The journey of relations

2018-10-30 06:00
Kanya Viljoen

Kanya Viljoen

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A new young play-write is almost set to put on her first production at the Baxter, when her play Raak takes to the stage in December.

Fresh from graduating in Theatre and Performance at the University of Cape Town, Kanya Viljoen’s Afrikaans play is the story of a single evening that unfolds into a lifetime shared between a husband and a wife, their beginning and the beginning of their end.

Viljoen (24), who grew up in Somerset West, says the play was inspired by a mixture of fact and fiction in her own life.

“I grew up in a relatively small Afrikaans community and it lingered with me how dreams and expectations shift as we grow older, sometimes due to the realities in which we find ourselves. Relationships change and I kept on wondering if it was truly for the better. The fictional element comes from my love of reading. N.P. van Wyk Louw’s Raka forms such a crucial part of the Afrikaans literary canon and I was interested in re-imagining and rewriting this literature. Thus, it forms quite an intricate part of the script,” she says.

The play can resonate with everyone, says Viljoen.

“I think what has made this play so relatable to such a wide audience is the fact that it is based on a very simple truth – that of human relationships. We all can relate to falling in love with the matric boy at school, and then catching yourself within a relationship, not sure how you have gotten to that point. Therefore, I think everyone that comes to Raak leaves with an essential truth that they know about themselves,” she says.

Viljoen started her journey in the arts at a young age with interests in poetry, music and dance.

“My poor parents – I think I must have made them sit through endless hours of impromptu performances. So, it’s always been such an intrinsic part of how I expressed myself within the world, that studying Theatre and Performance seemed like a very organic next step. It never felt like I had any other choice,” she says.

While the arts may be a dying medium for some, Viljoen believes in the power it holds.

“I am so fortunate to find myself in the world of the arts and every day I am reminded of the power of theatre and performance. There is such an immense amount of power in the stories we tell, in who we put on stage and in how we imagine ourselves on stage. If I could leave anyone with some words of advice, it would be to never underestimate the value of your own voice and the telling of your own story.

“What really excites me about theatre is the endless amounts of forms it holds within itself; the power it has to serve as metaphor and as symbol; the fact that one object can be opened up to a multitude of meanings and interpretations. What it really means is that we, as theatre-makers, have an endless amount of possibilities within our reach and that’s exciting,” she says.

Viljoen says she will certainly continue writing plays and hopes to put together many more productions.

“There are quite a few projects that are waiting to be performed and written. I don’t think I have a favourite genre, per se, but I do enjoy using myths and folklore within my writing. There is something quite wonderful about being able to write your own interpretation or re-imagine a story that has existed for many years before.”

V Raak will be performed at the Baxter Masambe Theatre from Thursday 6 to Saturday 8 December. Tickets cost R70 and R50 for students and pensioners. Tickets are available through webtickets.co.za.

A new young play-write is almost set to put on her first production at the Baxter, when her play Raak takes to the stage in December.

Fresh from graduating in Theatre and Performance at the University of Cape Town, Kanya Viljoen’s Afrikaans play is the story of a single evening that unfolds into a lifetime shared between a husband and a wife, their beginning and the beginning of their end.

Viljoen (24), who grew up in Somerset West, says the play was inspired by a mixture of fact and fiction in her own life.

“I grew up in a relatively small Afrikaans community and it lingered with me how dreams and expectations shift as we grow older, sometimes due to the realities in which we find ourselves. Relationships change and I kept on wondering if it was truly for the better. The fictional element comes from my love of reading. N.P. van Wyk Louw’s Raka forms such a crucial part of the Afrikaans literary canon and I was interested in re-imagining and rewriting this literature. Thus, it forms quite an intricate part of the script,” she says.

The play can resonate with everyone, says Viljoen.

“I think what has made this play so relatable to such a wide audience is the fact that it is based on a very simple truth – that of human relationships. We all can relate to falling in love with the matric boy at school, and then catching yourself within a relationship, not sure how you have gotten to that point. Therefore, I think everyone that comes to Raak leaves with an essential truth that they know about themselves,” she says.

Viljoen started her journey in the arts at a young age with interests in poetry, music and dance.

“My poor parents – I think I must have made them sit through endless hours of impromptu performances. So, it’s always been such an intrinsic part of how I expressed myself within the world, that studying Theatre and Performance seemed like a very organic next step. It never felt like I had any other choice,” she says.

While the arts may be a dying medium for some, Viljoen believes in the power it holds.

