An inconvenient truth

2017-01-26 06:03

AMONG the various most serious diseases in the world today, there is one we hear about almost daily in the media. Here, in our retirement village, we frequently learn of residents who have been diagnosed with cancer, are very sick from it and its treatment, or who have died because of it.

For those reasons and having in my possession a copy of an article published in a South African newspaper in 1999, I wish to share the following information. Anyone who knows the life story of the American medical scientist of the 1930’s, Royal Raymond Rife, will understand why, over the past 80 years, not much progress towards a cure for cancer has been made.

In 1931 some of America’s most respected professionals honoured Royal Raymond Rife with a banquet billed as “The end of all diseases”. Rife was a brilliant scientist who developed technology still used today in the fields of optics, electronics, radio-chemistry, ballistics and aviation.

His greatest contribution was in bio-electric medicine, where he developed a technique not only to identify viruses­ and bacteria but to destroy them by tuning into their specific vibrational­ frequency.

He called this frequency “the mortal oscillatory rate”, the same principle used with an intense musical note to shatter a wine glass.

In summary, he eventually treated and cured twelve patients with various types of cancer.

However, although Rife’s medical research was documented in film and stop-motion photographs, he (as well as various doctors and professors associated with him) was silenced by the medica and/or pharmaceutical cartel of his day.

Fifty years of research was destroyed and doctors using Rife technology were discredited.

Some of Rife’s colleagues were victims of various “accidents” and Rife’s laboratory was destroyed by fire. He finished his life a broken man, in a retirement home, where he died in 1971.

Rife was born in 1888, received 14 major awards and honours and was given an honorary doctorate by the University of Heidelburg, U.S.

After constructing the incredibly complex universal microscope, Rife became the first person to see a live virus and to identify the spectroscopic signature of certain microbes.

An inconvenient truth is that there is money in treating cancer but there is no money in finding a cure.

J.J. Rousseau

Margate

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