Stamps for Ma Albertina Sisulu

2019-02-26 06:01
Stamps of Albertina Sisulu.

Stamps of Albertina Sisulu.

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Just over a century after the birth of freedom struggle heroine, Albertina Sisulu, the South African Post Office (Sapo) has issued two stamps celebrating her life, her achievements and her contribution to a democratic South Africa.

Designed in-house by the Sapo designers, the photographs were obtained from the family archives. Each of the two stamps celebrating Sisulu features a different stage of her life.

Appropriately for a woman who dedicated her life to fighting for democracy, the stamps can be used as postage on any ordinary South African standard letter. The stamps are available at all post offices and can also be ordered from SA.stamps@postoffice.co.za.

Looking back from where it all begun for Sisulu, there was great jubilation in the Thethiwe household at Tsomo in the Transkei when their first daughter was born on 21 October 1918. She was named Nontsikelelo, “the blessed girl”.

Her name did not last long. When starting school in Xolobeni, Nontsikelelo adopted the name Albertina as African children had to have “Christian” name for school.

Nontsikelelo, now also called Albertina, was a brilliant student. She ended up receiving a scholarship for high school at Mariazell College in Matatiele, in the Eastern Cape, where she converted to Catholicism.

She seriously considered becoming a nun, but was persuaded to study nursing instead as she could get paid while studying and could still be of service to the people. Albertina was accepted as a trainee nurse at a Johannesburg “non-European” hospital called Johannesburg General and left Xolobeni for Johannesburg in January 1940.

As a child brought up in a rural area, racism came as a shock to her when, as a trainee nurse, it became clear to her that black lives mattered less to the administrators and black nurses had unreasonable restrictions imposed on them to the extent that in 1941 she was denied leave to attend her mother’s funeral. In the same year, Albertina met Walter Sisulu, whom she married in 1944. Nelson Mandela and his wife at the time, Evelyn, were best man and bridesmaid at the Sisulus’ wedding.

The ANC Women’s League was formed in 1948. Albertina joined as a member and began a life as an anti-apartheid activist in her own right.

She was one of the organisers of the historic anti-pass women’s march of 1956. She also led the fight against the introduction of Bantu Education and even made her house at Orlando available for use as a school.

Albertina had the debatable honour of being the first woman ever to be arrested under the General Laws Amendment Act. The Act gave the police the power to hold suspects in detention for 90 days without charge, and Albertina was held in solitary confinement for almost two months. This was a precursor to her life as a banned person in South Africa.

By July 1981, Albertina had been banned for 18 years – the longest ban of any person in South Africa.

When her husband, Walter, was released from prison as one of the Rivonia trialists together with Mandela and others, they had been apart for at least 25 years. Despite years of hardship, she had kept the home fires burning and realised the fruit of her activism.

In 2017 the University of Johannesburg awarded Albertina Sisulu an honorary doctorate in acknowledgement of her revolutionary role in pre-1994 South Africa.

In 2004 Ma Sisulu, as she was affectionately known by the South African public, was voted 57th on the SABC3 list of Great South Africans. She died on 2 June 2011 at her home in Linden, Johannesburg.

Just over a century after the birth of freedom struggle heroine, Albertina Sisulu, the South African Post Office (Sapo) has issued two stamps celebrating her life, her achievements and her contribution to a democratic South Africa.

Designed in-house by the Sapo designers, the photographs were obtained from the family archives. Each of the two stamps celebrating Sisulu features a different stage of her life.

Appropriately for a woman who dedicated her life to fighting for democracy, the stamps can be used as postage on any ordinary South African standard letter. The stamps are available at all post offices and can also be ordered from SA.stamps@postoffice.co.za.

Looking back from where it all begun for Sisulu, there was great jubilation in the Thethiwe household at Tsomo in the Transkei when their first daughter was born on 21 October 1918. She was named Nontsikelelo, “the blessed girl”.

Her name did not last long. When starting school in Xolobeni, Nontsikelelo adopted the name Albertina as African children had to have “Christian” name for school.

Nontsikelelo, now also called Albertina, was a brilliant student. She ended up receiving a scholarship for high school at Mariazell College in Matatiele, in the Eastern Cape, where she converted to Catholicism.

She seriously considered becoming a nun, but was persuaded to study nursing instead as she could get paid while studying and could still be of service to the people. Albertina was accepted as a trainee nurse at a Johannesburg “non-European” hospital called Johannesburg General and left Xolobeni for Johannesburg in January 1940.

As a child brought up in a rural area, racism came as a shock to her when, as a trainee nurse, it became clear to her that black lives mattered less to the administrators and black nurses had unreasonable restrictions imposed on them to the extent that in 1941 she was denied leave to attend her mother’s funeral. In the same year, Albertina met Walter Sisulu, whom she married in 1944. Nelson Mandela and his wife at the time, Evelyn, were best man and bridesmaid at the Sisulus’ wedding.

The ANC Women’s League was formed in 1948. Albertina joined as a member and began a life as an anti-apartheid activist in her own right.

