The new BBC Earth doccie is spellbinding viewing

Northern white rhinos are on the very brink of extinction. Just two females are left alive on the planet living at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya. Picture: Supplied by BBC Studios
Northern white rhinos are on the very brink of extinction. Just two females are left alive on the planet living at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya. Picture: Supplied by BBC Studios

If you are experiencing more than a bit of cabin fever after 40-plus days in lockdown, BBC Earth is ready to take you on a wondrous journey to a whole new Africa this Sunday afternoon.

Your virtual safari bus is DStv’s channel 184 where the documentary series Seven Worlds, One Planet, with the inimitable Sir David Attenborough at the helm, is travelling through Africa and it is glorious.

If you have watched the previous episodes, then you are very lucky.

If not, make sure to book your spot in front of the television on Sunday and prepare to rediscover your continent.

As always with BBC Earth documentaries, the filming is spectacular and beautiful. You get to see our wonderfully diverse continent in technicolour detail.

Millions of years ago, incredible forces ripped apart the Earth’s crust creating seven extraordinary continents.

Seven Worlds, One Planet reveals how each distinct continent has shaped the unique animal life found there.

Everyone has filmed in Africa. The challenge for our team was to film new animals or new behaviour, and also put a new slant on the continent
Giles Badger, producer of the Africa episode

Africa is a spectacularly interesting continent, particularly if you look at the range of ecosystems and natural habitat we have.

Rainforests, vast deserts with stunning sand dunes, coastlines that go on forever, high mountains and big waterfalls – it’s all in this wonderful place we call home.

Producer of the Africa episode, Giles Badger, talks about the experience of filming here: “Everyone has filmed in Africa. The challenge for our team was to film new animals or new behaviour, and also put a new slant on the continent.

"We wanted to explain how some unique bit of behaviour that we filmed allowed an animal to survive in the vast array of landscapes that Africa contains.

“The Africa film closes the series and the last five or 10 minutes is, hopefully, extremely powerful.

"It talks about the state of the continent and indeed the world’s wildlife, which has been driven to the point where some scientists believe we are right on the edge of a mass extinction of life.

Picture: Supplied by BBC Studios

“How we choose to treat our wildlife and conserve our wildlife will dictate the future of all life on Earth,” Badger says.

During the show you will see Western chimpanzees from Ivory Coast; the cichlid in Malawi, the remarkably beautiful brown hyenas in Namibia and the temmincks pangolins in South Africa.

Besides the quite incredible scenery, you should be watching because there were some filming firsts in the shooting of this series like filming the brown hyena in the Namib Desert using drones and Sir David with the last two northern white rhinos on earth.

The last episode of Seven Worlds, One Planet airs at 4pm on BBC Earth, DStv channel 184 on Sunday May 10. The series is also available on Catch Up.


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