Beach Apartheid: A history of South African beaches and politics

accreditation
Share your Subscriber Article
You have 5 articles to share every month. Send this story to a friend!
0:00
play article
Subscribers can listen to this article
A black man serves drinks at a beach party on Clifton Beach, Cape Town, South Africa, circa 1990. (Photo by Romano Cagnoni/Getty Images)
A black man serves drinks at a beach party on Clifton Beach, Cape Town, South Africa, circa 1990. (Photo by Romano Cagnoni/Getty Images)

Under the Reservation of Separate Amenities Act of 1953 all public premises, vehicles and services were racially segregated. 

Apart from public roads and streets, the use of amenities spanning bathrooms, benches, parks, church halls, town halls, cinemas, theaters, cafes, restaurants, hotels, schools and universities was reserved in accordance with one’s racial classification. 

This act was not the first to institutionalise the separation of amenities by race. It followed the Urban Areas Act of 1923 that relegated black people to townships as well as the 1949 amendment of the Railways and Harbours Act of 1916 which segregated trade and mobility. 

Support independent journalism
Subscribe to News24 for just R75 per month to read all our investigative and in-depth journalism. You can cancel any time.
Subscribe
Already a subscriber? Sign in