Grandson to the co-founder of South Africa’s first Black Firearms Association donates his archive

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Sergeant Edward Louw, joined the police force at the Sophiatown Police Station to combat gang violence that erupted in the 1960. (Supplied)
Sergeant Edward Louw, joined the police force at the Sophiatown Police Station to combat gang violence that erupted in the 1960. (Supplied)
  • Sergeant Edward Louw was a police officer at the Sophiatown Police Station during the 1960s. 
  • As the co-founder of South Africa’s first firearms association for Black people he helped combat gang violence. 
  • To commemorate his contributions, his grandson, Angelo Louw, has donated his archive. 


Award-winning activist and documentarian Angelo Louw has donated his grandfather's archive to the Trevor Huddleston Memorial Centre, to commemorate the notorious policeman's contribution to the history of Sophiatown. 

Louw's grandfather, Sergeant Edward Louw, joined the police force at the Sophiatown Police Station to combat gang violence that erupted in the 1960s. Sgt Louw was also a co-founder of South Africa's first firearms association for Black people.  

"It is an honour to present the Trevor Huddleston Memorial Centre with my grandfather’s archive. These articles shine a different light on the gang violence that has plagued the area; it shows that the community has never been complacent, but that members of the community fought with their lives to stop the reign of terror since its onset," Louw said.   

Commenting on the recent spurt of racist police violence, Louw said that upon reflection, he believed that people are joining the police force with ulterior motives. 

"My grandfather is testament to the fact that when people join the SAPS with the right motives, to protect and serve the community, the police force can be an alley to the community and not contribute to its plight. There should be stricter criteria in the application process that questions why people want to become police," said Louw 

Angelo Louw has donated his grandfather's archive
Angelo Louw has donated his grandfather's archive to the Trevor Huddleston Memorial Centre. (Supplied)

Louw stressed the importance of the media in covering community stories, fearing that a lot of history will be lost otherwise. 

"We often don’t appreciate the role of the media in capturing our stories, but a piece of history will have been forgotten had it not been for the journalists of these publications. They saw everyday heroes in our communities long before anyone else could," said Louw.

Later this year, in celebration of Sgt Louw's 90th birthday, his family plans to exhibit the articles and other memorabilia that the Trevor Huddleston Memorial Centre. The archive is available for research purposes upon request.

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