“I am so fortunate to find myself in the world of the arts and every day I am reminded of the power of theatre and performance. There is such an immense amount of power in the stories we tell, in who we put on stage and in how we imagine ourselves on stage. If I could leave anyone with some words of advice, it would be to never underestimate the value of your own voice and the telling of your own story.

“What really excites me about theatre is the endless amounts of forms it holds within itself; the power it has to serve as metaphor and as symbol; the fact that one object can be opened up to a multitude of meanings and interpretations. What it really means is that we, as theatre-makers, have an endless amount of possibilities within our reach and that’s exciting,” she says.

Viljoen says she will certainly continue writing plays and hopes to put together many more productions.

“There are quite a few projects that are waiting to be performed and written. I don’t think I have a favourite genre, per se, but I do enjoy using myths and folklore within my writing. There is something quite wonderful about being able to write your own interpretation or re-imagine a story that has existed for many years before.”

V Raak will be performed at the Baxter Masambe Theatre from Thursday 6 to Saturday 8 December. Tickets cost R70 and R50 for students and pensioners. Tickets are available through webtickets.co.za.

A new young play-write is almost set to put on her first production at the Baxter, when her play Raak takes to the stage in December.

Fresh from graduating in Theatre and Performance at the University of Cape Town, Kanya Viljoen’s Afrikaans play is the story of a single evening that unfolds into a lifetime shared between a husband and a wife, their beginning and the beginning of their end.

Viljoen (24), who grew up in Somerset West, says the play was inspired by a mixture of fact and fiction in her own life.

“I grew up in a relatively small Afrikaans community and it lingered with me how dreams and expectations shift as we grow older, sometimes due to the realities in which we find ourselves. Relationships change and I kept on wondering if it was truly for the better. The fictional element comes from my love of reading. N.P. van Wyk Louw’s Raka forms such a crucial part of the Afrikaans literary canon and I was interested in re-imagining and rewriting this literature. Thus, it forms quite an intricate part of the script,” she says.

The play can resonate with everyone, says Viljoen.

“I think what has made this play so relatable to such a wide audience is the fact that it is based on a very simple truth – that of human relationships. We all can relate to falling in love with the matric boy at school, and then catching yourself within a relationship, not sure how you have gotten to that point. Therefore, I think everyone that comes to Raak leaves with an essential truth that they know about themselves,” she says.

Viljoen started her journey in the arts at a young age with interests in poetry, music and dance.

“My poor parents – I think I must have made them sit through endless hours of impromptu performances. So, it’s always been such an intrinsic part of how I expressed myself within the world, that studying Theatre and Performance seemed like a very organic next step. It never felt like I had any other choice,” she says.

While the arts may be a dying medium for some, Viljoen believes in the power it holds.

“I am so fortunate to find myself in the world of the arts and every day I am reminded of the power of theatre and performance. There is such an immense amount of power in the stories we tell, in who we put on stage and in how we imagine ourselves on stage. If I could leave anyone with some words of advice, it would be to never underestimate the value of your own voice and the telling of your own story.

“What really excites me about theatre is the endless amounts of forms it holds within itself; the power it has to serve as metaphor and as symbol; the fact that one object can be opened up to a multitude of meanings and interpretations. What it really means is that we, as theatre-makers, have an endless amount of possibilities within our reach and that’s exciting,” she says.

Viljoen says she will certainly continue writing plays and hopes to put together many more productions.

“There are quite a few projects that are waiting to be performed and written. I don’t think I have a favourite genre, per se, but I do enjoy using myths and folklore within my writing. There is something quite wonderful about being able to write your own interpretation or re-imagine a story that has existed for many years before.”

V Raak will be performed at the Baxter Masambe Theatre from Thursday 6 to Saturday 8 December. Tickets cost R70 and R50 for students and pensioners. Tickets are available through webtickets.co.za.

A new young play-write is almost set to put on her first production at the Baxter, when her play Raak takes to the stage in December.

Fresh from graduating in Theatre and Performance at the University of Cape Town, Kanya Viljoen’s Afrikaans play is the story of a single evening that unfolds into a lifetime shared between a husband and a wife, their beginning and the beginning of their end.

Viljoen (24), who grew up in Somerset West, says the play was inspired by a mixture of fact and fiction in her own life.

“I grew up in a relatively small Afrikaans community and it lingered with me how dreams and expectations shift as we grow older, sometimes due to the realities in which we find ourselves. Relationships change and I kept on wondering if it was truly for the better. The fictional element comes from my love of reading. N.P. van Wyk Louw’s Raka forms such a crucial part of the Afrikaans literary canon and I was interested in re-imagining and rewriting this literature. Thus, it forms quite an intricate part of the script,” she says.

