‘We want peace’

2018-06-26 06:00
Holy Cross High School marched for peace in Maitland on Thursday 21 June.PHOTO: luvuyo mjekula

Holy Cross High School marched for peace in Maitland on Thursday 21 June.PHOTO: luvuyo mjekula

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Staff and learners of Holy Cross High School went on a march on Thursday 21 June calling for peace in their community and the world.

Brandishing placards, the 100 schoolgirls, their teachers and other staff members circled the school’s premises, chanting “We want peace!”

Holy Cross is a Catholic school based in Maitland, with 350 girl learners from areas including Maitland, Kensington, Factreton, Khayelitsa, Langa, Gugulethu and Delft.

Principal Michael Fouché says the march was inspired by the school’s various religious committees and the peace movement. “It fits perfectly with what we have as a Catholic school, as a Catholic ethos. It’s a way for us to live out this so the community participates, so that the community sees that we are here to be a haven, a safe place and a joyful place, that’s important for us.”

Head girl, Anakho Fihlani adds: “Spreading peace is very important in our society and in our generation to groom each other to become better people. By doing the peace walk, we are giving citizens in this community the strength to end these drug abuses and the fights that are going on.”

Her deputy, Paula Algeria Joao, says that through the march, the learners called for an end to xenophobia. “Our walk today is to make the Maitland community realise that Holy Cross wants peace, we are tired of all these (bad) things, and we are trying to end them with peace,” she says.

A number of activities dealing with the importance of peace and values took place at the school in recent weeks. On Wednesday, the learners spent the hours before the march singing peace songs. Workshops were alsoheld and information about peace challenges in South Sudan, South Korea and the Middle East, as well as refugees in South Africa, was imparted. V Contined in page 2.

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