobi to download the official story.

With World Read Aloud Day (WRAD) being celebrated on Friday 1 February, Nal’ibali is calling on South Africans to join in the festivities.

Nal’ibali, a non-governmental organisation (NGO) which focuses on reading for enjoyment, is hoping to reach a staggering 1.5 million children on the day. This is about 500 000 more than last year’s target.

WRAD seeks to draw attention to the importance of reading aloud to children in their mother tongue. Every year, thousands of South Africans join in the celebration, for their children, their language and their future. This year Nal’ibali is asking those who are already readers to not only read the story commissioned for WRAD 2019 with their children on the day, but to reach out to their networks and encourage others to do the same and be part of South Africa’s literacy solution.­The NGO says there is huge potential to turn the country’s “literacy crisis” around so that reading becomes a powerful tool to tackle inequality and poverty.

“While education may be the most powerful weapon, reading aloud and storytelling are integral building blocks in learning,” reads a statement from the NGO

This is why Jade Jacobsohn, Nali’bali’s managing director, says: “Every year we commission a brand-new story and translate it into all 11 official SA languages. Then we encourage adults and caregivers across the country to join us in reading it aloud to children on WRAD”.

This year’s story Where Are You? was written by Ann Walton, a well known South African author and illustrator of children’s books. The story can be downloaded from the Nal’ibali website. “We’d like to encourage South Africans to register that they will be reading aloud and to share pictures of their reading sessions online,” says Jacobsohn.She adds that most of the teaching that happens in a child’s early years is oral, and being able to recognise and understand a wide pool of words better equips them to learn and succeed in the classroom.“The reading of a story out loud not only shows children the value of books but starts discussions, builds bonds between the reader and the audience and motivates children to learn to read and enjoy books beyond their current reading ability,” says Jacobsohn. “Last year, with the help of our network partners and the public, we managed to read to over a million children. In 2019, our aim is to beat that record and reach 1.5 million!”

In order to monitor the success of WRAD, Nal’ibali asks that all participants log their reading activities on its website: https://nalibali.org/WRAD-2019.

Apart from promoting the Where Are You? story on digital and social media platforms, Nal’ibali’s network of partners – the schools project Story Powered Schools, literacy mentors and FUNda Leader volunteers – will be reading the story aloud at reading clubs and community centres across the country. With the support of the Department of Basic of Education, thousands of school children and teachers will be joining the celebration too.

A special event will be held on the morning of 1 February, at Sandton Library, Johannesburg, with 200 children from Soweto and Alexandra. The event will be attended by this year’s campaign ambassador, children’s author and social activist Lebohang Masango, and is supported by the Department of Education and its Read to Lead campaign.

Masango will give a special multilingual reading of Where Are You? and engage the attending children and adults about the importance of reading aloud. A copy of her own book, Mpumi’s Magic Beads, will be given to each child to further encourage them to keep reading. A Nal’ibali mascot and volunteers are scheduled to take to the streets in various communities to promote WRAD while handing out story cards.If you would like to join the Nal’ibali’s World Read Aloud Day, visit www.nalibali.org or www.nalibali.mobi.

With World Read Aloud Day (WRAD) being celebrated on Friday 1 February, Nal’ibali is calling on South Africans to join in the festivities.

Nal’ibali, a non-governmental organisation (NGO) which focuses on reading for enjoyment, is hoping to reach a staggering 1.5 million children on the day. This is about 500 000 more than last year’s target.

WRAD seeks to draw attention to the importance of reading aloud to children in their mother tongue.

Every year, thousands of South Africans join in the celebration, for their children, their language and their future.

This year Nal’ibali is asking those who are already readers to not only read the story commissioned for WRAD 2019 with their children on the day, but to reach out to their networks and encourage others to do the same and be part of South Africa’s literacy solution.

­The NGO says there is huge potential to turn the country’s “literacy crisis” around so that reading becomes a powerful tool to tackle inequality and poverty.

