Understanding spatial development

2020-02-11 06:00

The Municipal Spatial Development Framework (MSDF – adopted in April 2018) pursues a new spatial form for Cape Town with higher densities and public-led investment in an “Urban Inner Core”.

The focus is on inward growth and transit-oriented development (TOD), with greater protection of the city’s natural and agricultural assets, the City’s Mayco member for spatial planning and environment, Marian Nieuwoudt, explains.

On the TOD side, Observatory, Rondebosch and Wynberg – served by emerging and existing public transport networks – play an important role in the spatial vision. Nieuwoudt says ideally new developments should be strategically located around public transport where residents will have easy access to either rail, MyCiTi trunk routes, or minibus-taxis, and bus routes.

“It must be inclusive of all income groups in relation to economic and work opportunities. Spatial integration, and shorter travel distances and times for all residents will ultimately reduce the cost of access for transport users (in terms of travelling time and money spent on transport).”

The revised MSDF manages urban growth and development through four primary areas:

. An Urban Inner Core where public investment is prioritised, and where private sector investment is incentivised. Broadly speaking, the Urban Inner Core includes Cape Town’s existing industrial and commercial areas such as the areas adjacent to the N1, N2, N7, and M5 highways; along the R27 to the north and Main Road to the south; along major arterials linking the metro-south east with Bellville and Kuils River; and the Cape Town International Airport.

. Incremental growth and consolidation areas where the City will keep on servicing existing developments and where new development will be subject to infrastructure capacity.

. Discouraged growth areas where the City will not make any investments, which include protected areas where it has natural and agricultural assets; areas that do not contribute to spatial transformation, inward growth, or transit-oriented development.

. Critical natural asset areas that contribute significantly to Cape Town’s future resilience and/or are protected by legislation. These include protected natural environments and conservation areas.

“Simply put, the MSDF identifies areas suitable for urban development and catalytic interventions to achieve spatial transformation; areas where the impact of development must be managed; and areas not suited for urban development.

“It guides decision-making on the nature, form, scale and location of urban development, land use, the maintenance and development of infrastructure, and the protection of environmental resources,” Nieuwoudt says.

The City is in the process of updating the Spatial Development Frameworks for the eight planning districts (Table Bay, Blaauwberg, Southern District, Northern District, Cape Flats, Helderberg, Tygerberg and Mitchell’s Plain) in order to align these with the MSDF policy objectives.

Niewoudt says it will be the role of the district plans to guide future spatial development at a district and local area level over a 10-year time horizon.

“Accordingly, the SDFs will be required to spatially target such infill development opportunities inclusive of guidelines on the most appropriate form, land use mix and scale to effect the City’s approach to achieving TOD,” she concludes.

The Municipal Spatial Development Framework (MSDF – adopted in April 2018) pursues a new spatial form for Cape Town with higher densities and public-led investment in an “Urban Inner Core”.

The focus is on inward growth and transit-oriented development (TOD), with greater protection of the city’s natural and agricultural assets, the City’s Mayco member for spatial planning and environment, Marian Nieuwoudt, explains.

On the TOD side, Observatory, Rondebosch and Wynberg – served by emerging and existing public transport networks – play an important role in the spatial vision.

Nieuwoudt says ideally new developments should be strategically located around public transport where residents will have easy access to either rail, MyCiTi trunk routes, or minibus-taxis, and bus routes.

“It must be inclusive of all income groups in relation to economic and work opportunities. Spatial integration, and shorter travel distances and times for all residents will ultimately reduce the cost of access for transport users (in terms of travelling time and money spent on transport).”

The revised MSDF manages urban growth and development through four primary areas:

. An Urban Inner Core where public investment is prioritised, and where private sector investment is incentivised. Broadly speaking, the Urban Inner Core includes Cape Town’s existing industrial and commercial areas such as the areas adjacent to the N1, N2, N7, and M5 highways; along the R27 to the north and Main Road to the south; along major arterials linking the metro-south east with Bellville and Kuils River; and the Cape Town International Airport.

. Incremental growth and consolidation areas where the City will keep on servicing existing developments and where new development will be subject to infrastructure capacity.

. Discouraged growth areas where the City will not make any investments, which include protected areas where it has natural and agricultural assets; areas that do not contribute to spatial transformation, inward growth, or transit-oriented development.

. Critical natural asset areas that contribute significantly to Cape Town’s future resilience and/or are protected by legislation. These include protected natural environments and conservation areas.

“Simply put, the MSDF identifies areas suitable for urban development and catalytic interventions to achieve spatial transformation; areas where the impact of development must be managed; and areas not suited for urban development.

“It guides decision-making on the nature, form, scale and location of urban development, land use, the maintenance and development of infrastructure, and the protection of environmental resources,” Nieuwoudt says.

The City is in the process of updating the Spatial Development Frameworks for the eight planning districts (Table Bay, Blaauwberg, Southern District, Northern District, Cape Flats, Helderberg, Tygerberg and Mitchell’s Plain) in order to align these with the MSDF policy objectives.

Niewoudt says it will be the role of the district plans to guide future spatial development at a district and local area level over a 10-year time horizon.

“Accordingly, the SDFs will be required to spatially target such infill development opportunities inclusive of guidelines on the most appropriate form, land use mix and scale to effect the City’s approach to achieving TOD,” she concludes.

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