Herman Mashaba | The Clicks saga demonstrates the need for our silent majority to speak up

accreditation
0:00
play article
Subscribers can listen to this article
EFF leader Julius Malema addresses his supporters during a picket outside Clicks Store at the Mall of the North in Polokwane.
EFF leader Julius Malema addresses his supporters during a picket outside Clicks Store at the Mall of the North in Polokwane.
(Photo by Phill Magakoe / AFP)

VOICES


When I launched ActionSA I spoke about the idea of the good, law-abiding and hard-working majority in our country, the people who form the majority and yet have been silenced by our politics.

No event could capture the essence of this notion more than the Clicks saga that unfolded this week.

The vast majority of South Africans recognise that the adverts were deeply insensitive in a country that lives with the pain of racial inequality from our unjust past. Most South Africans would not deny that the adverts demeaned black people by advancing the idea that black identity is inferior to white identity.

As someone who has worked for 38 years in the hair care and beauty industry, particularly trying to advance the idea of pride in black beauty, there is no doubt that these adverts were horrific and required accountability.

Instead what we, the reasonable majority of people in South Africa, witnessed was anarchy. The EFF’s decision to close down Clicks stores, intimidate shoppers and workers and damage property was no less counter-productive than the adverts themselves.

What we must learn to understand as the majority of our country, is that neither the designers of those adverts nor those who violently closed the stores, speak on our behalf or serve our interests with their actions.

READ: The EFF can no longer take its fight to Clicks’ doorsteps

The adverts set back our already stalled progress to heal the wounds of our past by ensuring that all South Africans are treated with dignity. Those who close stores, intimidate workers and damage property do harm to the image of our country and our economy. Most of all, these actions by ridiculous and radical minorities hurt the majority of reasonable, law-abiding and good people of our country.

The timing of the news that our GDP shrunk by 51% from the second quarter of last year to the second quarter of this year could not have been more appropriate. We face the prospects of unemployment rising above 50%, businesses closing and a massive tax shortfall. The economic consequences of all this will be more devastating for many of our people living with extreme poverty.

This is a time when we need to project a more positive image of our country to signify an economic turnaround, something which lends confidence to the world that South Africa is reforming and is open for business.

This is a time when we need to project a more positive image of our country to signify an economic turnaround
Herman Mashaba

When the world, prospective investors and monetary agencies see the images of stores being chained shut, workers being intimidated and petrol bombs exploding at shop entrances, they see an altogether different country.

What they see is a country that does not exercise rights and protections through its institutions, which were heralded with our Constitution. They see lawlessness, anarchy and a country where law enforcement stands back and does nothing while crimes are committed in their presence. They see frightened workers and patrons being intimidated for the actions of people far removed in corporate headquarters.

The majority of South Africans would view the necessary recourse to those adverts as residing with institutions such as the SA Human Rights Commission and the Equality Court – both with considerable powers and a good track record of holding offenders to account.

Most of us would observe the remedial steps taken by Clicks and, should they be deemed inadequate, exercise our consumers power to shop elsewhere.

We have to begin asking ourselves some very serious questions as the majority in our country. Are we comfortable with either those adverts or the anarchist behaviour of the EFF speaking on our behalf?

It is time for us to end our silence and being spoken for by obscene, extreme and radical minorities
Herman Mashaba

Are we comfortable to live with the repercussions of a more divided country and even lower image of our economy? What do we stand to benefit from the malicious destruction of property and by extension our economy? How are we, as a society, hoping to guarantee people’s right to dignity when we allow businesses to be shut down and our people being barred from work?

There is no dignity in people being unemployed and unable to provide for themselves and their families.

READ: We expected that reaction from Cosatu: Mashaba hits back

Why are we silent in the face of such lunacy? Better yet, the most silent person in our country is President Cyril Ramaphosa who has again failed to provide any leadership when it was needed.

It is time for us to end our silence and being spoken for by obscene, extreme and radical minorities.

The Penny Sparrows, Adam Catzavelos and designers of these adverts do not speak on our behalf. Neither should those who damage property, petrol bomb stores and intimidate innocent workers and shoppers.

As much as we are working to put in place a political alternative in South Africa that will bring hope and prosperity to all of its people, the silent majority in our country needs to speak up and ensure that these minorities who derail our national project are seen for what they are – minorities.

* Mashaba is president of ActionSA


facebook
twitter
linkedin
instagram

Delivering the 

news you need

+27 11 713 9001
news@citypress.co.za
www.citypress.co.za
69 Kingsway Rd, Auckland Park

We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For only R75 per month, you have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today.
Subscribe to News24

E-Editions

Read the digital editions of City Press here.
Read now
Voting Booth
Tourism Minister Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane will act as health minister after President Cyril Ramaphosa placed Health Minister Dr Zweli Mkhize on special leave while the SIU completes the probe into the irregular Digital Vibes contract. What are your thoughts on this?
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Special leave is a whitewash.
40% - 122 votes
SA’s tourism sector needs undivided attention.
4% - 12 votes
Let's wait and see
9% - 28 votes
What is the point of deputy ministers?
46% - 140 votes
Vote