Zeitz MOCAA closes its doors to ‘reduce the spread’ of the coronavirus

Inside Zeitz MOCAA. (Photo: Hufton+Crow)
Inside Zeitz MOCAA. (Photo: Hufton+Crow)


The Zeitz MOCAA in Cape Town has closed its doors until 6 April following the worldwide outbreak of the coronavirus.

The contemporary art museum released a statement on Tuesday, 17 March saying: "In light of recent developments regarding the impact of Covid-19, Zeitz MOCAA will be temporarily closed until 6 April 2020."

According to Zeitz MOCAA the health of its "staff, guests, partners, and artists is a priority" and they are taking "measures to reduce the spread of the virus according to the guidelines of the World Health Organisation and the South African Government".

The statement added: "We heed the call by Cyril Ramaphosa, the South African president, and his recent address to the nation, that ‘this situation calls for an extraordinary response’ and the government’s plan of action will be followed. We are currently evaluating the impact of these measures on our future exhibitions and programming and are working with artists and stakeholders to evaluate this changing environment."

General admission tickets already booked for this period will either be fully refunded or accepted for entry when the museum re-opens.

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The City of Cape Town also announced that in light of the national disaster declaration by President Cyril Ramaphosa it will withdraw permits for previously approved events due to take place in Cape Town.

The City’s events permit office will also not be accepting or processing any event permit applications until the national disaster is lifted.

"Since last week, several major events which were set to take place in Cape Town this month and in April have either been cancelled and postponed to later dates. A few other event organisers will make announcements in the coming days," a statement read on The City of Cape Town’s official Facebook page.

(Compiled by Herman Eloff. Sources: Zeitz MOCAA/City of Cape Town)