Johannesburg man on how selling eggs from his bicycle landed him a R10k investment from a stranger

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Thokozani Sibeko on his biycle.
Thokozani Sibeko on his biycle.
Thokozani Sibeko/Drum

Whenever you see 20-year-old Thokozani Sibeko, he is likely to be on his bicycle and delivering eggs every day. Over two weeks ago, he decided to ride in a shirt and tie as though he was going to an office job and something amazing happened. He got an investment of R10 000 from a complete stranger which has significantly helped his small business.

Speaking to Move! about his journey, Thokozani said,

“I usually wear my casual uniform, branded cap and a golf T-shirt but that day, I felt positive and I didn’t know why. In my mind I thought I am going to deliver and maybe I will get someone to invest in me and my business.

Little did he know that he was prophesying over his life.

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On the day, he came across a man who was so impressed with his story that he asked more about his business and they started engaging.

“He told me he was impressed that I took my customers seriously. While in conversation, he asked what I needed, and I told him that my plan is to build storage so that I can expand the eggs business and go into selling chickens. I had been thinking about it so much, I had quotations of things I needed, and I showed him, he gave me R10 000 and said he didn’t want any shares he wanted to just help me,” the Vosloorus resident said.

He wasted no time, currently the building of the storage has started.

“Every morning when I start my day, I am now inspired more than ever to sell a lot of eggs because I need to finish building it and grow my business,” he adds.

He is currently studying BCom accounting at the University of Johannesburg and says he is so determined to change the trajectory of poverty and struggle that he is going to do well in both.

Thokozani egg and meat production is getting there. His mother is a cleaner, grandmother is in the recycling business and his 12-year-old cousin, Bongani, is mentally disabled and struggles a lot.

“It breaks my heart to see that he goes through a lot of challenges, we can’t even get a school for him. I feel like I have to work harder so that at least he can get the private healthcare he desperately needs,” he adds.

Above all, he believes no matter where you are from or how you grew up, you can always change where you are going and where you end up

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