The play can resonate with everyone, says Viljoen.

“I think what has made this play so relatable to such a wide audience is the fact that it is based on a very simple truth – that of human relationships. We all can relate to falling in love with the matric boy at school, and then catching yourself within a relationship, not sure how you have gotten to that point. Therefore, I think everyone that comes to Raak leaves with an essential truth that they know about themselves,” she says.

Viljoen started her journey in the arts at a young age with interests in poetry, music and dance.

“My poor parents – I think I must have made them sit through endless hours of impromptu performances. So, it’s always been such an intrinsic part of how I expressed myself within the world, that studying Theatre and Performance seemed like a very organic next step. It never felt like I had any other choice,” she says.

While the arts may be a dying medium for some, Viljoen believes in the power it holds.

“I am so fortunate to find myself in the world of the arts and every day I am reminded of the power of theatre and performance. There is such an immense amount of power in the stories we tell, in who we put on stage and in how we imagine ourselves on stage. If I could leave anyone with some words of advice, it would be to never underestimate the value of your own voice and the telling of your own story.

“What really excites me about theatre is the endless amounts of forms it holds within itself; the power it has to serve as metaphor and as symbol; the fact that one object can be opened up to a multitude of meanings and interpretations. What it really means is that we, as theatre-makers, have an endless amount of possibilities within our reach and that’s exciting,” she says.

Viljoen says she will certainly continue writing plays and hopes to put together many more productions.

“There are quite a few projects that are waiting to be performed and written. I don’t think I have a favourite genre, per se, but I do enjoy using myths and folklore within my writing. There is something quite wonderful about being able to write your own interpretation or re-imagine a story that has existed for many years before.”

V Raak will be performed at the Baxter Masambe Theatre from Thursday 6 to Saturday 8 December. Tickets cost R70 and R50 for students and pensioners. Tickets are available through webtickets.co.za.

A new young play-write is almost set to put on her first production at the Baxter, when her play Raak takes to the stage in December.

Fresh from graduating in Theatre and Performance at the University of Cape Town, Kanya Viljoen’s Afrikaans play is the story of a single evening that unfolds into a lifetime shared between a husband and a wife, their beginning and the beginning of their end.

Viljoen (24), who grew up in Somerset West, says the play was inspired by a mixture of fact and fiction in her own life.

“I grew up in a relatively small Afrikaans community and it lingered with me how dreams and expectations shift as we grow older, sometimes due to the realities in which we find ourselves. Relationships change and I kept on wondering if it was truly for the better. The fictional element comes from my love of reading. N.P. van Wyk Louw’s Raka forms such a crucial part of the Afrikaans literary canon and I was interested in re-imagining and rewriting this literature. Thus, it forms quite an intricate part of the script,” she says.

The play can resonate with everyone, says Viljoen.

“I think what has made this play so relatable to such a wide audience is the fact that it is based on a very simple truth – that of human relationships. We all can relate to falling in love with the matric boy at school, and then catching yourself within a relationship, not sure how you have gotten to that point. Therefore, I think everyone that comes to Raak leaves with an essential truth that they know about themselves,” she says.

Viljoen started her journey in the arts at a young age with interests in poetry, music and dance.

“My poor parents – I think I must have made them sit through endless hours of impromptu performances. So, it’s always been such an intrinsic part of how I expressed myself within the world, that studying Theatre and Performance seemed like a very organic next step. It never felt like I had any other choice,” she says.

While the arts may be a dying medium for some, Viljoen believes in the power it holds.

“I am so fortunate to find myself in the world of the arts and every day I am reminded of the power of theatre and performance. There is such an immense amount of power in the stories we tell, in who we put on stage and in how we imagine ourselves on stage. If I could leave anyone with some words of advice, it would be to never underestimate the value of your own voice and the telling of your own story.

“What really excites me about theatre is the endless amounts of forms it holds within itself; the power it has to serve as metaphor and as symbol; the fact that one object can be opened up to a multitude of meanings and interpretations. What it really means is that we, as theatre-makers, have an endless amount of possibilities within our reach and that’s exciting,” she says.

Viljoen says she will certainly continue writing plays and hopes to put together many more productions.

“There are quite a few projects that are waiting to be performed and written. I don’t think I have a favourite genre, per se, but I do enjoy using myths and folklore within my writing. There is something quite wonderful about being able to write your own interpretation or re-imagine a story that has existed for many years before.”

V Raak will be performed at the Baxter Masambe Theatre from Thursday 6 to Saturday 8 December. Tickets cost R70 and R50 for students and pensioners. Tickets are available through webtickets.co.za.

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