Eskom warns against infrastructure damage amid desperate power troubles

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Eskom said it was experiencing an increase in electricity theft and distribution infrastructure failure because of illegal electricity connections.
Eskom said it was experiencing an increase in electricity theft and distribution infrastructure failure because of illegal electricity connections.
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  • Eskom said it was experiencing an increase in electricity theft and distribution infrastructure failure because of illegal electricity connections.
  • The grid continued to experience serious pressure, including breakdowns at units of multiple power stations and a need to replenish reserves.
  • Eskom distribution group executive Monde Bala urged South Africans not to tamper with electricity infrastructure as the damage could compromise capacity.


Eskom warned on Friday morning that ongoing tampering, damage to infrastructure and cable theft exacerbated an already desperate predicament for South Africa's electricity supply.

The statement comes at the end of a week where load shedding was implemented daily, as the grid continued to experience serious pressure, including breakdowns at units of multiple power stations and a need to replenish reserves.

On Friday, Eskom said it was experiencing an increase in electricity theft and distribution infrastructure failure due to illegal electricity connections, which the utility said caused it to lose billions in revenue.

Transformer explosions

"The cold temperatures experienced around the country have led to more people using electricity recklessly and putting our infrastructure under immense pressure. In many cases this results in transformer explosions and other infrastructure being damaged," said the Eskom statement.

Eskom distribution group executive Monde Bala urged South Africans not to tamper with electricity infrastructure as the damage could compromise capacity as the utility continues to grapple with the rising winter demand and load shedding.

"We appeal to all our customers to do the right thing. They must pay for the electricity they are using, ensure that they buy electricity vouchers from legal vendors and stop by-passing and tampering with their meters," said Bala.

The statement urged South Africans to report any tampering with meters and electricity infrastructure that they witness to law enforcement.

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