Zanu-PF courts white voters amid reports of intimidation ahead of election

Thousands of opposition party supporters cheer leading opposition challenger Nelson Chamisa during a rally in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, on Saturday (July 21 2018). Just 3 percentage points now separate Chamisa and former Robert Mugabe deputy and current president Emmerson Mnangagwa ahead of the July 30 presidential vote, according to a new survey by the Afrobarometer research group. Picture: Jerome Delay/AP
Thousands of opposition party supporters cheer leading opposition challenger Nelson Chamisa during a rally in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, on Saturday (July 21 2018). Just 3 percentage points now separate Chamisa and former Robert Mugabe deputy and current president Emmerson Mnangagwa ahead of the July 30 presidential vote, according to a new survey by the Afrobarometer research group. Picture: Jerome Delay/AP

Voter intimidation, threats of violence and coercion including people forced to attend political rallies are being increasingly reported ahead of Zimbabwe’s elections on July 30, especially in rural areas, the United Nations’ human rights office said on Tuesday.

“There has also been the worrying use of disparaging language against female political candidates,” UN human rights spokesperson Elizabeth Throssell told a news briefing in Geneva.

“We call on the authorities – and political parties and their supporters – to ensure that the elections are not marred by such acts so that all Zimbabweans can participate free from fear in a credible election process,” she said.

Meanwhile, Zimbabwe’s President Emmerson Mnangagwa addressed a crowd of white voters on Saturday in an attempt to improve relations ahead of the election, a marked shift from his predecessor Robert Mugabe whose policies became increasingly racially divisive.

Mnangagwa, who came to power when Mugabe was removed in a de facto coup in November, is on the campaign trail ahead of what is expected to be a tight contest with his main rival, Nelson Chamisa, the 40-year-old leader of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC).

The white Zimbabweans who are left in the country – estimated at around 30,000 – would usually vote MDC or for another opposition party, given the strained relationship with Mnangagwa’s ruling Zanu-PF.

But Mnangagwa, a 75-year-old former Mugabe ally, has pledged to fix racial divisions and end the violent seizure of white-owned commercial farms – a policy that Mugabe said was intended to redress post-colonial imbalances.

Supporters of President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s ruling Zanu-PF party attend an election rally in Mhondoro, Zimbabwe, on Tuesday (July 24 2018). Picture: Philimon Bulawayo/Reuters

Many farms ended up in the hands of powerful politicians, soldiers or local chiefs and fell into disrepair.

“I know of some chiefs who have moved from one farm to another. Then they run it down. Then he leaves that farm and he is issued another one. He runs it down. That time is gone,” Mnangagwa told a crowd of several hundred white Zimbabweans in Borrowdale, a wealthy suburb in the capital Harare.

Mnangagwa is hoping to revive a once promising economy, end chronic cash shortages and bring down soaring unemployment. In order to do this he needs the help of Western donors who want to see the issue of white-owned land addressed.

Many of the white Zimbabweans in the albeit partisan crowd saw Mnangagwa’s fig leaf as a major turning point.

“He’s recognising everyone as the same. We’re all one now, which is beautiful,” said mining engineer Cais Carstens.

“This has never happened before, so it’s good.”

Zimbabwe’s Zanu-PF leader Emmerson Mnangagwa addresses an election campaign rally at Rudhaka Stadium in Marondera, about 100km east of the capital Harare on Saturday (July 21 2018). Zimbabweans will go to the polls on July 30 to elect new members of the Parliament and president. Picture: Aaron Ufumeli/EPA

Opponents dismissed the event as a publicity stunt backed by people with political and financial interests.

“I’m not surprised. You have to look at where this took place,” said David Coltart, an MDC senator.

“There are some very wealthy whites there who have long established connections with Zanu. It’ll be the community who have business connections.”

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