FEEL GOOD | 5 inspirational stories that moved us this year

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Lucky du Plessis shares his heart-warming adoption story.
Lucky du Plessis shares his heart-warming adoption story.
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With Covid-19 topping the news across the world, it's hard to focus on anything but the pandemic. But between all the doom and gloom, there were South Africans who have shared their inspirational stories in a year where nothing seemed to be looking up. 

We've compiled a list of 5 inspirational stories that moved us this year. 

Read more | 7 inspiring stories for this World Aids Day

1. I was adopted by my friend's family: East Coast Radio presenter shares his story

He never knew his mother. And his life was turned upside down when he was taken away from his father, only to brought into an abusive environment.

He thought life would never be normal, at least not for him. Until his first primary school friend changed his life forever. 

Lucky du Plessis tells Drum that he was only 5 years old when he met his now brother, Charl.

“For me, it has been amazing,” he says. “I grew up in a family where there was so much love and there has never been a time when I was made to feel like an outsider just because I am not a biological member of the family.”

Read | I was adopted by my friend's family: East Coast Radio presenter shares his story

Lucky du Plessis shares his heart-warming adoption story.

2. Lekau Sehoana: ‘I made sneakers to survive – I didn’t think I’d one day become a sneaker entrepreneur’

Lekau was born in Limpopo but grew up in Ivory park in Gauteng.

His early life wasn’t easy, as his parents had divorced and his unemployed mother was left to find a way to make ends meet for him and his siblings.

From hardship, he rose to become an entrepreneur who runs his own, hugely successful shoe business.

“Being an engineer was more of a dream and making shoes was a survival tool. I made sneakers to survive – I didn’t think I’d one day become a sneaker entrepreneur,” he says.

Read | Lekau Sehoana: ‘I made sneakers to survive – I didn’t think I’d one day become a sneaker entrepreneur’

Founder of Drip Footwear, Lekau Sehoana wants to see at least 20 people every day wearing his sneakers.

3. From domestic worker to international cookbook author: How Fikile Zungu turned her life around

Finding your purpose in life is not always a straightforward path. Sometimes other people recognise your gift before you can see it yourself.

Fikile Zungu tells Drum she had no idea that she had a natural talent for cooking until the people she was working for as a cleaner saw it and pushed her to pursue it.

Fikile worked as a cleaner for many years and she had the opportunity to move to Belgium to work for a former South African ambassador of that country. Her break came when the chef of the house disappeared and there was a vacant position available for a cook.

Little did she know that her life was about to change for the better.

Read | From domestic worker to international cookbook author: How Fikile Zungu turned her life around

Fikile Zungu changed her life and she hopes to inspire other women to achieve their dreams.

4. Joburg woman gets candid about why she decided to share her journey about being HIV-positive

She thought she had found her prince charming, the man whom she was going spend the rest of her life.

Little did she know that he would change her life forever.

The self-published author tells Drum that even though her journey to telling her family wasn’t easy, she is really proud of her mother and how she handled everything since.

“To change a mindset of a 72-year-old, it is not easy because they are dead set on their ways. So I challenged her to the core, and I am really proud of her in general". 

Read | Joburg woman gets candid about why she decided to share her journey about being HIV-positive

#IAmStillMe author and HIV activist Nozibele “Nozi” Qamngana-Mayaba.

5. Ex-con Themba Lukhele taking his power back and helping others to avoid a life of crime

He thought he had it all. A fancy club, luxury cars, friends who hung on to his every word.

He had everything he had ever wanted, but because he never worked for them, he lost them just as quickly as he got them.

For years Themba Lukhele (41) lived a life of crime. He never imagined that it would one day catch up with him.

“Life is not an audition. One mistake can change everything. I cannot undo my past, but I can help someone to make the right choices,” he says.“Toda

Read | Ex-con Themba Lukhele taking his power back and helping others to avoid a life of crime

Themba Lukhele spends his time telling others not to go down the same path as him.

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