More than 25 000 murdered in Mexico in 2017, country's deadliest year

2018-01-21 18:03
Aztec High School students and area residents gather for a candlelight vigil in Aztec on December 7, after a shooting at the high school. (Russell Contreras, AP)

Aztec High School students and area residents gather for a candlelight vigil in Aztec on December 7, after a shooting at the high school. (Russell Contreras, AP)

Multimedia   ·   User Galleries   ·   News in Pictures Send us your pictures  ·  Send us your stories

Mexico City - Mexico saw a total of 25 339 murders last year, official data has shown, after 2017 was already established as a record-breaking year based on killings carried out until November.

The interior ministry on Saturday said 2219 people were murdered in December 2017.

Authorities began collecting data in 1997, and the previous record high of 22 409 occurred in 2011.

The homicide rate per 100,000 inhabitants meanwhile climbed to 20.51, against 16.80 in 2016, when 20 545 were murdered.

Mexico is convulsing from a wave of violence linked to drug trafficking that has left almost 200 000 dead since December 2006, when former president Felipe Calderon's government launched a controversial military anti-drug operation that, according to its critics, has only led to more murders and attacks.

The figures do not detail how many of the murders are linked to organised crime but experts say it is probably a large majority since the bulk were recorded in states where drug cartels are deeply entrenched, such as southern Guerrero and eastern Veracruz.

Within the last year, even states that were previously relatively peaceful, such as Baja California Sur, northwestern Colima and central Guanajuato, were shaken by violence.

Analysts believe this may be linked to a surge in the number of autonomous cells following the capture of the heads of major drug cartels.

Criminal gangs have also diversified, trafficking in stolen gasoline, engaging in extortion, kidnapping for ransom or people trafficking.

In a bid to address the issue, Mexico's congress last week approved a controversial internal security law that would formalise the military's role in domestic security.

The move drew criticism from rights groups concerned about the militarisation of the country - while UN rights chief Zeid Ra'ad Al-Hussein said earlier this month it "risks weakening incentives for the civilian authorities to fully assume their law enforcement roles".

Read more on:    mexico  |  mexico city  |  mexico drug war

Join the conversation!

24.com encourages commentary submitted via MyNews24. Contributions of 200 words or more will be considered for publication.

We reserve editorial discretion to decide what will be published.
Read our comments policy for guidelines on contributions.
NEXT ON NEWS24X

Inside News24

 
/News
 

Keep your family and pets safe from rabies

The recent outbreak of rabies in South Africa has brought to light how terrible this disease is and how as pet parents we need to be vigilant to keep our families safe.

 

Paws

5 scientific benefits of owning a cat
Why we love cats
8 great natural remedies for your pet
How to clean your dog’s eyes
Traffic Alerts
Traffic
There are new stories on the homepage. Click here to see them.
 
English
Afrikaans
isiZulu

Hello 

Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.


Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Settings

Location Settings

News24 allows you to edit the display of certain components based on a location. If you wish to personalise the page based on your preferences, please select a location for each component and click "Submit" in order for the changes to take affect.




Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.