We have had enough; it’s time to take SA back

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As South Africans, we should say enough is enough and take back what belongs to us.  Picture: iStock. Picture: iStock
As South Africans, we should say enough is enough and take back what belongs to us. Picture: iStock. Picture: iStock

VOICES


Nothing should come as a surprise any more after what I witnessed this week. During one of my many visits to the nearby SPCA, I found someone who had brought a dog in for treatment.

It’s not unusual for people to take their pets to the SPCA to get looked at, but this was a special case. The dog had apparently swallowed a stack of weed and, as a result, the poor animal was wobbly – high – I guess.

Although I wanted to laugh, I realised it wasn’t a joke at all. I watched as the poor pooch was attended to, and it seemed to get better after a jab.

I just said to myself: “What on Earth is this? Imagine a dog high on weed!” Nothing surprises me any more.

Anyway, enough of that. A friend of mine recently jokingly said that it wouldn’t be such a bad idea to start learning other African languages such as Kiswahili and Shonam.

He said that, at the rate things were going, we would soon leave the country to find a job. Being multilingual would be handy.

Trains are no longer moving because the infrastructure has been destroyed, and the roads are dark without street lights

My friend is also frustrated by the state of vandalism in the country. And he was not referring to the ongoing looting related to personal protective equipment tenders, he was talking about the widespread corruption and lawlessness.

I shared my friend’s concerns with Madala, who, also out of frustration, sent me a picture of a wrecked railway track.

I have also seen new street lights being vandalised by thieves as they search for copper wire. It is sad to see what the country has become, and we know the culprits, as they live among us.

Trains are no longer moving because the infrastructure has been destroyed, and the roads are dark without street lights.

Another friend – this one works at the Passenger Rail Agency of SA (Prasa) – painted a bleak picture of the situation with trains.

Because overhead lines have been either stolen or vandalised, they are now forced to use diesel locomotives to pull trains between Tembisa and Isando in Johannesburg, and between Pienaarspoort and Bosman in Pretoria.

He said the situation was terrible, but there was nothing Prasa could do.

We must admit that we are a lawless society and we should be ashamed of ourselves. But only us as citizens can fix things – not greedy politicians who care more about lining their pockets

Do you know how many people rely on trains for transport? Despite their unreliability, trains are affordable not only for the working class, but also for schoolchildren.

With schools reopened and many parents having lost their jobs because of the Covid-19 pandemic, this is the worst time of our lives. How are commuters going to reach their destinations?

We are our own worst enemies. We destroy what belongs to us and we don’t seem to care about tomorrow.

We must admit that we are a lawless society and we should be ashamed of ourselves. But only us as citizens can fix things – not greedy politicians who care more about lining their pockets.

We should say enough is enough and take back what belongs to us. While my friend starts his language lessons so he’s ready, I would rather stay here and fix our country so that our kids don’t inherit the ruins.


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