‘Work with cops, CPF’

2018-06-05 06:00
Colonel Shawn van Wyk, the station commander for Lansdowne Police Station, with Rafique Foflonker from Lansdowne CPF and Sergeant Nkululeko Mnyaka. PHOTO: aishah cassiem

Colonel Shawn van Wyk, the station commander for Lansdowne Police Station, with Rafique Foflonker from Lansdowne CPF and Sergeant Nkululeko Mnyaka. PHOTO: aishah cassiem

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Lansdowne Police Station and the Lansdowne Community Policing Forum (CPF) are calling on residents to work hand in hand with them for better services in the area. The local station is embarking on several campaigns within the community to eliminate challenges facing residents daily.

Station commander Colonel Shawn van Wyk says community volunteers are needed at the station to assist police with various tasks daily.

“Human resources and personnel management are a big challenge for the station. We want to encourage the community to get involved with us, specifically with the neighbourhood watches in our area. This will be a big support to the station,” says Van Wyk.

“We also call on volunteers to assist us with administrative tasks, like doing certifications and so forth. We need commissioners of oaths to volunteer their services at the station with small administrative [tasks] that police do as well.”

The Victim Empowerment Programme (VEP) at the station currently has only five volunteers and is in dire need of assistance to accommodate more victims daily. The programme aims to support victims and survivors of crime and violence, as well as their families, to help them deal with the impact of such incidents.

“We need volunteers from the community who are of good character and who can handle such issues. The VEP deals with all kinds of victimisation, especially in terms of violence against women and children, domestic violence, victims of sexual assault, human trafficking and xenophobia, among others.

“They don’t need any academic qualification to be a volunteer and to assist us on the programme. We also give them the necessary training for the programme in return for assisting the police. All applicants undergo background checks in this regard. The community also needs to know that we have these services available for them here, free of charge.”

Van Wyk urges parents to teach children the importance of running to the police in the event of an emergency.

“We are also asking the community to make children aware that the police are their friends and not their enemy. Parents need to stop scaring kids with the police. In a case of an emergency where a child goes missing, they will run away from the police instead of coming to us. This is a huge issue,” he concludes.

V Continued on page 5.

Rafique Foflonker, chairperson of Lansdowne CPF also urges residents to avoid forwarding fake news, which causes panic within the community.

“We are requesting people who forward messages on social media using WhatsApp, Facebook, email and so forth to clarify the source, date, name and type before distributing it. This can be done via the ‘3-S’ tag procedure,” explains Foflonker.

“This might reduce the misinformation and fake news that goes viral in social media and causes unnecessary panic and fear in our communities. It may also make it easier to source the original message to establish the facts quickly and independently.”

He says this does not prevent intentional tampering with the message, but it might reduce the negative impact from blindly forwarding inaccurate or outdated messages to others.

The ‘3-S’ tag includes the source date, source name and source type.

Posters are currently being distributed across the community and are available on the station’s Facebook page or at the station itself, with the aim of making residents aware of various programmes available to them.

Sergeant Nkululeko Mnyaka, who deals with the community upfront, can be contacted with any enquiries.

V For more information, call Lansdowne Police Station on 021 700 9045.

Lansdowne Police Station and the Lansdowne Community Policing Forum (CPF) are calling on residents to work hand in hand with them for better services in the area. The local station is embarking on several campaigns within the community to eliminate challenges facing residents daily.

Station commander Colonel Shawn van Wyk says community volunteers are needed at the station to assist police with various tasks daily.

“Human resources and personnel management are a big challenge for the station. We want to encourage the community to get involved with us, specifically with the neighbourhood watches in our area. This will be a big support to the station,” says Van Wyk.

“We also call on volunteers to assist us with administrative tasks, like doing certifications and so forth. We need commissioners of oaths to volunteer their services at the station with small administrative [tasks] that police do as well.”

The Victim Empowerment Programme (VEP) at the station currently has only five volunteers and is in dire need of assistance to accommodate more victims daily. The programme aims to support victims and survivors of crime and violence, as well as their families, to help them deal with the impact of such incidents.

“We need volunteers from the community who are of good character and who can handle such issues. The VEP deals with all kinds of victimisation, especially in terms of violence against women and children, domestic violence, victims of sexual abuse, human trafficking and xenophobia, among others.

“They don’t need any academic qualification to be a volunteer and to assist us on the programme. We also give them the necessary training for the programme in return for assisting the police. All applicants undergo background checks in this regard. The community also needs to know that we have these services available for them here, free of charge.”

Van Wyk urges parents to teach children the importance of running to the police in the event of an emergency.

“We are also asking the community to make children aware that the police are their friends and not their enemy. Parents need to stop scaring kids with the police. In a case of an emergency where a child goes missing, they will run away from the police instead of coming to us. This is a huge issue,” he says.

V Continued on page 5.

Lansdowne Police Station and the Lansdowne Community Policing Forum (CPF) are calling on residents to work hand in hand with them for better services in the area. The local station is embarking on several campaigns within the community to eliminate challenges facing residents daily.

Station commander Colonel Shawn van Wyk says community volunteers are needed at the station to assist police with various tasks daily.

“Human resources and personnel management are a big challenge for the station. We want to encourage the community to get involved with us, specifically with the neighbourhood watches in our area. This will be a big support to the station,” says Van Wyk.

“We also call on volunteers to assist us with administrative tasks, like doing certifications and so forth. We need commissioners of oaths to volunteer their services at the station with small administrative [tasks] that police do as well.”

The Victim Empowerment Programme (VEP) at the station currently has only five volunteers and is in dire need of assistance to accommodate more victims daily. The programme aims to support victims and survivors of crime and violence, as well as their families, to help them deal with the impact of such incidents.

“We need volunteers from the community who are of good character and who can handle such issues. The VEP deals with all kinds of victimisation, especially in terms of violence against women and children, domestic violence, victims of sexual abuse, human trafficking and xenophobia, among others.

“They don’t need any academic qualification to be a volunteer and to assist us on the programme. We also give them the necessary training for the programme in return for assisting the police. All applicants undergo background checks in this regard. The community also needs to know that we have these services available for them here, free of charge.”

Van Wyk urges parents to teach children the importance of running to the police in the event of an emergency.

“We are also asking the community to make children aware that the police are their friends and not their enemy. Parents need to stop scaring kids with the police. In a case of an emergency where a child goes missing, they will run away from the police instead of coming to us. This is a huge issue,” he says.

V Continued on page 5.

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