UCT student heads to Joburg

2019-04-30 06:01
Anthony Whitaker is this year’s winner from the University of Cape Town in the Corobrik regional architectural student awards. He will represent UCT at the national finals in Johannesburg

Anthony Whitaker is this year’s winner from the University of Cape Town in the Corobrik regional architectural student awards. He will represent UCT at the national finals in Johannesburg

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On Sunday 5 May, Anthony Whitaker, who has already won the UCT regional event, heads off to Johannesburg to participate in the prestigious 32nd Corobrik Architectural Student of the Year Award. The winner will be announced at an event on Tuesday 7 May.

Whitaker, from Gardens has titled his thesis ‘Builders, Agriculturalists, and Interpreters — architecture by Narration’. The project is based on fieldwork research and observations of social practices in Gugulethu, Cape Town. Three architectural approaches make up the project – a building system (Part 1: Proto-town), that system as building (Part 2: Proto-type), and that building system as an urban model (Part 3: Proto-town).

The first considers buildability and materiality. A proposal for a replicable building system found and resolved in the practice of autonomous building, characteristic of under-resourced and marginalized neighbourhoods in South African cities.

It is a building system that aims to simplify the planning and building process of construction, enabling non-experts to build and influence the design process. Using basic products of industry and skills that are commonly known and understood, it responds to the people who build them and can be altered.

The Proto-Type – a small timber structure hoisted to a 6m ISO shipping container will give space to store equipment.

The adjacent meeting space opens towards the crops and will be used for recreational activities and educational workshops. The third begins to project new possibilities informed by the previous two parts.

The defunct King David Country Club, north of Gugulethu, is appropriated and imagined as a Proto-Town. The communal hall is the largest and most prominent structure of all in the Proto-town.

Its construction involves the most elaborate technologies of all structures. The hall is conceived as being built first. It will accommodate a range of programmes in a sequence of phases.

Once construction of the town progresses the demand for the workshops will be reduced to the necessary maintenance workshops.

On Sunday 5 May, Anthony Whitaker, who has already won the UCT regional event, heads off to Johannesburg to participate in the prestigious 32nd Corobrik Architectural Student of the Year Award. The winner will be announced at an event on Tuesday 7 May.

Whitaker, from Gardens has titled his thesis ‘Builders, Agriculturalists, and Interpreters — architecture by Narration’. The project is based on fieldwork research and observations of social practices in Gugulethu, Cape Town.

Three architectural approaches make up the project – a building system (Part 1: Proto-town), that system as building (Part 2: Proto-type), and that building system as an urban model (Part 3: Proto-town).The first considers buildability and materiality. A proposal for a replicable building system found and resolved in the practice of autonomous building, characteristic of under-resourced and marginalized neighbourhoods in South African cities.

It is a building system that aims to simplify the planning and building process of construction, enabling non-experts to build and influence the design process. Using basic products of industry and skills that are commonly known and understood, it responds to the people who build them and can be altered.

The Proto-Type – a small timber structure hoisted to a 6m ISO shipping container will give space to store equipment.

The adjacent meeting space opens towards the crops and will be used for recreational activities and educational workshops. The third begins to project new possibilities informed by the previous two parts.

The defunct King David Country Club, north of Gugulethu, is appropriated and imagined as a Proto-Town. The communal hall is the largest and most prominent structure of all in the Proto-town.

Its construction involves the most elaborate technologies of all structures. The hall is conceived as being built first. It will accommodate a range of programmes in a sequence of phases.

Once construction of the town progresses the demand for the workshops will be reduced to the necessary maintenance workshops.

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