REVIEW | If kwaito is dead, who killed it? A personal account

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On 31 October 1998, TKZee released what would arguably become one of the greatest bodies of work in South Africa's relatively short history of popular music.(Facebook/ TKZee)
On 31 October 1998, TKZee released what would arguably become one of the greatest bodies of work in South Africa's relatively short history of popular music.(Facebook/ TKZee)

In the mid to late 2000s, a sentiment trickled into the mainstream. Apparently, kwaito was dead. Even though I'd never really heard any official declaration that kwaito was indeed dead, out of nowhere I began hearing kwaito artists declaring "kwaito was not dead".

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