In Berlin, a street art show before it's 'game over' for site

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A guide presents the work "Imagine You Could See All the Colours" by Berlin-based illustrator and street artist Herr von Bias at the "Game Over" exhibition in Berlin on October 5, 2021. Located in a casino gone bust in the heart of Berlin, the "Game Over" urban art and culture exhibition, conceived by art collective "The Dixons", features some 60 artists from the fields of graffiti, tape art, installation, mapping and augmented reality. (John MacDougall/ AFP)
A guide presents the work "Imagine You Could See All the Colours" by Berlin-based illustrator and street artist Herr von Bias at the "Game Over" exhibition in Berlin on October 5, 2021. Located in a casino gone bust in the heart of Berlin, the "Game Over" urban art and culture exhibition, conceived by art collective "The Dixons", features some 60 artists from the fields of graffiti, tape art, installation, mapping and augmented reality. (John MacDougall/ AFP)
  • Titled Game Over, the exhibition inspired by videogames is housed in a former casino which is due to be torn down.
  • 80 artists are showcasing their work with the help of an app that enhances the experience. 
  • The special app allows visitors to point their phones at the artwork to discover what lies beyond the analogue painting.


From an image of Hulk who suddenly leaps over your head to a painting that changes its colours, one Berlin street art exhibition offers visitors a chance to experience paintings in 3D.

Called "Game Over", the exhibition inspired by videogames is housed in a former casino stretching over 2 000 square metres (21 500 square feet) which is due to be torn down.

Eighty artists are showcasing their work here, with a dedicated app enhancing the experience.

"After all these dry months with the coronavirus and this, yes, dark world, we have finally created a bit of colour, not only in our lives, but hopefully also in the lives of the visitors and admirers," said Joern Reiners, a member of art group The Dixons and one of the curators of the exhibition.

"We try to bring together the right artists who will continue to develop and evolve creatively and ultimately create completely new layers and processes here."

The Dixons organised a similar pop-up exhibition in 2017, with artists plastering the walls of an old bank with their paintings before the demolition crew moved in.

This time the works stand out against a minimalist background.

But the special app allows visitors to point their phones at the images to discover what lies beyond the analogue painting.

For painter Gita Kurdpoor, the show "which we have created here, together, is like a bit of a school trip feeling."

Berlin is a hub for urban culture and its particularly vibrant street art scene has left its mark on many of the capital's facades.

Tours are organised regularly for visitors to check out the most iconic images.

Most famously, the longest remaining stretch of the Berlin Wall is covered with murals, first painted in 1990 and later restored.

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