The Samas will present flowers to living legends

accreditation
0:00
play article
Subscribers can listen to this article
Joyous Celebration co-founder and conductor Lindelani Mkhize is ecstatic to be honoured by the Samas. Photo: Gallo Images / City Press / Leon Sadiki
Joyous Celebration co-founder and conductor Lindelani Mkhize is ecstatic to be honoured by the Samas. Photo: Gallo Images / City Press / Leon Sadiki

TRENDING 


The 27th edition of the South African Music Awards (Samas) will be giving a few legends their flowers. The Samas will be taking place on November 1 and musical icons Lebo M, Lindelani Mkhize and PJ Powers will be the recipients of this prestigious award.

This is one of the categories that the Samas gets right, regularly. Too often we pay homage to prolific artists once they have passed away. This time the legends will be able to smell their flowers which Powers and Mkhize are pleased about.

Powers, best known for the run she had around the iconic 1994 Rugby World Cup with her rendition of The World in Union said: “I feel incredibly proud to be honoured in this way by the Samas and I am in good company with Lebo M, and I feel very excited.”

Mkhize, who is famed for being a founder of gospel group Joyous Celebration, said: “It’s very humbling and unexpected. The people that have been part of me getting here, I am so grateful to. Chicco Twala found me, and he was in Joburg and me in Umlazi. I have no idea what he sees in me. I want to thank all those people Joe Nina, Mdu, Sibongile Khumalo and Bra Hugh Masekela. I want to thank them and my family who have also been supportive and also the friends I grew up with. They inspire me.”

I don’t think any strides have been taken by the local music industry. We are underplayed and I think music is not played across the board.
Afro-pop singer and songwriter PJ Powers

Mkhize started the esteemed gospel group Joyous Celebration with two of his best friends and the three learnt to work together to build something timeless and authoritatively creative.

“We worked together and this South Africa needs to learn this,” he explained.

Reflecting on his doctorate and this lifetime achievement award, Mkhize said: “I am being honoured as a doctor and this achievement award, but it is important to understand how to give it back. I’m not sure if the powers that be understand that. They should help us the same way they build bridges or invite foreign investment.

“If they can learn that, I mean, we have now been overtaken by Nigeria in the global sound. We were on the verge of doing that, but we had no push because our government doesn’t see music as an industry.”

He said he wants to take it upon himself and in doing it would love to help people going about making business out of music.

He recounted the emotions he felt on hearing the news that he would be recognised as a lifetime achiever by the Samas and shared the story about how his name was submitted.

“When I was informed of this honour I asked why me, and I discovered that Ndlamlenze Mpungose from Richards Bay, an R&B artist, submitted my name. I haven’t even met him. I want to thank that young musician for that. He showed that jealousy is not the way. You’d think that lesser-known artists might envy more established ones, but he proved this wrong.”

Afro-pop singer and songwriter Powers said she is working on new music and was in the studio this week and, come 2022, she will be releasing five singles as well as some remixes of her more well-known classics.

She will be collaborating with new artists and has been eyeing a few and thinks Black Coffee would be a perfect combination for Feel So Strong. Powers also really loves the work of deep house band Mi Casa and Afro Soul singer Berita.

Afro pop singer PJ Powers believes more can be done to boost the local music industry. Photo: Nelius Redman

She said the pinnacle moment of her career was when she was bestowed the name Thandeka at the Jabulani Theatre [Soweto Theatre]

in Soweto 1983.

“It was the most pivotal moment and my entire world did a 180-degree turn. It was a glorious prize to win.”

When the curtain closes, she hopes people will still love her.

“I want people to remember I stayed true to myself and was authentic. Someone who was at the right place politically and was never afraid to be partisan with people who are oppressed in this country.

“If I can be remembered as someone who walked their talk that would be the greatest accolade I could ever receive.”

Mkhize commended the strides taken by local music while he cast a thought to the changes he has experienced in his time in the music industry.

“The truth is that the music industry evolves with time. At the same time, even the way people consume music changes, and one needs to adapt. It can be frustrating.

“I started in the industry during the cassette tape era. It had just changed from vinyl LPs. Then we moved to CD and those who couldn’t adapt were seriously affected. Then came the mini disc, a slimmer version of the CD, but that didn’t work.

“Now people are consuming music digitally on their phones, and this happened while we were dealing CD piracy and now we must adapt to digital piracy. It is a process we are still dealing with.”

Powers shared a contrary view: “I don’t think any strides have been taken by the local music industry. We are underplayed and I think music is not played across the board. I know people who just never get play. We need to open up the stronghold that radio has on music.

The people that have been part of me getting here, I am so grateful to. Chicco Twala found me, and he was in Joburg and me in Umlazi.
Lindelani Mkhize

“I believe the music industry and the department of arts and culture need to get behind this and reboot it. Music is about culture and the dearest currency we can have as a country.”

Mkhize joked how ironic it was that the industry was just getting to grips with the digital space as the Covid-19 pandemic hit.

The affable Mkhize said: “The industry is seriously affected by it [the pandemic] and we navigate around it while protecting ourselves from getting Covid-19.

“It is, however, also one of the best times to create when you’re down. Our music has grown so much and I love what the young people in music are doing, using their computers in back rooms and creating awesome music.”


facebook
twitter
linkedin
instagram

Phumlani S Langa 

Journalist

+27 11 713 9001
Phumlani.Sithebe@citypress.co.za
www.citypress.co.za
69 Kingsway Rd, Auckland Park

We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For only R75 per month, you have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today.
Subscribe to News24

E-Editions

Read the digital editions of City Press here.
Read now
Voting Booth
Were the knee-jerk travel bans imposed on SA following our detection of the Omicron variant necessary?
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
We are being punished
45% - 23 votes
Rather safe than sorry
33% - 17 votes
They have every right
22% - 11 votes
Vote