She was one of the organisers of the historic anti-pass women’s march of 1956. She also led the fight against the introduction of Bantu Education and even made her house at Orlando available for use as a school.

Albertina had the debatable honour of being the first woman ever to be arrested under the General Laws Amendment Act. The Act gave the police the power to hold suspects in detention for 90 days without charge, and Albertina was held in solitary confinement for almost two months. This was a precursor to her life as a banned person in South Africa.

By July 1981, Albertina had been banned for 18 years – the longest ban of any person in South Africa.

When her husband, Walter, was released from prison as one of the Rivonia trialists together with Mandela and others, they had been apart for at least 25 years. Despite years of hardship, she had kept the home fires burning and realised the fruit of her activism.

In 2017 the University of Johannesburg awarded Albertina Sisulu an honorary doctorate in acknowledgement of her revolutionary role in pre-1994 South Africa.

In 2004 Ma Sisulu, as she was affectionately known by the South African public, was voted 57th on the SABC3 list of Great South Africans. She died on 2 June 2011 at her home in Linden, Johannesburg.

Just over a century after the birth of freedom struggle heroine, Albertina Sisulu, the South African Post Office (Sapo) has issued two stamps celebrating her life, her achievements and her contribution to a democratic South Africa.

Designed in-house by the Sapo designers, the photographs were obtained from the family archives. Each of the two stamps celebrating Sisulu features a different stage of her life.

Appropriately for a woman who dedicated her life to fighting for democracy, the stamps can be used as postage on any ordinary South African standard letter. The stamps are available at all post offices and can also be ordered from SA.stamps@postoffice.co.za.

Looking back from where it all begun for Sisulu, there was great jubilation in the Thethiwe household at Tsomo in the Transkei when their first daughter was born on 21 October 1918. She was named Nontsikelelo, “the blessed girl”.

Her name did not last long. When starting school in Xolobeni, Nontsikelelo adopted the name Albertina as African children had to have “Christian” name for school.

Nontsikelelo, now also called Albertina, was a brilliant student. She ended up receiving a scholarship for high school at Mariazell College in Matatiele, in the Eastern Cape, where she converted to Catholicism.

She seriously considered becoming a nun, but was persuaded to study nursing instead as she could get paid while studying and could still be of service to the people. Albertina was accepted as a trainee nurse at a Johannesburg “non-European” hospital called Johannesburg General and left Xolobeni for Johannesburg in January 1940.

As a child brought up in a rural area, racism came as a shock to her when, as a trainee nurse, it became clear to her that black lives mattered less to the administrators and black nurses had unreasonable restrictions imposed on them to the extent that in 1941 she was denied leave to attend her mother’s funeral. In the same year, Albertina met Walter Sisulu, whom she married in 1944. Nelson Mandela and his wife at the time, Evelyn, were best man and bridesmaid at the Sisulus’ wedding.

The ANC Women’s League was formed in 1948. Albertina joined as a member and began a life as an anti-apartheid activist in her own right.

She was one of the organisers of the historic anti-pass women’s march of 1956. She also led the fight against the introduction of Bantu Education and even made her house at Orlando available for use as a school.

Albertina had the debatable honour of being the first woman ever to be arrested under the General Laws Amendment Act. The Act gave the police the power to hold suspects in detention for 90 days without charge, and Albertina was held in solitary confinement for almost two months. This was a precursor to her life as a banned person in South Africa.

By July 1981, Albertina had been banned for 18 years – the longest ban of any person in South Africa.

When her husband, Walter, was released from prison as one of the Rivonia trialists together with Mandela and others, they had been apart for at least 25 years. Despite years of hardship, she had kept the home fires burning and realised the fruit of her activism.

In 2017 the University of Johannesburg awarded Albertina Sisulu an honorary doctorate in acknowledgement of her revolutionary role in pre-1994 South Africa.

In 2004 Ma Sisulu, as she was affectionately known by the South African public, was voted 57th on the SABC3 list of Great South Africans. She died on 2 June 2011 at her home in Linden, Johannesburg.

Just over a century after the birth of freedom struggle heroine, Albertina Sisulu, the South African Post Office (Sapo) has issued two stamps celebrating her life, her achievements and her contribution to a democratic South Africa.

Designed in-house by the Sapo designers, the photographs were obtained from the family archives. Each of the two stamps celebrating Sisulu features a different stage of her life.

Appropriately for a woman who dedicated her life to fighting for democracy, the stamps can be used as postage on any ordinary South African standard letter. The stamps are available at all post offices and can also be ordered from SA.stamps@postoffice.co.za.

Looking back from where it all begun for Sisulu, there was great jubilation in the Thethiwe household at Tsomo in the Transkei when their first daughter was born on 21 October 1918. She was named Nontsikelelo, “the blessed girl”.

Her name did not last long. When starting school in Xolobeni, Nontsikelelo adopted the name Albertina as African children had to have “Christian” name for school.

