Brazil elects far-right congressman Bolsonaro to presidency

2018-10-29 07:02
Jair Bolsonaro, of the Social Liberal Party, flashes a thumbs up at a polling station in Rio de Janeiro. (Silvia Izquierdo, AP, file)

Jair Bolsonaro, of the Social Liberal Party, flashes a thumbs up at a polling station in Rio de Janeiro. (Silvia Izquierdo, AP, file)

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Jair Bolsonaro, a brash far-right congressman who has waxed nostalgic for Brazil's old military dictatorship, won the presidency of Latin America's largest nation on Sunday as voters looked past warnings that he would erode democracy and embraced a chance for radical change after years of turmoil.

The former army captain, who cast himself as a political outsider despite a 27-year career in Congress, became the latest world leader to rise to power by mixing tough, often violent talk with hard-right positions.

READ: Brazil's Amazon at risk if Bolsonaro wins presidency - ecologists

His victory reflected widespread anger at the political class after years of corruption, an economy that has struggled to recover after a punishing recession and a surge in violence.

"I feel in my heart that things will change," Sandra Coccato, a 68-year-old small business owner, said after she voted for Bolsonaro in Sao Paulo.

"Lots of bad people are leaving, and lots of new, good people are entering. There's a light at the end of the tunnel."

Fireworks

In Rio de Janeiro, thousands of Bolsonaro supporters gathered on iconic Copacabana Beach, where fireworks went off.

In Sao Paulo, Brazil's largest city, car horns could be heard honking and crowds celebrated as the results came in. There were also reports of clashes between his backers and opponents in Sao Paulo.

Speaking to supporters from his home in Rio, Bolsonaro recounted how he was stabbed while campaigning last month and almost died.

"I was never alone. I always felt the presence of God and the force of the Brazilian people," he said.

Bolsonaro, who ran on promises to clean up Brazil and bring back "traditional values", said he would respect the constitution and personal liberty.

"That is a promise, not of a party, not the vain word of a man. It's a promise to God," he said, standing next to his wife and many cheering supporters.

Later, he said in a Facebook Live transmission that he had received a call from some world leaders, including US President Donald Trump who wished him good luck.

Addressing supporters in Sao Paulo, his rival, Fernando Haddad of the Workers' Party, did not concede or even mention Bolsonaro by name.

Promise to resist

Instead, his speech was a promise to resist.

"We have the responsibility to mount an opposition, putting national interests, the interests of the entire Brazilian people, above everything," Haddad said. "Brazil has never needed the exercise of citizenship more than right now."

He later added: "Don't be afraid. We are here. We are together!"

Brazil's top electoral court said Bolsonaro won with just over 55% of the vote, compared with just under 45% for Haddad.

Bolsonaro went into Sunday the clear front-runner after getting 46% of the vote to Haddad's 29% in the first round of voting on October 7, when 13 contenders were on the ballot.

Opinion polls in recent weeks had him leading by as much as 18 percentage points, but the race tightened in the last few days.

Several Brazilian heavyweights came out against him, arguing that he was a direct risk to the world's fourth-largest democracy.

His rise was powered by disgust with the political system.

In particular, many Brazilians were furious with the Workers' Party for its role in the mammoth graft scheme uncovered by the "Operation Car Wash" investigation.

Haddad struggled to build momentum with his promises of a return to the boom times by investing in health and education and reducing poverty.

Along the way, Bolsonaro's candidacy also raised serious concerns that he would roll back civil rights and weaken institutions in what remains a young democracy.

He frequently disparaged women, gays and blacks, and said he would name military men to his Cabinet.

Minutes after he was elected, several international human rights groups put out statements demanding that Bolsonaro respect Brazil's democracy.

In a highly unusual moment earlier on Sunday, the chief justice of the Supreme Court, Jose Dias Toffoli, read out part of the Constitution to reporters after he voted.

"The future president must respect institutions, must respect democracy, the rule of law, the judiciary branch, the national Congress and the legislative branch," Toffoli said in remarks many took to be a rebuke of Bolsonaro and his more extreme positions.

As late as Sunday morning, Haddad was still holding out hope that he could win after receiving several key endorsements late on Saturday.

Among them was a popular former Supreme Court justice, Joaquim Barbosa, who tweeted support for Haddad, saying Bolsonaro's candidacy scared him.

Likewise, former Attorney General Rodrigo Janot, one of the biggest crusaders against corruption in the Workers' Party in recent years, also endorsed Haddad.

One of the most important endorsements, particularly for young people, came from YouTube personality Felipe Neto, whose channel has nearly 27 million followers.

Neto said he was troubled by Bolsonaro's comments a week ago that "red" leftists would be run out of Brazil.

"In 16 years of the (Workers' Party), I have been robbed, but never threatened," Neto said on Twitter.

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