The Nonrepresentational: Stevenson gallery offers unrepresented artists a platform

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Ka di Sontaga (© Motlhoki Nono. Courtesy of the artist)
Ka di Sontaga (© Motlhoki Nono. Courtesy of the artist)
  • Stevenson is a Cape Town and Johannesburg based gallery that has been dealing in contemporary art from South Africa as well as Africa and its diaspora since 2003. 
  • The gallery recently collaborated with the Visual Arts Network of South Africa to offer unrepresented artists portfolio review. 
  • The portfolio reviews were followed by a virtual group show titled The Nonrepresentational aimed at making the gallery’s platform available to artists outside Stevenson’s orbit. 

Stevenson gallery recently collaborated with the Visual Arts Network of South Africa (Vansa) to offer portfolio reviews for unrepresented artists. Taking place during the lockdown, these reviews took on the form of virtual studio visits. During the visits Stevenson looked at the artists’ work as well as the way they present themselves to the public in order to offer feedback on both aspects of their professional practice.

Once the visits reached a conclusion, the gallery thought it would be best to further make their expertise and perspective available to artists outside their immediate orbit. The result is The Nonrepresentational: a virtual group show comprising work from twelve of the artists that Stevenson met. Prices for the work range from R1000 to R15 000, excluding framing, taxes and shipping. 
In art criticism ‘nonrepresentational’ is a synonym for ‘abstract’. Used here, it draws attention to the fact that we do not represent the artists in the show, and it echoes the term ‘invitational’, an Americanism that describes a sports tournament open by invitation only.
Stevenson

Below are the artists featured in the show as described by Stevenson. 

Boitumelo Motau

Gog' omnyama (© Boitumelo Motau. Courtesy of artis
Gog' omnyama (© Boitumelo Motau. Courtesy of artist)

This multidisciplinary artist works predominantly in photography with a growing drawing practice that he uses to engage audiences on mythologies, religion and memory. 

Callan Grecia

Self portrait with long hair and altered monogram
Self portrait with long hair and altered monogram (© Callan Grecia. Courtesy of the artist)

Using acrylic paintings, Grecia explores identity and democracy in the post-Apartheid condition.

Celimpilo Mazibuko

Boy's Room (© Celimpilo Mazibuko. Courtesy of the
Boy's Room (© Celimpilo Mazibuko. Courtesy of the artist)

Through documentary photography Mazibuko confronts land injustice in post-Apartheid South Africa.

Heinrich Minnie

Homunculus I (Water) (© Heinrich Minne. Courtesy o
Homunculus I (Water) (© Heinrich Minne. Courtesy of the artist)

Using video and installation the artist explores topics around the urbanisation and digitisation of the everyday. 

Io Makandal

Breezy (© Io Makandal. Courtesy of the artist)
Breezy (© Io Makandal. Courtesy of the artist)

The artist’s media drawings display an interest in the evolving dynamic between the urban environment and climate change.

Lebogang Mogul Mabusela

Msoon Wurcko (© Lebogang Mogul Mabusela. Courtesy
Msoon Wurcko (© Lebogang Mogul Mabusela. Courtesy of artist)

Armed with performance, sculpture (installation) and printmaking the artist interrogates gendered experiences, capitalism and race for black femmes. 

Londiwe Mtshali

Ukumboza 2 (© Londiwe Mtshali. Courtesy of the art
Ukumboza 2 (© Londiwe Mtshali. Courtesy of the artist)

Using self-portraiture, the artist engages the metaphysical and performativity of rituals. 

Nico Athene:

Show Me Love (© Nico Athene. Courtesy of the artis
Show Me Love (© Nico Athene. Courtesy of the artist)

In a bid to disrupt heteronormativity the artist interrogates body politics, gendered labour and intimacy through video and performance.

Nonkululeko Dube

Justice for the Khosa family (© Nonkululeko Dube.
Justice for the Khosa family (© Nonkululeko Dube. Courtesy of the artist)

Using conceptual photography the photojournalist visualises South Africa’s collective traumas for cathartic purposes.

Motlhoki Nono

Ka di Sontaga (© Motlhoki Nono. Courtesy of the ar
Ka di Sontaga (© Motlhoki Nono. Courtesy of the artist)

Through multimedia prints, Nono engages the matrilineal relationships and generational burdens of culture on women. 

Tshepiso Mabula

Iyeza La Mangisi (© Tshepiso Mabula. Courtesy of t
Iyeza La Mangisi (© Tshepiso Mabula. Courtesy of the artist)

The artist uses intimate portraits of Black South Africa’s working class to reconcile history with current affairs. 

Valerie Asiimwe Amani:

Blind Faith (© Valerie Asiimwe Amani. Courtesy of
Blind Faith (© Valerie Asiimwe Amani. Courtesy of the artist)

With the use of digital collaging and illustration, Amani visualises the complexities of identity politics and the consequences of colonialism. 


To view or buy work from The Nonrepresentational visit Stevenson’s viewing room here.    





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