“While education may be the most powerful weapon, reading aloud and storytelling are integral building blocks in learning,” reads a statement from the NGO.New story in all languages

This is why Jade Jacobsohn, Nali’bali’s managing director, says: “Every year we commission a brand-new story and translate it into all 11 official SA languages. Then we encourage adults and caregivers across the country to join us in reading it aloud to children on WRAD”.

This year’s story Where Are You? was written by Ann Walton, a well known South African author and illustrator of children’s books.

The story can be downloaded from the Nal’ibali website.

“We’d like to encourage South Africans to register that they will be reading aloud and to share pictures of their reading sessions online,” says Jacobsohn.

Why read aloud?

She adds that most of the teaching that happens in a child’s early years is oral, and being able to recognise and understand a wide pool of words better equips them to learn and succeed in the classroom.

“The reading of a story out loud not only shows children the value of books but starts discussions, builds bonds between the reader and the audience and motivates children to learn to read and enjoy books beyond their current reading ability,” says Jacobsohn.

“Last year, with the help of our network partners and the public, we managed to read to over a million children. In 2019, our aim is to beat that record and reach 1.5 million!”

In order to monitor the success of WRAD, Nal’ibali asks that all participants log their reading activities on its website: https://nalibali.org/WRAD-2019.

Apart from promoting the Where Are You? story on digital and social media platforms, Nal’ibali’s network of partners – the schools project Story Powered Schools, literacy mentors and FUNda Leader volunteers – will be reading the story aloud at reading clubs and community centres across the country.

With the support of the Department of Basic of Education, thousands of school children and teachers will be joining the celebration too.

A special event will be held on the morning of 1 February, at Sandton Library, Johannesburg, with 200 children from Soweto and Alexandra.

The event will be attended by this year’s campaign ambassador, children’s author and social activist Lebohang Masango, and is supported by the Department of Education and its Read to Lead campaign.

Masango will give a special multilingual reading of Where Are You? and engage the attending children and adults about the importance of reading aloud.

She says: ‘Reading to your children is important because the benefits will follow them for their entire life.

“Not only is it great for bonding but you are also expanding their vocabulary, their knowledge, their imaginations, their ability to focus and confidently articulate their ideas out loud. Reading is truly the gift that keeps on giving!’

A copy of her own book, Mpumi’s Magic Beads, will be given to each child to further encourage them to keep reading.

Community walk

A Nal’ibali mascot and volunteers are scheduled to take to the streets in various communities to promote WRAD while handing out story cards.

If you would like to join the Nal’ibali’s World Read Aloud Day, visit www.nalibali.org or www.nalibali.mobi to download the official story in any of the languages.

With World Read Aloud Day (WRAD) being celebrated on Friday 1 February, Nal’ibali is calling on South Africans to join in the festivities.

Nal’ibali, a non-governmental organisation (NGO) which focuses on reading for enjoyment, is hoping to reach a staggering 1.5 million children on the day. This is about 500 000 more than last year’s target.

WRAD seeks to draw attention to the importance of reading aloud to children in their mother tongue. Every year, thousands of South Africans join in the celebration, for their children, their language and their future.

This year Nal’ibali is asking those who are already readers to not only read the story commissioned for WRAD 2019 with their children on the day, but to reach out to their networks and encourage others to do the same and be part of South Africa’s literacy solution.­The NGO says there is huge potential to turn the country’s “literacy crisis” around so that reading becomes a powerful tool to tackle inequality and poverty. “While education may be the most powerful weapon, reading aloud and storytelling are integral building blocks in learning,” reads a statement from the NGO

This is why Jade Jacobsohn, Nali’bali’s managing director, says: “Every year we commission a brand-new story and translate it into all 11 official SA languages. Then we encourage adults and caregivers across the country to join us in reading it aloud to children on WRAD”.

This year’s story Where Are You? was written by Ann Walton, a well known South African author and illustrator of children’s books. The story can be downloaded from the Nal’ibali website.

