Celebrate the Constitution by getting to know the supreme law of the land

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President Nelson Mandela signs the country's new constitution while ANC's chief negociator during the drafting process, Cyril Ramaphosa looks on, at Sharpeville stadium near Vereeniging on 10 December 1996.
President Nelson Mandela signs the country's new constitution while ANC's chief negociator during the drafting process, Cyril Ramaphosa looks on, at Sharpeville stadium near Vereeniging on 10 December 1996.
  • On 4 December 1996 the Constitutional Court approved the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa.
  • Today, 10 December 2020 will then mark 24 years since the Nelson Mandela signed the Constitution into South African law. 
  • To commemorate 24 years of the Constitution and in preparation of its 25th year, Constitution Hill has employed a number of arts and culture-based initiatives to make the Constitution and its history more accessible to audience.


The Constitution is the supreme law of the land. No other law or government action can supersede the provisions of the Constitution.

On 4 December 1996 the Constitutional Court approved the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. Six days later it was signed into law by the first democratically elected president, Nelson Mandela, in Sharpeville, Vereeniging.

In a statement released by Constitution Hill regarding this commemoration said: 

Despite the difficulties we have experienced over the past 24 years as a constitutional democracy, what remains clear is that the people have refused to abandon hope and have resisted writing South Africa off when many others have.

As South Africa heads into the 25th anniversary of the Constitution, Constitution Hill is employing a number of initiatives to make the Constitution and its history more accessible to a variety of South African audiences in order to encourage more civilians to actively engage with and know the Constitution. Some of the initiatives are as follows: 

Limited-edition postcards: 

To honour this day 24 years later, Constitution Hill has produced 27 limited-edition postcards. Each postcard bears words from the Preamble of the Constitution along with an illustration of one of the 27 rights protected in South Africa’s Bill of Rights. The post cards were illustrated by artists Sindiso Nyoni, Balekane Legoabe, Nina Torr, Ndumiso Nyoni, Octavia Roodt, Zinhle Zulu and Khayalethu Mtshali. The limited-edition postcards are available at the precinct for those who mark 10 December by visiting the heritage site. 

Visiting Constitution Hill:

As a part of this celebration, entry into Constitution Hill will be free from 10 December 2020 to 10 January 2021. In order to observe Covid-19 regulations, the public is encouraged to book their visits through Webtickets.

Music:

The Ndlovu Youth Choir will lend their voices to a sung rendition of the Preamble of the Constitution. This will be played across public radio stations and Constitution Hill’s social media platforms. 

Social media engagement:

To mark 24 years, the heritage site will use their social media platforms to share 24 of the milestones made on the journey toward making the Constitution. 

Virtual exhibition:

The artwork that will appear on the commemorative postcards has been developed into an online exhibition about the making of the South African Constitution. Titled Our Struggle, Our Freedom, Our Constitution each of the show’s artworks considers a declaration made by the Bill of Rights. This can be seen on the heritage site’s website. 

Constitution Hill website:

On the website, viewers will have access to infographics and essays about the Constitution. This includes a look at the history of the Constitution, an explanation of the Constitution, as well as elaborations on each of the declarations made in the Bill of Rights.  

To learn more and engage, visit www.ourconstitution.constitutionhill.org or Constitution Hill of Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. 

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