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Police brutality and gangsterism in SA have emerged as serious issues of national concern

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Community members demonstrate during a sit down peaceful protest against the killing of 16 year old Nathaniel Julies at Eldorado Park.
Community members demonstrate during a sit down peaceful protest against the killing of 16 year old Nathaniel Julies at Eldorado Park.
Laird Forbes, Gallo Images

VOICES

Police brutality has emerged as a serious issue of national concern. Given the widespread concerns about crime and criminality in South Africa, the historical and contemporary context of policing and law enforcement have a significant impact, not only the SA Police Service’s (SAPS) ability to police crime, but also the public’s perceptions of how they police.

In June, Police Minister Bheki Cele told Parliament that 49 cases of police brutality had been reported since the start of the Covid-19 lockdown regulations in March. Cele said that while the police were allowed by law to act with deadly force, they were also bound to act within the law and the Constitution.

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