“We’d like to encourage South Africans to register that they will be reading aloud and to share pictures of their reading sessions online,” says Jacobsohn.She adds that most of the teaching that happens in a child’s early years is oral, and being able to recognise and understand a wide pool of words better equips them to learn and succeed in the classroom.

“The reading of a story out loud not only shows children the value of books but starts discussions, builds bonds between the reader and the audience and motivates children to learn to read and enjoy books beyond their current reading ability,” says Jacobsohn. “Last year, with the help of our network partners and the public, we managed to read to over a million children. In 2019, our aim is to beat that record and reach 1.5 million!” In order to monitor the success of WRAD, Nal’ibali asks that all participants log their reading activities on its website: https://nalibali.org/WRAD-2019.

Apart from promoting the Where Are You? story on digital and social media platforms, Nal’ibali’s network of partners – the schools project Story Powered Schools, literacy mentors and FUNda Leader volunteers – will be reading the story aloud at reading clubs and community centres across the country. With the support of the Department of Basic of Education, thousands of school children and teachers will be joining the celebration too.

A special event will be held on the morning of 1 February, at Sandton Library, Johannesburg, with 200 children from Soweto and Alexandra. The event will be attended by this year’s campaign ambassador, children’s author and social activist Lebohang Masango, and is supported by the Department of Education and its Read to Lead campaign.

Masango will give a special multilingual reading of Where Are You? and engage the attending children and adults about the importance of reading aloud. She says: ‘Reading to your children is important because the benefits will follow them for their entire life. Not only is it great for bonding but you are also expanding their vocabulary, their knowledge, their imaginations, their ability to focus and confidently articulate their ideas out loud.

A copy of her own book, Mpumi’s Magic Beads, will be given to each child to further encourage them to keep reading.If you would like to join the Nal’ibali’s World Read Aloud Day, visit www.nalibali.org or www.nalibali.mobi to download the official story in any of the languages.

With World Read Aloud Day (WRAD) being celebrated on Friday 1 February, Nal’ibali is calling on South Africans to join in the festivities. Nal’ibali, a non-governmental organisation (NGO) which focuses on reading for enjoyment, is hoping to reach a staggering 1.5 million children on the day. This is about 500 000 more than last year’s target.

WRAD seeks to draw attention to the importance of reading aloud to children in their mother tongue. Every year, thousands of South Africans join in the celebration, for their children, their language and their future. This year Nal’ibali is asking those who are already readers to not only read the story commissioned for WRAD 2019 with their children on the day, but to reach out to their networks and encourage others to do the same and be part of South Africa’s literacy solution.­

The NGO says there is huge potential to turn the country’s “literacy crisis” around so that reading becomes a powerful tool to tackle inequality and poverty.

“While education may be the most powerful weapon, reading aloud and storytelling are integral building blocks in learning,” reads a statement from the NGO

This is why Jade Jacobsohn, Nali’bali’s managing director, says: “Every year we commission a brand-new story and translate it into all 11 official SA languages. Then we encourage adults and caregivers across the country to join us in reading it aloud to children on WRAD”.

This year’s story Where Are You? was written by Ann Walton, a well known South African author and illustrator of children’s books. The story can be downloaded from the Nal’ibali website.

“We’d like to encourage South Africans to register that they will be reading aloud and to share pictures of their reading sessions online,” says Jacobsohn.She adds that most of the teaching that happens in a child’s early years is oral, and being able to recognise and understand a wide pool of words better equips them to learn and succeed in the classroom.“The reading of a story out loud not only shows children the value of books but starts discussions, builds bonds between the reader and the audience and motivates children to learn to read and enjoy books beyond their current reading ability,” says Jacobsohn. “Last year, with the help of our network partners and the public, we managed to read to over a million children. In 2019, our aim is to beat that record and reach 1.5 million!”

