The sweet meaning and surprising origin of Meghan and Harry's baby's name, Lilibet

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Meghan Markle and Queen Elizabeth
Meghan Markle and Queen Elizabeth
Photo: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images
  • Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have welcomed their second child together, a baby girl!
  • Lilibet 'Lili' Diana Mountbatten-Windsor was born on Friday, 4 June, and named after her grandmother, Princess Diana, and great-grandmother, Her Majesty the Queen.
  • Lilibet has a special meaning to the royal family, with Prince Philip thought to be the last person in the queen's life to call her by the affectionate term.


Meghan Markle has welcomed her second child with Prince Harry.

Lilibet 'Lili' Diana Mountbatten-Windsor was born on Friday, 4 June, the couple shared on Sunday, and was named after her grandmother, Princess Diana, and great-grandmother, Her Majesty the Queen.

The royal family have passed on their congratulations to the couple, saying they are "delighted" by the news of their new arrival – the 11th great-grandchild for the queen, and eighth in line to the British throne.

Channel24 speculated ahead of little Lilibet's birth she may just be named after her grandmother and great-grandfather; Phillipa, after Prince Philip, who died on 9 April, was also a popular choice. It's fitting then that Lilibet, the queen's nickname, was the name Harry and Meghan settled on – Prince Philip was thought to be the last person in Her Majesty's life to call her by the affectionate term.

The queen even signed off a handwritten note placed on the Duke of Edinburgh's casket with the nickname. Alongside a sword, his naval cap and a wreath of flowers selected by his wife, was a handwritten note that read, in part: "I love you."

Of course, it is King George VI, who was the first man in the queen's life to call her by the sweet name. He famously said of his two daughters: "Lilibet is my pride. Margaret is my joy."

How then did the unusual, but sweet-sounding name, come to be? When she was young, the queen herself was unable to pronounce the name, Elizabeth. Instead, stumbling over her words, Lilibet was born. 

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