News24

Burglary the most feared crime - survey

2012-09-27 14:43

Pretoria - Most South Africans fear falling victim to housebreaking, a crime survey has revealed.

Releasing the results of 2012 Victims of Crime Survey (VOCS) in Pretoria on Thursday, Statistics SA deputy director general Kefiloe Masiteng said about 59.3% of households perceived burglary as the most common crime.

"We were asking families what are the most feared types of crimes.

"Housebreaking and robbery came out to be the crimes that people are worried about," said Masiteng.

Housebreaking is classified as unlawful and intentional entry into a building intending to commit crime while nobody is in the dwelling.

The study found that burglary was the most common crime, and had been experienced at least once by 5.4% of the households reviewed, followed by home robbery at 1.5% and theft of livestock at 1.3%.

Theft of personal property, at 2.5%, was the most common crime experienced by selected individuals aged 16 years and older, followed by assault at 1.3%.

The survey found that most housebreakings occurred at night, at 27.5%, with 19.8% in the afternoons.

The period under review was January to December 2011.

Bribes

In its overview, researchers noted that it was widely believed that people were being asked for bribes by government officials for services they were legally required to perform.

Gauteng had the highest rate of households asked for bribes by government officials, at 58.4%. Next was the Free State at 53.7% and Mpumalanga at 53.6%.

The number of households satisfied with the performance of the police declined on the previous year.

"We had a percentage of 65 in 2010, but we had a 62% satisfaction with regards to satisfaction with the police performance [in 2011]," said Masiteng.

The perception about police performance was influenced by factors including the time taken to respond to crime scenes, visible policing and the recovery of stolen goods by the police.

The survey focused on people's perceptions and experiences of crime, and their views regarding their access to the police and the justice system.

The target population of the survey was private households in all nine provinces.

It did not cover other living quarters like student hostels, old age homes, hospitals, prisons and military barracks.

The survey sought to provide information about the dynamics of crime in the country from the perception of households and victims of crime.

Comments
  • margo.vorster - 2012-09-27 15:06

    Surprise!! These skelms can traumatize people for life, and if u defend yourself, You get charged - more genius ideas from our gov!

      Donne.3 - 2012-09-27 15:34

      Davy.crockett - have you ever been through an armed robbery in your house? For someone that has - why the hell should I help anybody that put me and 35 other people (including children) through that???

      scebberish.umfazi - 2012-09-27 15:34

      "Housebreaking is classified as unlawful and intentional entry into a building intending to commit crime while nobody is in the dwelling." So what is the classification for this if you ARE home??? Unwelcome visitors and therefore ok?

      sibu.malusi - 2012-09-27 15:53

      Yes Davy, circumstances can, to a degree, be blamed for people resorting to crime. But interviews with criminals in jails have shown that the majority of them do crime because of greed or to get money for drugs. Precious little criminals do crime because they're hungry. Besides, you as a person takes a conscious decision to do crime or not. If you choose crime, you are effectively saying 'I don't respect the laws of this country or the rights of my fellow South Africans'. Therefore, someone like that should be dealt with harshly. Bugger their so-called 'rights' - they have no rights as they chose to disobey the law. I think it's about time that people are taught how to take responsibility for their actions and stop playing the 'I'm a victim too' card.

      jbrandct - 2012-09-27 16:05

      davy.crockett Crime is one thing but what about violent crime ? Why do innocent people have to get tortured, raped and killed when the thieves already have what they came for ? Also, why do many people in other countries who live in extreme poverty like say India, Korea and such not commit crimes. Most of these people don't even receive welfare like ours do. Why do extremely poor white people in this country like the ones who live in squatter houses not commit crime ? No, I do not believe for one second that criminals are victims.

      arie.vdplaats.3 - 2012-10-19 09:22

      Margo.vorster you live on a different planet. If you are in your own home and you defend yourself with maximum force you will be charged but it is inevetable that you will not be found guilty. It is the law of the land that all unnatural deaths must be investigated, even if you caused it inside your own home defending yourself. So explain your actions defending yourself inside your home and you will be acquitted. Not only does need this happen inside of your home, you are at all times at liberty to defend yourself against any form of crime, anywhere, but you WILL required to be able to explain your action during the following enquiry

  • sharon.erwin.96 - 2012-09-27 15:12

    I understand that burglary is the most common crime, but the most feared? I suppose if the victims are at home when the burglars show up, and they are tied up, raped, burnt with an iron or boiling water and then killed - that is what I fear most.

      eric.shinn.90 - 2012-09-27 16:05

      Yeah it's poorly conducted research. There faults in this method, I'm not even gonna get started.

      scebberish.umfazi - 2012-09-27 16:10

      Surveys are nothing more than manipulative questions designed to induce the results that the surveyor wants, invoked by the questions posed in the survey. This must have been a Government initiative along with the DS crime stats. Otherwise there would a part about violent attacks when you ARE home.

