Speaking out on men’s health

2019-11-19 06:00
From left are Garron Gsell, Dr Justin Howlett and Jacob Abrahams who created a comfortable space to talk about men’s issues at Groote Schuur Hospital on Thursday 7 November. PHOTO: Nomzamo Yuku

From left are Garron Gsell, Dr Justin Howlett and Jacob Abrahams who created a comfortable space to talk about men’s issues at Groote Schuur Hospital on Thursday 7 November. PHOTO: Nomzamo Yuku

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The Public is urged to support the annual Movember Campaign aimed at raising awareness about men’s health.

This appeal was made during the informal discussion about the topic at the Groote Schuur Hospital on Thursday 7 November.

The discussion was a collaboration between two non-profit organisations (NPOs), Project Peacock and Men’s Foundation.

Dr Justin Howlett, a urologist at Groote Schuur Hospital, represented Project Peacock as he is its co-founder, while Men’s Foundation was represented by Garron Gsell, the chief executive and its founder. They were joined by a prostate cancer survivor Jacob Abrahams who is one of the patients the campaign has helped.

They all spoke about men’s health issues with more focus on prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health and suicide prevention. They also touched on challenges faced by the affected people, and the availability of treatment.

They also talked about the fairly new Low Dose Rate (LDR) brachytherapy exclusively available at Groote Schuur.

Howlett says LDR is a form of radiation therapy that helps mostly if the diagnosis is done at the early stage of cancer and guarantees a cure.

He says since the treatment was discovered under the belt of Project Peacock, it has so far helped 36 men in two years at an average cost of R35 000 per patient. Howlett says the price is lower than in the private sector, which has in the past made it impossible for most men to access the treatment due to the high cost.

He says the treatment at Groote Schuur is made possible through the kindness of initiatives such as Movember led by Men’s Foundation. This is an international foundation focusing on raising awareness and supporting healthy living among men, creating platforms for discussion, fundraising, and support structures to make it comfortable to seek help and talk about the issues.

Gsell says that though over the years there has been an improvement in eradicating the stigmas related to men’s issues, there is still a long way to go. He says funding is still a priority, followed by the availability of sustainable healthcare systems focusing on men. Gsell says LDR is one of the few successful initiatives they have supported.

Gsell appeals to people to consider donating towards Project Peacock and help a man live longer.

Abrahams was diagnosed with prostate cancer at the beginning of the year and received LDR. He says he had a good experience with it. As a pensioner, Abrahams did not have to pay for the treatment and is grateful to those who donated money and made his journey a smooth ride. “I usually went for testing every year. I happened to skip one year (2018) and to my shock, I tested positive this year. I was so scared, I did not have much knowledge about the availability of treatment. But when I found out I did not have to go far to get the help, I was so relieved,” says Abrahams. He says because his family is genetically prone to prostate cancer, it was not difficult for him to talk about it and seek help.

V For more information about supporting the Movember campaign visit Movember South Africa Facebook page.

The Public is urged to support the annual Movember Campaign aimed at raising awareness about men’s health.

This appeal was made during the informal discussion about the topic at the Groote Schuur Hospital on Thursday 7 November.

The discussion was a collaboration between two non-profit organisations (NPOs), Project Peacock and Men’s Foundation.

Dr Justin Howlett, a urologist at Groote Schuur Hospital, represented Project Peacock as he is its co-founder, while Men’s Foundation was represented by Garron Gsell, the chief executive and its founder. They were joined by a prostate cancer survivor Jacob Abrahams who is one of the patients the campaign has helped.

They all spoke about men’s health issues with more focus on prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health and suicide prevention. They also touched on challenges faced by the affected people, and the availability of treatment.

They also talked about the fairly new Low Dose Rate (LDR) brachytherapy exclusively available at Groote Schuur.

Howlett says LDR is a form of radiation therapy that helps mostly if the diagnosis is done at the early stage of cancer and guarantees a cure.

He says since the treatment was discovered under the belt of Project Peacock, it has so far helped 36 men in two years at an average cost of R35 000 per patient. Howlett says the price is lower than in the private sector, which has in the past made it impossible for most men to access the treatment due to the high cost.

He says the treatment at Groote Schuur is made possible through the kindness of initiatives such as Movember led by Men’s Foundation. This is an international foundation focusing on raising awareness and supporting healthy living among men, creating platforms for discussion, fundraising, and support structures to make it comfortable to seek help and talk about the issues.

Gsell says that though over the years there has been an improvement in eradicating the stigmas related to men’s issues, there is still a long way to go. He says funding is still a priority, followed by the availability of sustainable healthcare systems focusing on men. Gsell says LDR is one of the few successful initiatives they have supported.

Gsell appeals to people to consider donating towards Project Peacock and help a man live longer.

Abrahams was diagnosed with prostate cancer at the beginning of the year and received LDR. He says he had a good experience with it. As a pensioner, Abrahams did not have to pay for the treatment and is grateful to those who donated money and made his journey a smooth ride. “I usually went for testing every year. I happened to skip one year (2018) and to my shock, I tested positive this year. I was so scared, I did not have much knowledge about the availability of treatment. But when I found out I did not have to go far to get the help, I was so relieved,” says Abrahams. He says because his family is genetically prone to prostate cancer, it was not difficult for him to talk about it and seek help.

