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These images capture spatial apartheid and its consequences

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Incomplete houses, part of a stalled municipal development of 1000 houses. The funding allocation was made in 1998, building started in 2003. Officials and a politician gave various reasons for the stalling of the scheme: shortage of water, theft of materials, problems with sewerage disposal, problems caused by the high clay content of the soil and the shortage of funds. By August 2006, 420 houses had been completed. Lady Grey, Eastern Cape. 5 August 2006. (David Goldblatt/ Goodman Gallery)
Incomplete houses, part of a stalled municipal development of 1000 houses. The funding allocation was made in 1998, building started in 2003. Officials and a politician gave various reasons for the stalling of the scheme: shortage of water, theft of materials, problems with sewerage disposal, problems caused by the high clay content of the soil and the shortage of funds. By August 2006, 420 houses had been completed. Lady Grey, Eastern Cape. 5 August 2006. (David Goldblatt/ Goodman Gallery)

Spatial apartheid refers to the deliberate act of putting marginalised peoples in remote areas that make access to economic, social and educational opportunities difficult. This was implemented through the Land Act of 1913 and 1950 Group Areas Act. Families and communities were uprooted from their homes to the outskirts of South Africa's major cities. 

As a result, communities were and continue to be subjected to coerced migration, overpopulation, homelessness, landlessness, underdevelopment, long-distance commuting and displacement. 

Below, Arts24 profiles photographers who make visible the consequences of spatial apartheid.

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