Chef Jane Nshuti is challenging the myth that African food is meat-centric

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Jane Nshuti's journey has been informed by finding refuge and community through food. (Photo by Justine Sibomana)
Jane Nshuti's journey has been informed by finding refuge and community through food. (Photo by Justine Sibomana)

Jane Nshuti, plant-based African food educator and Tamu by Jane founder, has a desire to nourish stomachs, souls and minds. Her recipes and food philosophies intertwine to deliver knowledge about food security, community and a passion for African foodways.  

Food has a deep meaning for Nshuti and she’s found her way back to it time and time again through a traumatic life. As a young girl fleeing the war in Rwanda in 1994, losing both her parents in the process, she learnt how to cook in a refugee camp in the DRC, where she stayed with her siblings. As children, they kicked into survival mode and had to learn to take care of themselves, with Jane being the youngest at just 9 years old at the time. "Because I was young, I couldn't really go out and look for jobs, so my older siblings would go and find work to do. And they made me their cook. Somebody needed to. When they came home tired, they needed to find something to eat. And so whatever, they'd bring, it was my responsibility to turn that into something edible."

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