Rabbi says gun 'miraculously jammed' in California attack

2019-04-29 09:37

In the minutes after the gunman fled the scene of a shooting that killed a woman inside a Southern California synagogue, a wounded Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein wrapped his bloodied hand in a prayer shawl, stood on a chair and addressed the panicked congregation, vowing to stay strong in the face of the deadly attack targeting his community.

"We are a Jewish nation that will stand tall. We will not let anyone take us down. Terrorism like this will not take us down," Goldstein recalled telling his congregants after the gunfire erupted on Saturday at Chabad of Poway.

Congregant Lori Kaye, 60, was killed in the shooting, which injured Goldstein, 8-year-old Noya Dahan and her 34-year-old uncle, Almog Peretz, authorities said.

Hours after the three wounded were released from hospitals, Goldstein described the onslaught at a news conference on Sunday outside the synagogue north of San Diego.

Goldstein said he was preparing for a service on the last day of Passover, a holiday celebrating freedom, and heard a loud sound. He turned around, and a saw a young man wearing sunglasses standing in front of him with a rifle.

"I couldn't see his eyes. I couldn't see his soul," Goldstein said. He raised his hands and lost one of his fingers in the shooting.

And then, Goldstein said, "miraculously the gun jammed".

The attack on Saturday came exactly six months after a mass shooting in a Pittsburgh synagogue.

John T Earnest, 19, surrendered to police after bursting into the synagogue and opening fire as about 100 people were worshipping inside.

Earnest, who had no previous contact with law enforcement, may face a hate crime charge in addition to homicide charges when he's arraigned later this week, San Diego County Sheriff William Gore said. He was being held without bail, and it was unclear if he had an attorney. Police searched Earnest's house and said he was also being investigated in connection with an arson attack on a mosque in nearby Escondido, California, on March 24.

'I was scared, really, really scared'

The 8-year-old victim said she had just finished praying and was getting ready to go play with other children when gunshots rang out.

Her uncle rushed her and the other children outside, the girl said.Her leg was bleeding but doctors told her she didn't need surgery, she said."I was scared, really, really scared," she said.

"I didn't see my dad. I thought he was dead."

Her father, 32-year-old Israel Dahan, said he flipped over a folding table as soon as he saw the man enter carrying a long rifle and told people to run. He went to look for his children and found two had been ushered out and his 5-year-old was hiding in the bathroom, he said.

There were indications an AR-type assault weapon might have malfunctioned after the gunman fired numerous rounds inside, Gore said. An off-duty Border Patrol agent fired at the shooter as he fled, missing him but striking his getaway vehicle, the sheriff said.

Shortly after fleeing, Earnest called 911 to report the shooting, San Diego Police Chief David Nisleit said. When an officer reached him on a roadway, "the suspect pulled over, jumped out of his car with his hands up and was immediately taken into custody," he said.

Friends described Kaye as giving, warm and attentive to community members on their birthdays and when they were sick. A wife and mother, she loved gardening and made delicious challah for her family and friends, said Roneet Lev, 55.

Goldstein described her as a pioneering founding member of the congregation and said he was heartbroken by her death. He said the attack could have harmed many more people had the shooter turned toward the sanctuary where so many were praying.

"Lori took the bullet for all of us," the rabbi said, his hands wrapped in bandages. "She didn't deserve to die."

He said that Kaye's physician husband was called to tend to a wounded worshipper and fainted when he realised it was his wife.

'It was a hate crime'

When the gunfire erupted, another worshipper, Shimon Abitbul, said he immediately placed his 2-year-old grandson on the floor and waited for a break in the shooting to grab the boy and sprint away.

Then Abitbul ran back to the shooting scene to try to help a woman he described as having a hole in her chest and who later died, he said on Sunday.

Abitbul, who was visiting from Israel and staying with his daughter and her family in Southern California, said he was still coming to grips with the carnage.

"All of us are human beings," he said. "It doesn't matter if you are Jews or Christians or Muslims."

Peretz, who was wounded in the leg, said he turned around after hearing gunfire and saw the shooter standing by the door. He grabbed his niece by the hand and carried out another child.He then saw a group of children and got them running, "I tell them, 'go this way, go this way’," said Peretz, who is visiting from Israel.

Gore said authorities were reviewing Earnest's social media posts, including what he described as a "manifesto". There was no known threat after Earnest was arrested, but authorities boosted patrols at places of worship on Saturday and again on Sunday as a precaution, police said.

A person identifying himself as John Earnest posted an anti-Jewish screed online about an hour before the attack. The poster described himself as a nursing school student and praised the suspects accused of carrying out deadly attacks on mosques in New Zealand last month that killed 50 and at Pittsburgh's Tree of Life synagogue on October 27, in which 11 people were killed.

"It was a hate crime, no doubt about it," national security adviser John Bolton said on "Fox News Sunday". He said investigators have not seen any connection between the suspect and other extremist groups.

California State University, San Marcos, confirmed that Earnest was a student who was on the dean's list and said the school was "dismayed and disheartened" that he was suspected in "this despicable act".

Trump shares condolences

Goldstein said President Donald Trump called him to share condolences on behalf of the American people.The White House acknowledged the call.

"The President expressed his love for the Jewish people and the entire community of Poway," Deputy Press Secretary Judd Deere said in a statement.

Several dozen people, many wearing black, gathered on a street corner in Poway on Sunday to show their support for the victims and congregation and to call for an end to hate and violence.

They carried signs reading "no more killing" and "Shalom". A young boy sat with a cardboard sign reading "we must do better".

Deb Lira, 71, of San Diego, said she was angry and sickened by the attack in what has long been a peaceful community.

"I'm here because I'm Jewish and this is my message," she said, pointing to a sign that read "never again" and "never forget".

"I will not be silent," she said.



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