In order to monitor the success of WRAD, Nal’ibali asks that all participants log their reading activities on its website: https://nalibali.org/WRAD-2019.

Apart from promoting the Where Are You? story on digital and social media platforms, Nal’ibali’s network of partners – the schools project Story Powered Schools, literacy mentors and FUNda Leader volunteers – will be reading the story aloud at reading clubs and community centres across the country. With the support of the Department of Basic of Education, thousands of school children and teachers will be joining the celebration too.A special event will be held on the morning of 1 February, at Sandton Library, Johannesburg, with 200 children from Soweto and Alexandra. The event will be attended by this year’s campaign ambassador, children’s author and social activist Lebohang Masango, and is supported by the Department of Education and its Read to Lead campaign.

Masango will give a special multilingual reading of Where Are You? and engage the attending children and adults about the importance of reading aloud. She says: ‘Reading to your children is important because the benefits will follow them for their entire life. Not only is it great for bonding but you are also expanding their vocabulary, their knowledge, their imaginations, their ability to focus and confidently articulate their ideas out loud.

A copy of her own book, Mpumi’s Magic Beads, will be given to each child to further encourage them to keep reading.

A Nal’ibali mascot and volunteers are scheduled to take to the streets in various communities to promote WRAD while handing out story cards.

If you would like to join the Nal’ibali’s World Read Aloud Day, visit www.nalibali.org or www.nalibali.mobi to download the official story in any of the languages.

With World Read Aloud Day (WRAD) being celebrated on Friday 1 February, Nal’ibali is calling on South Africans to join in the festivities. Nal’ibali, a non-governmental organisation (NGO) which focuses on reading for enjoyment, is hoping to reach a staggering 1.5 million children on the day.

This is about 500 000 more than last year’s target.

WRAD seeks to draw attention to the importance of reading aloud to children in their mother tongue. Every year, thousands of South Africans join in the celebration, for their children, their language and their future.

This year Nal’ibali is asking those who are already readers to not only read the story commissioned for WRAD 2019 with their children on the day, but to reach out to their networks and encourage others to do the same and be part of South Africa’s literacy solution.

­The NGO says there is huge potential to turn the country’s “literacy crisis” around so that reading becomes a powerful tool to tackle inequality and poverty.

“While education may be the most powerful weapon, reading aloud and storytelling are integral building blocks in learning,” reads a statement from the NGO

This is why Jade Jacobsohn, Nali’bali’s managing director, says: “Every year we commission a brand-new story and translate it into all 11 official SA languages.

Then we encourage adults and caregivers across the country to join us in reading it aloud to children on WRAD”.

This year’s story Where Are You? was written by Ann Walton, a well known South African author and illustrator of children’s books. The story can be downloaded from the Nal’ibali website.

“We’d like to encourage South Africans to register that they will be reading aloud and to share pictures of their reading sessions online,” says Jacobsohn.

She adds that most of the teaching that happens in a child’s early years is oral, and being able to recognise and understand a wide pool of words better equips them to learn and succeed in the classroom.

“The reading of a story out loud not only shows children the value of books but starts discussions, builds bonds between the reader and the audience and motivates children to learn to read and enjoy books beyond their current reading ability,” says Jacobsohn. “Last year, with the help of our network partners and the public, we managed to read to over a million children.

In 2019, our aim is to beat that record and reach 1.5 million!”

In order to monitor the success of WRAD, Nal’ibali asks that all participants log their reading activities on its website: https://nalibali.org/WRAD-2019.

Apart from promoting the Where Are You? story on digital and social media platforms, Nal’ibali’s network of partners – the schools project Story Powered Schools, literacy mentors and FUNda Leader volunteers – will be reading the story aloud at reading clubs and community centres across the country.

With the support of the Department of Basic of Education, thousands of school children and teachers will be joining the celebration too.A special event will be held on the morning of 1 February, at Sandton Library, Johannesburg, with 200 children from Soweto and Alexandra.

