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The women whose voices held up Phil Spector’s Wall of Sound

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Veronica Bennett, Estelle Bennett and Nedra Talley of The Ronettes (Photo by GAB Archive/Redferns/ Getty Images)
Veronica Bennett, Estelle Bennett and Nedra Talley of The Ronettes (Photo by GAB Archive/Redferns/ Getty Images)

The Wall of Sound refers to a technique in music production developed by the late convicted murderer and flagrant music producer Phil Spector at Gold Star Studios in the 1960s.

Created through multitracking, this technique sees various instruments or voices play or singing the same melody until they reach a layered cohesive whole or “symphonic saturation”.

To realise this technique, Spector would spend hours rehearsing songs with vocalists and instrumentalists. While it was easy to achieve the desired instrumentality, few vocalists could achieve the standard. 

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