Apple admits it deliberately slows iPhones as batteries age

San Francisco - Apple on Thursday confirmed what some conspiracy theorists suspected - that it intentionally slows performance of older iPhones as batteries weaken from age.

The admission played into concerns that Apple was stealthily nudging iPhone users to upgrade to newer models by letting them think it was the handsets that needed replacing and not just a matter of getting new batteries.

"Our goal is to deliver the best experience for customers, which includes overall performance and prolonging the life of their devices," an Apple spokesperson said in response to an AFP inquiry.

"Lithium-ion batteries become less capable of supplying peak current demands when in cold conditions, have a low battery charge or as they age over time, which can result in the device unexpectedly shutting down to protect its electronic components."

Lithium-ion batteries are commonly used in mobile devices, and charging capacity naturally wanes with use and time.

Meanwhile, smartphone operating software is perpetually improved with updates that typically increase appetites for electricity.

Last year, Apple introduced a feature to "smooth out" spikes in demand for power to prevent iPhone 6 models from shutting down due to the cold or weak batteries, according to the California-based company.

The iPhone 6 made its debut in late 2014.

The feature, which slows performance to demand less power, has been extended to iPhone 7 handsets with the latest iOS operating software and will be added to other Apple products "in the future," the spokesperson said.

Apple releases new iPhone models annually, and sales of the handsets power its money-making engine.

People worried about performance could replace batteries, which Apple does for free for iPhones covered by warranty or for $79 if that is not the case.

Apple design of handsets makes it borderline impossible for people to change batteries themselves.

Rumours have persisted for years at tech news websites devoted to Apple products and among fans of the company's products that iPhone performance was being intentionally slowed, perhaps to push users to buy newer models.

The consumer electronics industry overall has routinely been accused of designing products that wear out sooner than necessary in a strategy referred to as "planned obsolescence."

* Sign up to Fin24's top news in your inbox: SUBSCRIBE TO FIN24 NEWSLETTER

We live in a world where facts and fiction get blurred
In times of uncertainty you need journalism you can trust. For only R75 per month, you have access to a world of in-depth analyses, investigative journalism, top opinions and a range of features. Journalism strengthens democracy. Invest in the future today.
Subscribe to News24
ZAR/USD
16.21
(+0.74)
ZAR/GBP
21.21
(+1.09)
ZAR/EUR
19.17
(+0.96)
ZAR/AUD
11.52
(+0.73)
ZAR/JPY
0.15
(+0.93)
Gold
1898.55
(-1.18)
Silver
24.55
(-1.54)
Platinum
876.00
(-0.85)
Brent Crude
42.06
(-3.35)
Palladium
2377.00
(-0.06)
All Share
54796.42
(-0.99)
Top 40
50276.84
(-1.23)
Financial 15
10376.28
(+2.34)
Industrial 25
74130.97
(-0.60)
Resource 10
52819.20
(-2.99)
All JSE data delayed by at least 15 minutes morningstar logo
Company Snapshot
Voting Booth
Please select an option Oops! Something went wrong, please try again later.
Results
Yes, and I've gotten it.
24% - 50 votes
No, I did not.
50% - 103 votes
My landlord refused
26% - 54 votes
Vote