Terrorism-accused Thulsie twins head back to court after long delay

2019-01-31 15:27
The Thulsie twins.

The Thulsie twins.

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Terrorism-accused twins Brandon-Lee and Tony-Lee Thulsie were set to return to the Gauteng High Court in Johannesburg on Thursday, nearly three years after they were first arrested, EWN and SABC reported. 

The twin brothers are accused of planning to set off explosives in South Africa.

The men face three counts of contravening the Protection of Constitutional Democracy Against Terrorist and Related Activities Act, after being arrested in the Johannesburg suburbs of Newclare and Azaadville on July 9, 2016, News24 reported

They were allegedly linked to the self-proclaimed Islamic State group and are suspected of planning strikes against a US embassy and institutions associated with Judaism in South Africa.

Hawks spokesperson Brigadier Hangwani Mulaudzi previously told News24 that the arrests followed prolonged investigations into possible terrorism-related activities in the Johannesburg area. 

News24 previously reported that, in an indictment submitted to the court in April 2017, the State listed 12 activities the twins were allegedly instructed to carry out, using firearms, explosives and possibly poison.

It stated that, "in August 2015, [Tony-Lee] became a participant in a series of Telegram chats with Abu Fidaa, an ISIS network, and other persons whose real identities are unknown to the State, during which he was instructed to:

• Attack the best targets involving "US/Brit/French interest in SA";

• Kill cartoonist Zapiro, who drew the Messenger of Allah cartoon;

• Kill Jews who fight in Israel and return to South Africa;

• Kill affluent Jews; and

• Kill a gay imam, "as yet unidentified".

Other targets included King David High School in Linksfield, Johannesburg, the UK High Commission, the US and Russian embassies, the first secretary to the French mission, Jewish investment banker Roy Topol, the SA Zionist Federation, state-owned arms manufacturer Denel, Jewish community events and foreign interests at airports.

It is alleged that Tony-Lee discussed terrorist plans with an undercover US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agent between May and June 2016. He believed the agent was an ISIS operative, based in the US. He allegedly sought advice about making bombs and asked for funding. He is accused of soliciting support for ISIS, using his personal Facebook page.

Brandon-Lee allegedly acquired the Mujahideen Poisons Handbook by Abdel-Aziz, and the manual How to Survive in the West: A Mujahid Guide, which teaches readers how to "live a double life" and "how to keep your secret life private".

Their case has been postponed for several reasons since it commenced. 

The brothers have remained in custody since their arrest.

Read more on:    brandon-lee thulsie  |  tony-lee thulsie  |  johannesburg  |  security  |  courts
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