Military 'crucial' to ousting Maduro: Venezuela opposition chief

2019-01-31 17:16
Opposition National Assembly President Juan Guaido, who declared himself interim president of Venezuela, speaks to reporters during a walk out against President Nicolas Maduro, in Caracas. (Ariana Cubillos, AP)

Opposition National Assembly President Juan Guaido, who declared himself interim president of Venezuela, speaks to reporters during a walk out against President Nicolas Maduro, in Caracas. (Ariana Cubillos, AP)

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

Support from the Venezuelan military is "crucial" to efforts to oust President Nicolas Maduro, opposition leader Juan Guaido wrote in The New York Times on Wednesday.

Guaido said that secret meetings had been held with members of the security forces, and that most of those in uniform agreed that the status quo could not continue.

"The military's withdrawal of support from Mr Maduro is crucial to enabling a change in government, and the majority of those in service agree that the country's recent travails are untenable," Guaido wrote.

"The transition will require support from key military contingents. We have had clandestine meetings with members of the armed forces and the security forces."

READ: Surprise arrival of Russia plane to Venezuela fuels intrigue

White House spokesperson Sarah Sanders tweeted a link to Guaido's op-ed along with the message: "America stands with the people of Venezuela."

Guaido declared himself interim president last week, arguing that Maduro's re-election was illegitimate and that he, as president of the National Assembly, was constitutionally mandated to step in.

He quickly earned the support of the US and several Latin American countries, and six major European nations have told Maduro to call fresh elections by the weekend or they too will recognise his opponent.

Venezuela - which has the world's largest proven oil reserves - has suffered an economic meltdown under Maduro's leadership, marked by hyperinflation and shortages of basic necessities such as food and medicine.

Millions have been left in poverty, while 2.3 million more have fled the country, unleashing a migration crisis in South America.

KEEP UPDATED on the latest news by subscribing to our FREE newsletter.

- FOLLOW News24 on Twitter

Read more on:    venezuela
NEXT ON NEWS24X

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.

Inside News24

 
/News
Traffic Alerts
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.