The event will be attended by this year’s campaign ambassador, children’s author and social activist Lebohang Masango, and is supported by the Department of Education and its Read to Lead campaign.

Masango will give a special multilingual reading of Where Are You? and engage the attending children and adults about the importance of reading aloud. She says: ‘Reading to your children is important because the benefits will follow them for their entire life. Not only is it great for bonding but you are also expanding their vocabulary, their knowledge, their imaginations, their ability to focus and confidently articulate their ideas out loud.

A copy of her own book, Mpumi’s Magic Beads, will be given to each child to further encourage them to keep reading.

A Nal’ibali mascot and volunteers are scheduled to take to the streets in various communities to promote WRAD while handing out story cards.

If you would like to join the Nal’ibali’s World Read Aloud Day, visit www.nalibali.org or www.nalibali.mobi to download the official story in any of the languages.

With World Read Aloud Day (WRAD) being celebrated on Friday 1 February, Nal’ibali is calling on South Africans to join in the festivities. Nal’ibali, a non-governmental organisation (NGO) which focuses on reading for enjoyment, is hoping to reach a staggering 1.5 million children on the day. This is about 500 000 more than last year’s target.

WRAD seeks to draw attention to the importance of reading aloud to children in their mother tongue. Every year, thousands of South Africans join in the celebration, for their children, their language and their future. This year Nal’ibali is asking those who are already readers to not only read the story commissioned for WRAD 2019 with their children on the day, but to reach out to their networks and encourage others to do the same and be part of South Africa’s literacy solution.­The NGO says there is huge potential to turn the country’s “literacy crisis” around so that reading becomes a powerful tool to tackle inequality and poverty.

“While education may be the most powerful weapon, reading aloud and storytelling are integral building blocks in learning,” reads a statement from the NGO

This is why Jade Jacobsohn, Nali’bali’s managing director, says: “Every year we commission a brand-new story and translate it into all 11 official SA languages. Then we encourage adults and caregivers across the country to join us in reading it aloud to children on WRAD”.This year’s story Where Are You? was written by Ann Walton, a well known South African author and illustrator of children’s books. The story can be downloaded from the Nal’ibali website. “We’d like to encourage South Africans to register that they will be reading aloud and to share pictures of their reading sessions online,” says Jacobsohn.She adds that most of the teaching that happens in a child’s early years is oral, and being able to recognise and understand a wide pool of words better equips them to learn and succeed in the classroom.

“The reading of a story out loud not only shows children the value of books but starts discussions, builds bonds between the reader and the audience and motivates children to learn to read and enjoy books beyond their current reading ability,” says Jacobsohn. “Last year, with the help of our network partners and the public, we managed to read to over a million children. In 2019, our aim is to beat that record and reach 1.5 million!”

In order to monitor the success of WRAD, Nal’ibali asks that all participants log their reading activities on its website: https://nalibali.org/WRAD-2019.Apart from promoting the Where Are You? story on digital and social media platforms, Nal’ibali’s network of partners – the schools project Story Powered Schools, literacy mentors and FUNda Leader volunteers – will be reading the story aloud at reading clubs and community centres across the country. With the support of the Department of Basic of Education, thousands of school children and teachers will be joining the celebration too.A special event will be held on the morning of 1 February, at Sandton Library, Johannesburg, with 200 children from Soweto and Alexandra. The event will be attended by this year’s campaign ambassador, children’s author and social activist Lebohang Masango, and is supported by the Department of Education and its Read to Lead campaign.

Masango will give a special multilingual reading of Where Are You? and engage the attending children and adults about the importance of reading aloud.A copy of her own book, Mpumi’s Magic Beads, will be given to each child to further encourage them to keep reading.A Nal’ibali mascot and volunteers are scheduled to take to the streets in various communities to promote WRAD while handing out story cards.If you would like to join the Nal’ibali’s World Read Aloud Day, visit www.nalibali.org or www.nalibali.mobi to download the official story in any of the languages.

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