Church seeks state help to claim R1 million owed

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The church has been torn apart by infighting over the estate of deceased leader Glayton Modise. Photo: Trevor Kunene
The church has been torn apart by infighting over the estate of deceased leader Glayton Modise. Photo: Trevor Kunene

NEWS


The International Pentecostal Holiness Church (IPHC) is embroiled in a bitter contract squabble with a Sandton-based manufacturer after the latter allegedly failed to deliver a new dye-sublimation machine that costs almost R1 million.

City Press understands that efforts by the church to resolve the dispute have fallen on deaf ears, as it appears from an application filed at the Johannesburg High Court on June 1 that Lesedi Fireworx Marketing has failed to reimburse IPHC the R940 355 it paid to secure the machine three years ago.

The company allegedly delivered the wrong machine.

According to the agreement signed by both parties in July 2019, the machine was meant to aid the Zuurbekom-based church in Gauteng in its endeavours to print more fabric for its mass uniform-making operations.

READ: Church's unhygienic holy war

“The [intended] machine was a new model and would properly and efficiently carry out its function of printing on fabric.

“It would be formally handed over to the plaintiff (IPHC) together with a demonstration of the manner in which the machine operates,” the court documents say.

However, after the funds were directly deposited into the company’s account in November 2019, Lesedi Fireworx Marketing allegedly breached the agreement by handing over an old fabric printing machine that was not in the initial agreement.

Further, the defendant is in material breach of its objections under the agreement in that it failed, notwithstanding demand, to formally hand over the machine and demonstrate the manner in which it operates. The machine is materially defective in that some of the heads of the machine do not shoot ink as they are required to do.


The church, which has 3 million members, wants a court order to compel Lesedi Fireworx Marketing to rectify the fault.

“The plaintiff, without prejudice to its rights, called upon the defendant to rectify the defects and afforded the defendant notice to do so within a period of two weeks, which constituted a reasonable period of notice.

“However, the defendant failed to rectify the defects within such period and persisted in such failure after being called upon once again to attend to rectify such defects…

“In the premises, the plaintiff is entitled to a refund of the sum of R940 355. The plaintiff tenders to return the machine to the defendant against the refund of the said sum.”

Lesedi Fireworx Marketing did not respond to City Press’ efforts to obtain comment.


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