  • bevan.carpenter.1 - 2012-09-27 15:15

    yeah, its because there is an interaction with the perpetrator, and given our admittedly violent crimes, murder and maiming usually follow

  • tshepo.maganedisa - 2012-09-27 15:16

    I also fear the same too, i have recently bought a new house and i am still scared of fully occupying my place until im on leave so i can monitor everything first-i was hoping this sector policing might work but i am not sure if its yielding positive results as yet

      scebberish.umfazi - 2012-09-27 15:56

      You have worked hard for your dream now you must live in fear and terror for the rest of your life just because you are an honest hard working person who has bettered themselves and earned your right to happiness. Here they call this freedom.

  • shirley.steenkamp - 2012-09-27 15:17

    Welcome to anc wonderland! You get murdered for the fun of it! The only country in the world,where the rights of the criinal is more important than that of the victims!!!!!

      arie.vdplaats.3 - 2012-10-19 09:28

      The rights of the criminal are NEVER more important than that of the victims. The fact of the matter is that the criminal and you have exactly the same rights. Whereas you may not kill a criminal similarly he does not have the RIGHT to kill you, but because he IS a criminal he DOES NOT CARE for the law and associated human rights

  • monde.sibisi - 2012-09-27 15:21

    That's very true, but you step into my house un invited I will shoot you dead. My daughter won't be harmed by some evil bastard trying to ruin our lives

  • marc.hugo.75 - 2012-09-27 15:32

    Tens of thousands crimes every month are no longer even reported to the police. What would be the point? Insurance claims? They are worse than useless. The only two categories of crime in which they would ever make an effort is if (a) the crime is highly publicised on electronic media (print media you can forget) and/or (b) the crime is a white on non-white incident (eg the famous Muslim beard incident). Otherwise, forget it.

  • talana.malherbe - 2012-09-27 15:39

    I can believe this, happened to my neighbours and you never get over it! I will shoot, not ask questions and not phone the police!

      marc.hugo.75 - 2012-09-27 15:49

      Quite right Talana!!

      bevan.carpenter.1 - 2012-09-27 15:52

      I agree, discard the evidence, leave the body next to the highway, the bigger picture is so sad that we as the public are prepared to even consider such actions because we have no faith in the SAPpies

  • Eterni80 - 2012-09-27 15:47

    the reason we fear burglaries is that this crime isn't about stealing, it's about violent assault, rape and the absolute destruction of the victims lives. Like the government, criminals are f'ing cowards. To lazy to work, or get a job, they just want what other people have and will kill anyone who gets in their way. A friend of mine was involved in a hijacking yesterday, where he had to beg the masked hijackers to just let the family get out of the car, they put a gun to the back of his head and almost killed him for his efforts. He is worth a billion Zumas/Malemas.

  • ingrid.oberholzer - 2012-09-27 15:49

    We have so many foreigners in our country that have skipped the boarder with no documents so we are easy targets. My friend was attacked on a small holding in Magalies by 4 drunk men who raped his wife and beat him badly, they were deported back to Zim by our competent police so the case was dropped. This couple have since divorced because of this brutal incident.

  • charlesmakgale.radingoane - 2012-09-27 16:03

    Where i am living there is no crime at all. i can go to town without locking the house. We dont live in fear.

      scebberish.umfazi - 2012-09-27 16:49

      Yes, New Zealand certainly does have its good points!

      charlesmakgale.radingoane - 2012-09-28 04:39

      ppl think all regions of south africa is filled with crime.

  • noreenhanora.hughes - 2012-09-27 16:05

    Don't know where you get your information.I don't know anyone one has not being robbed ,had their car stolen,or their dog poisoned .at best being asked for a bribe by those who are supposed to protect us.then after a robbery you find out if you are insured with dial direct ,they have also robbed as all the money you have given them for years,not claimed ,you will get a very bad written text to say you own nothing contact the insurance ombutsman.then after taking the time to send the information you Never get a reply.surprise surprise your insurance company fixs potholes ( already paid by your taxes) so they have got a foot in the door with politics and therefore can screw you over too.

  • scebberish.umfazi - 2012-09-27 16:30

    How much you want to bet there were no questions about violent intrusions while you ARE home!

  • trevor.roberts.148 - 2012-09-27 17:11

    I was held up at gunpoint four times.The last time at my home in Roodepoort. I now live in Scotland.

  • ken.koen - 2012-09-28 09:28

    Crime is now so bad in this country, that its placing the lives of civilised law abiding citizens in grave danger on an almost genocidal scale, and considering the governments inability, or unwillingness, or both, to do anything about it, we should have United Nations intervention. Its time that United Nations forces were deployed to protect us threatened and beleagured citizens.

  • edward.d.beesley - 2012-09-28 10:04

    I always see the findings of some survey or other - but have yet to be asked to be a respondent in a single one! As such, I don't believe them. I think they're just thumb-suck stories, published to coverup the real issues. I can't believe "murder" didn't feature as the crime most feared - or isn't that a crime in South Africa anymore?

  • gwyneth.s.parry - 2012-09-28 12:22

    My house was burgled a year ago during broad day light!!! There were people/neighbours home but.....believe me no one....no bothered to come and see what was going on. I work my head off for my home and the little I have!!!!!! Why don't there wonderful criminals go and steal by the amazing, idiotic Julius Malema who encourages his supporters not to work and then they will end up stealing ( from others)?

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