News24

Forced evictions rise in China: Amnesty

2012-10-11 09:57

Beijing - Forced evictions in China, a major source of social discontent, have risen significantly in the past two years as local officials and property developers colluded to seize and sell land to pay off government debt, Amnesty International said on Thursday.

Property disputes in a country where the government legally owns all land are often violent and have led to growing social instability, one of the challenges facing a new generation of Chinese leaders, led by Vice-President Xi Jinping.

Amnesty's 85-page report, compiled between February 2010 and January 2012, said violence exerted on residents resulted in deaths, imprisonment and self-immolations.

"Potentially, millions of people in the country are at risk of these illegal forced evictions and indeed protests about forced evictions are the single biggest issue of populist discontent in the country," Nicola Duckworth, Amnesty's senior director of research, said.

"So it's a huge issue, it's been going on for many, many years, we feel it's rising in scale now and it's really time to put an end to it."

Land sales by local governments soared as officials scrambled to raise the capital needed to hit ambitious targets for infrastructure building set by Beijing in a $637bn economic stimulus plan, launched late in 2008 as the global financial crisis raged.

New rules

Frenzied speculative activity inflated a real estate bubble that resulted in local governments racking up debts of $1.7 trillion by the end of 2010 as they also borrowed to build, compelling them to sell yet more land to pay back loans.

Beijing launched a campaign in 2010 to restrict speculative sales and development. There is some evidence of those restrictions working as total land area bought by developers fell 16.2% in the first eight months of 2012 versus 2011, with revenues down 7.6% in the same period.

China also unveiled new rules in 2011 to outlaw violent forced eviction, promising fair prices to the dispossessed.

Amnesty said it welcomed the regulations, but added they fell short of the standards it would like to see and applied only to urban residents.

Of 40 forced evictions Amnesty examined, nine culminated in the deaths of people protesting or resisting eviction.

A 70-year-old woman, Wang Cuiyan, was buried alive by an excavator in March 2010 when a crew of about 30 to 40 workers came to demolish her house in Wuhan city in central Hubei province, the report said.

Rights groups have repeatedly criticised the government for not doing enough to prevent forced evictions, especially when people are made to make way for large-scale events like the 2008 Beijing Olympics and the Shanghai World Expo in 2010.

Comments
  • mart.botha - 2012-10-11 10:34

    Any South African who wishes to get into a business bed with the Chinese is retarded. It is patently obvious that the Chinese Government is a law unto itself and that the Chinese people are abused wholesale. Does this sound familiar to you, the previously disadvantaged people of South Africa??. Stand up in solidarity with China's poor and disadvantaged who are facing this and many more abuses. To buy 'Made in China' and to do business with the Chinese is no different to supporting the South African Government during apartheid....let your conscience be your guide when you consider this analogy. Do not be enamoured by short term gain.....that's what prostitutes do !

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