Nontsikelelo, now also called Albertina, was a brilliant student. She ended up receiving a scholarship for high school at Mariazell College in Matatiele, in the Eastern Cape, where she converted to Catholicism.

She seriously considered becoming a nun, but was persuaded to study nursing instead as she could get paid while studying and could still be of service to the people. Albertina was accepted as a trainee nurse at a Johannesburg “non-European” hospital called Johannesburg General and left Xolobeni for Johannesburg in January 1940.

As a child brought up in a rural area, racism came as a shock to her when, as a trainee nurse, it became clear to her that black lives mattered less to the administrators and black nurses had unreasonable restrictions imposed on them to the extent that in 1941 she was denied leave to attend her mother’s funeral. In the same year, Albertina met Walter Sisulu, whom she married in 1944. Nelson Mandela and his wife at the time, Evelyn, were best man and bridesmaid at the Sisulus’ wedding.

The ANC Women’s League was formed in 1948. Albertina joined as a member and began a life as an anti-apartheid activist in her own right.

She was one of the organisers of the historic anti-pass women’s march of 1956. She also led the fight against the introduction of Bantu Education and even made her house at Orlando available for use as a school.

Albertina had the debatable honour of being the first woman ever to be arrested under the General Laws Amendment Act. The Act gave the police the power to hold suspects in detention for 90 days without charge, and Albertina was held in solitary confinement for almost two months. This was a precursor to her life as a banned person in South Africa.

By July 1981, Albertina had been banned for 18 years – the longest ban of any person in South Africa.

When her husband, Walter, was released from prison as one of the Rivonia trialists together with Mandela and others, they had been apart for at least 25 years. Despite years of hardship, she had kept the home fires burning and realised the fruit of her activism.

In 2017 the University of Johannesburg awarded Albertina Sisulu an honorary doctorate in acknowledgement of her revolutionary role in pre-1994 South Africa.

In 2004 Ma Sisulu, as she was affectionately known by the South African public, was voted 57th on the SABC3 list of Great South Africans. She died on 2 June 2011 at her home in Linden, Johannesburg.

Just over a century after the birth of freedom struggle heroine, Albertina Sisulu, the South African Post Office (Sapo) has issued two stamps celebrating her life, her achievements and her contribution to a democratic South Africa.

Designed in-house by the Sapo designers, the photographs were obtained from the family archives. Each of the two stamps celebrating Sisulu features a different stage of her life.

Appropriately for a woman who dedicated her life to fighting for democracy, the stamps can be used as postage on any ordinary South African standard letter. The stamps are available at all post offices and can also be ordered from SA.stamps@postoffice.co.za.

Looking back from where it all begun for Sisulu, there was great jubilation in the Thethiwe household at Tsomo in the Transkei when their first daughter was born on 21 October 1918. She was named Nontsikelelo, “the blessed girl”.

Her name did not last long. When starting school in Xolobeni, Nontsikelelo adopted the name Albertina as African children had to have “Christian” name for school.

Nontsikelelo, now also called Albertina, was a brilliant student. She ended up receiving a scholarship for high school at Mariazell College in Matatiele, in the Eastern Cape, where she converted to Catholicism.

She seriously considered becoming a nun, but was persuaded to study nursing instead as she could get paid while studying and could still be of service to the people. Albertina was accepted as a trainee nurse at a Johannesburg “non-European” hospital called Johannesburg General and left Xolobeni for Johannesburg in January 1940.

As a child brought up in a rural area, racism came as a shock to her when, as a trainee nurse, it became clear to her that black lives mattered less to the administrators and black nurses had unreasonable restrictions imposed on them to the extent that in 1941 she was denied leave to attend her mother’s funeral. In the same year, Albertina met Walter Sisulu, whom she married in 1944. Nelson Mandela and his wife at the time, Evelyn, were best man and bridesmaid at the Sisulus’ wedding.

The ANC Women’s League was formed in 1948. Albertina joined as a member and began a life as an anti-apartheid activist in her own right.

She was one of the organisers of the historic anti-pass women’s march of 1956. She also led the fight against the introduction of Bantu Education and even made her house at Orlando available for use as a school.

Albertina had the debatable honour of being the first woman ever to be arrested under the General Laws Amendment Act. The Act gave the police the power to hold suspects in detention for 90 days without charge, and Albertina was held in solitary confinement for almost two months. This was a precursor to her life as a banned person in South Africa.

By July 1981, Albertina had been banned for 18 years – the longest ban of any person in South Africa.

When her husband, Walter, was released from prison as one of the Rivonia trialists together with Mandela and others, they had been apart for at least 25 years. Despite years of hardship, she had kept the home fires burning and realised the fruit of her activism.

In 2017 the University of Johannesburg awarded Albertina Sisulu an honorary doctorate in acknowledgement of her revolutionary role in pre-1994 South Africa.

In 2004 Ma Sisulu, as she was affectionately known by the South African public, was voted 57th on the SABC3 list of Great South Africans. She died on 2 June 2011 at her home in Linden, Johannesburg.

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