V For more information about the Movember campaign visit Movember South Africa Facebook page.

The Public is urged to support the annual Movember Campaign aimed at raising awareness about men’s health.

This appeal was made during the informal discussion about the topic at the Groote Schuur Hospital on Thursday 7 November.

The discussion was a collaboration between two non-profit organisations (NPOs), Project Peacock and Men’s Foundation.

Dr Justin Howlett, a urologist at Groote Schuur Hospital, represented Project Peacock as he is its co-founder, while Men’s Foundation was represented by Garron Gsell, the chief executive and its founder. They were joined by a prostate cancer survivor Jacob Abrahams who is one of the patients the campaign has helped.

They all spoke about men’s health issues with more focus on prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health and suicide prevention. They also touched on challenges faced by the affected people, and the availability of treatment.

They also talked about the fairly new Low Dose Rate (LDR) brachytherapy exclusively available at Groote Schuur.

Howlett says LDR is a form of radiation therapy that helps mostly if the diagnosis is done at the early stage of cancer and guarantees a cure. He says since the treatment was discovered under the belt of Project Peacock, it has so far helped 36 men in two years at an average cost of R35 000 per patient. Howlett says the price is lower than in the private sector, which has in the past made it impossible for most men to access the treatment due to the high cost.

He says the treatment at Groote Schuur is made possible through the kindness of initiatives such as Movember led by Men’s Foundation. This is an international foundation focusing on raising awareness and supporting healthy living among men, creating platforms for discussion, fundraising, and support structures to make it comfortable to seek help and talk about the issues.

Gsell says that though over the years there has been an improvement in eradicating the stigmas related to men’s issues, there is still a long way to go. He says funding is still a priority, followed by the availability of sustainable healthcare systems focusing on men. Gsell says LDR is one of the few successful initiatives they have supported.

Gsell appeals to people to consider donating towards Project Peacock and help a man live longer. Abrahams was diagnosed with prostate cancer at the beginning of the year and received LDR. He says he had a good experience with it. As a pensioner, Abrahams did not have to pay for the treatment and is grateful to those who donated money and made his journey a smooth ride. “I usually went for testing every year. I happened to skip one year (2018) and to my shock, I tested positive this year. I was so scared, I did not have much knowledge about the availability of treatment. But when I found out I did not have to go far to get the help, I was so relieved,” says Abrahams. He says because his family is genetically prone to prostate cancer, it was not difficult for him to talk about it and seek help.

V For more information about the Movember campaign visit Movember South Africa Facebook page.

The Public is urged to support the annual Movember Campaign aimed at raising awareness about men’s health.

This appeal was made during the informal discussion about the topic at the Groote Schuur Hospital on Thursday 7 November.

The discussion was a collaboration between two non-profit organisations (NPOs), Project Peacock and Men’s Foundation.

Dr Justin Howlett, a urologist at Groote Schuur Hospital, represented Project Peacock as he is its co-founder, while Men’s Foundation was represented by Garron Gsell, the chief executive and its founder. They were joined by a prostate cancer survivor Jacob Abrahams who is one of the patients the campaign has helped.

They all spoke about men’s health issues with more focus on prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health and suicide prevention. They also touched on challenges faced by the affected people, and the availability of treatment.

They also talked about the fairly new Low Dose Rate (LDR) brachytherapy exclusively available at Groote Schuur.

Howlett says LDR is a form of radiation therapy that helps mostly if the diagnosis is done at the early stage of cancer and guarantees a cure. He says since the treatment was discovered under the belt of Project Peacock, it has so far helped 36 men in two years at an average cost of R35 000 per patient. Howlett says the price is lower than in the private sector, which has in the past made it impossible for most men to access the treatment due to the high cost.

He says the treatment at Groote Schuur is made possible through the kindness of initiatives such as Movember led by Men’s Foundation. This is an international foundation focusing on raising awareness and supporting healthy living among men, creating platforms for discussion, fundraising, and support structures to make it comfortable to seek help and talk about the issues.

Gsell says that though over the years there has been an improvement in eradicating the stigmas related to men’s issues, there is still a long way to go. He says funding is still a priority, followed by the availability of sustainable healthcare systems focusing on men. Gsell says LDR is one of the few successful initiatives they have supported.

Gsell appeals to people to consider donating towards Project Peacock and help a man live longer. Abrahams was diagnosed with prostate cancer at the beginning of the year and received LDR. He says he had a good experience with it. As a pensioner, Abrahams did not have to pay for the treatment and is grateful to those who donated money and made his journey a smooth ride. “I usually went for testing every year. I happened to skip one year (2018) and to my shock, I tested positive this year. I was so scared, I did not have much knowledge about the availability of treatment. But when I found out I did not have to go far to get the help, I was so relieved,” says Abrahams. He says because his family is genetically prone to prostate cancer, it was not difficult for him to talk about it and seek help.

V For more information about the Movember campaign visit Movember South Africa Facebook page.

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