In anticipation of Brittle Paper’s Decade Project

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Brittle Paper will host a month long virtual festival to examine the ways that African literature has developed in the last decade (Twitter)
Brittle Paper will host a month long virtual festival to examine the ways that African literature has developed in the last decade (Twitter)
  • The online literary magazine focused on African literary matters turns 10 this year.
  • To celebrate it will be hosting a month long festival looking back at the development of African literature over the last decade.
  • The festival will include thoughts from the likes of Taiye Selasi, Chinelo Okparanta, Prof. Simon Gikandi, Kalaf Epalanga, Ben Okri, Minna Salami and Chris Abani.


Brittle Paper is an online literary magazine. Through diverse content, the platform looks to inspire, entertain and empower readers by giving them a diverse and immersive experience of literature from the African continent and the diaspora. 

What they do

  • Feature news about books and daily happenings in the literary scene
  • Publish fiction, poetry, book reviews and essays 
  • Bring African literature on to digital spaces
  • Publicly document the contemporary African literary scene

After doing this for ten years, Brittle Paper is marking the occasion by hosting The Decade Project, a month long virtual festival of ideas.

Throughout September (until 2 October) they will be featuring specially curated content to celebrate the growth of African literature over the past ten years. The content — including interviews, essays and reviews — will be created in partnership with University of Wisconsin-Madison’s African Studies Program. Readers can also expect content from writers like Taiye Selasi, Chinelo Okparanta, Lola Shoneyin, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Chinelo Okparanta, Prof. Simon Gikandi, Kalaf Epalanga, Ben Okri, Minna Salami and Chris Abani.

Speaking about the virtual festival, Brittle Paper said: 

We thought you’d want to know what these individuals, who have done so much to shape the decade, think about African literature, how far it’s come, and what the future holds.


To recharge and prepare for this month-long virtual festival, Brittle Paper is taking a break until September 6. During this period the publication won’t be producing anything new or considering new submissions for fiction, non-fiction or poetry. 

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