Steve Kekana and Makhadzi team up as faces of Moshito music conference

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Veteran Steve Kekana teaming up with Makhadzi at this year's Moshito Music Conference and Exhibition.
Veteran Steve Kekana teaming up with Makhadzi at this year's Moshito Music Conference and Exhibition.
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They are both proof that dreams do come true. And they are excited to share the stage at this year's Moshito Music Conference and Exhibition.

This year the theme is all about ‘preserving our Indigenous sounds in the 4IR’. Despite the Covid-19 pandemic, Moshito will host a variety of speakers ranging from artists and industry leaders, entrepreneurs, technology pioneers, digital influencers, and journalists.

Taking centre stage will be Limpopo singer Ndivhudzannyi Ralivhona (24), Makhadzi to her fans. She will collaborate with music giant Advocate Steve Kekana (62) as headline acts for the conference.

With over 40 albums and 42 years of making music Steve says he will retire on the day of his death.

“I will never stop doing music until the day my coffin drops on the ground,” he says.

He is happy to be paired up with young talent. 

“I am elated, everything which has to do with music makes my heart pump. It is almost like being honoured by being asked to be an ambassador. I would love to do everything in my power to enhance the wishes,” he says.

Makhadzi and Steve have never met, but Steve is a fan of her music.

“I know her music. Her song Matorokisi was a big hit and I enjoyed it.” 

Makhadzi is equally excited to meet Steve. “First of all, I never imagined myself to be on a big platform like Moshito. It almost feels unreal. But to be paired up with a legend means I am well on my way to being a legend as well,” she says.

“Growing up I remember hearing Take Your Love And Keep It by Steve Kekana and it brought such good memories for me, but I thought I was just a village girl who would never get an opportunity like this. But it shows hard work pays off and I should dream bigger for myself.” 

Steve cannot wait to go to the studio with Makhadzi and making something meaningful. 

“I would love to do a song called Banna ha ha sa leo (Men are no longer there). The song will be dedicated to stopping the violence against women,” he adds.

“Killing women is has become fashionable these days. There is no dignity in a man who raises his hands to a woman.”  

Makhadzi says the first time she saw Steve Kekana was at the Viewers Choice Awards. She's looking forward to a more direct working relationship. 

“I love working with legends because they carry a lot of knowledge,” she says. “I am always trying to learn something new and better myself so that I am also recognized across the world,” says Makhadzi.

Steve believes this is an opportunity for him to work with more young artists in the future. 

“The new generation needs to preserve our indigenous African sounds. They need to realise that a nation that has nothing to do with their indigenous music will have no space in the world. Groups like Lady Smith Black Mambazo, Amampondo, and such are recognised across the world because of their authenticity and ability to stay original. Make any sound, but keep it indigenous,” he says. 

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