Millions of car remotes susceptible to hacking - study

Cars on an assembly line. (AFP)
Cars on an assembly line. (AFP)

Frankfurt — A group of computer security experts say they've figured out how to hack the keyless entry systems used on millions of cars.

The experts, based at the University of Birmingham in Britain and at a German security firm, say that remote entry systems on most cars made by Volkswagen since 1995 can be cloned to permit unauthorised access to the car's interior.

The experts say a different system used by brands including Opel, Chevrolet, and Renault can also be defeated.

In a paper to be delivered at the Usenix security conference in Austin, Texas, the authors say a thief could use commonly available equipment to intercept entry codes when owners press the button on their remotes.

Volkswagen says its latest models, like the Golf, Tiguan, Touran and Passat, aren't affected.

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