New Lockerbie bombing suspects identified

2015-10-15 21:01
A police officer walks by the nose of Pan Am flight 103 in a field near the town of Lockerbie, Scotland where it lay after a bomb aboard exploded, killing a total of 270 people. (Martin Cleaver, AP File)

A police officer walks by the nose of Pan Am flight 103 in a field near the town of Lockerbie, Scotland where it lay after a bomb aboard exploded, killing a total of 270 people. (Martin Cleaver, AP File)

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London - Scottish prosecutors on Thursday said they had identified two new Libyan suspects in the bombing of a Pan Am jet over the Scottish town of Lockerbie in 1988, which killed 270 people.

Scottish and United States officials agree "there is a proper basis in law... to treat two Libyans as suspects in the continuing investigation into the bombing of flight Pan Am 103 over Lockerbie," according to a statement released by prosecutors.

"The two individuals are suspected of involvement, along with Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed Al Megrahi," it added.

Megrahi was found guilty of the bombing in 2001. He is the only person ever convicted of the crime.

Scotland's lead prosecutor on Thursday issued an International Letter of Request to the Libyan attorney general in Tripoli, which identifies the suspects and calls for co-operation.

"The Lord Advocate and the US Attorney General are seeking the assistance of the Libyan judicial authorities for Scottish police officers and the FBI to interview the two named suspects in Tripoli," the statement said.

The Scottish government released Megrahi on compassionate grounds in 2009 after he was diagnosed with terminal cancer. He died in Libya in 2012 still protesting his innocence.

Libya admitted responsibility for the bombing in 2003 and the regime of slain dictator Muammar Gaddafi eventually paid $2.7bn in compensation to victims' families as part of a raft of measures aimed at a rapprochement with the West.

Since the fall of the Gaddafi regime in 2011, British and US detectives have travelled to Libya to investigate whether other perpetrators can be identified.

Read more on:    uk  |  libya  |  air travel

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