News24

National order recipients list

2005-09-27 16:50

Pretoria - South African Nobel Prize winners John Maxwell (JM) Coetzee and Aaron Klug were awarded the national order of Mapungubwe in gold by President Thabo Mbeki on Tuesday.

"John Maxwell Coetzee is awarded the Order of Mapungubwe in gold for his exceptional contribution in the field of literature and for putting South Africa on the world stage," said chancellor of national orders Frank Chikane.

Klug received the Order of Mapungubwe in gold for his contributions in the medical field.

Coetzee and Klug received the orders at the Union Buildings in Pretoria during the national orders ceremony where 23 other individuals were awarded with the highest honours South Africa bestows on its citizens and foreigners.

Special award recipients

Coetzee, who now lives in Australia, received his Nobel prize for literature in 2002 while Lithuanian-born Klug received the Nobel prize for chemistry in 1982.

Frank Reginald Nunes Nabarro received the Order in silver while Tebello Nyokong and Himladevi Soodyall were awarded in bronze, for their contributions to science.

Academic Nicolaas Petrus van Wyk Louw was posthumously awarded the Order of iKhamanga in gold for his contributions to literature and advocacy of the rights for African languages.

Arts and Culture Minister Pallo Jordan received the Order of iKhamanga in gold on behalf of his late father, Archibald Campbell Mzolisa Jordan, for his contribution to literature.

South Africa's most capped soccer player Lucas Radebe was awarded the Order in silver for his achievements in sport, while former Drum journalist Henry Nxumalo was awarded in silver posthumously for excellence in South African journalism.

Arts, culture and sports recipients

Allina Ndebele, whose tapestries depict African myths and legends as well as Bible stories, was awarded the Order of iKhamanga in silver for her contributions to the arts.

Veteran actress Sophie Thoke Mgcina was awarded the Order in silver for "excellent musical contribution to, and achievement in, theatre and film".

Stephanus Johannes Lombaard, winner of seven gold and two silver medals at the paralympic games in 1996, 2000 and 2004, received the Order in silver for his athletic achievements and serving as a role model to South Africans.

John Kani and Athol Fugard (whose award was received by his sister) were honoured with the Order of iKhamanga in silver for their contributions to theatre.

Poet, writer and visual artist Peter Edward Clarke received the Order in silver for his contribution to the arts and literature.

Scottish born Marjorie Wallace, who promoted, tutored and advised black and coloured artists, was posthumously awarded in bronze.

Musicians Nobesuthu Gertrude Mbadu, Hilda Tloubatla and Nontsomi Mildred Mangxola of the group Mahotella Queens were awarded the Order of iKhamanga in bronze for their contributions to traditional music. Their long-time collaborator Mahlatini Simon Nkabinde was posthumously awarded in bronze.

Gold winning paralympic athlete Tebogo Mogkalagadi was awarded the Order of iKhamanga in bronze for his "outstanding achievement in paralympics and serving as a role model to all South Africans".

Lifesavers and posthumous awards

Solomon Mahlangu was posthumously awarded the Order of Mendi for bravery in gold, for his role in the freedom struggle.

He was executed by the apartheid government in 1979.

Grant Nigel Kirkland was awarded the Order of Mendi for saving the life of a fellow surfer who was attacked by a shark in April last year and Simon John Mthombeni received the award in bronze for saving the victims of a light aeroplane crash near Pretoria in 1991.

A delegation of members of Indonesia's upper house of parliament as well as descendants of the family of Sheik Yusuf were in attendance for the bestowal of his posthumous award for exceptional contributions in the struggle against colonialism.

"Those who exiled Sheik Yusuf to the distant Cape, they never would have thought how it would bind our two countries together," Chikane said.

Yusuf was exiled from Western Java to the Cape in 1694 by the Dutch East India Company for his allegiance to Javanese ruler Sultan Ageng.

Yusuf's residence at Zandfliet farm in the Cape subsequently became a place of pilgrimage for Muslim people in the area.